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By Robert W. Greene | June 8, 1997
About 600 Boston University journalism students had braved a rainy Friday night in 1976 to hear a panel discussion on investigative reporting. Who wants to become an investigative reporter, they were asked. Almost 300 hands went up.These young people were already enthralled with the Watergate legacy. They took it on faith that there was an endless supply of Deep Throats out there, governors and presidents to be gotten, Pulitzer Prizes and movie contracts to be won.Watergate, the political scandal that so motivated these young people, is 25 years old this year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
I don't care if Al Gore got more money than he ever deserved for his pathetic channel, or Glenn Beck got the short end of the stick in trying to buy it as an escape from his prison of media marginalization. All of that is ideological and personality-obsessed, pop-culture nonsense that misses the point of the sale of Current TV to Al Jazeera. What's important is that Al Jazeera has found a way into an estimated 40 million American homes through the purchase of Gore's mismanaged channel, and that is a good thing - a very good thing.
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NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | September 5, 1995
Honolulu. -- Isn't it amazing that we celebrate the end of great wars by dredging up the worst hatreds and resentments, thus guaranteeing that the emotional warfare will never end?I'm here for the Freedom Forum to discuss the ways in which the press has marked the 50th anniversary of V-J Day, the victory over Japan. I note that the media have seen no great event in the surrender ceremonies on the battleship Missouri -- those were but a tepid anticlimax to two horrendous atomic explosions that delivered fiery terror to Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 16, 2011
Last night I made the mistake of accidentally leaving the channel on Lawrence O'Donnell's show. This turned out to be a much greater error than I originally thought. Prior to this, I mistakenly believed O'Donnell's show would be something similar to Rachel Maddow's. I like Maddow. I don't always agree with her, but she's smart, funny and treats her guests with respect.  But O'Donnell was much, much different. He was completely humorless. He was pedantic and moralizing. He managed to be shallow, didactic, illogical and myopic all at the same time.  On the show, O'Donnell took on that toughest of opponents: the British royal wedding between Prince William and Kate Middleton.  What followed was a meandering diatribe bashing the history of the British empire and the state of American media.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 16, 2011
Last night I made the mistake of accidentally leaving the channel on Lawrence O'Donnell's show. This turned out to be a much greater error than I originally thought. Prior to this, I mistakenly believed O'Donnell's show would be something similar to Rachel Maddow's. I like Maddow. I don't always agree with her, but she's smart, funny and treats her guests with respect.  But O'Donnell was much, much different. He was completely humorless. He was pedantic and moralizing. He managed to be shallow, didactic, illogical and myopic all at the same time.  On the show, O'Donnell took on that toughest of opponents: the British royal wedding between Prince William and Kate Middleton.  What followed was a meandering diatribe bashing the history of the British empire and the state of American media.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2001
Two suspicious letters - one delivered in New York and another in Nevada - have been found to contain anthrax, while five more employees of a Florida tabloid publisher have tested positive for exposure to the rare and deadly bacteria, officials announced yesterday. FBI and health officials, who say they still have no evidence that the incidents in the three states are linked to the Sept. 11 terrorists or to one another, lead a criminal investigation that is rapidly widening in scope and complexity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
I don't care if Al Gore got more money than he ever deserved for his pathetic channel, or Glenn Beck got the short end of the stick in trying to buy it as an escape from his prison of media marginalization. All of that is ideological and personality-obsessed, pop-culture nonsense that misses the point of the sale of Current TV to Al Jazeera. What's important is that Al Jazeera has found a way into an estimated 40 million American homes through the purchase of Gore's mismanaged channel, and that is a good thing - a very good thing.
NEWS
By Paul Delaney | December 13, 1998
ASILAH, a small town on the Atlantic coast in Morocco, is as perfect a setting as any for a knock-down, drag-out discussion of most controversial subjects. How American media portray Arabs fits the category.Banners welcomed participants to the annual Afro-Arab Cultural Festival, a not-too-subtle effort to link the two dominant cultures on the continent, a theme of the dominant political figure in town, Mayor Mohamed Benaissa, who is also Morocco's ambassador to the United States.He and the Moroccan government sponsored (truth in advertising here)
NEWS
By Bruce A. Jacobs | March 8, 1991
I CREATE advertising, among other things, for a living. I come up with ideas for ad campaigns, and I write commercials, and I translate marketing mumbo jumbo into ideas that sell things. I am also an African-American.I tell you all of this because I recently had an unexpected skirmish. It has to do with the long-standing battle to improve the image of black people in the American media. And it left me wondering which side of the barricade some self-styled black media critics are really on.A client of mine, for whom I recently created a TV commercial, called me on the telephone the other day. She was perplexed and upset.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | January 18, 2007
Nothing is easier than to second-guess decisions made in wartime. Anyone who has bothered to read the history of wars knows that very few wars have been without disastrous surprises, often on both sides. It is not that the people in charge are stupid. Too many things are unpredictable in war, despite politicians who demand timetables, as if running a war were like running a train. We can now look at the Iraq war with hindsight, as no president or secretary of defense could when making decisions that had to be made.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | February 11, 2007
American media consumers - TV watchers and newspaper readers in particular - are like the woman who didn't realize her husband had a drinking problem until one night he came home sober. She knew there was a problem, but she needed something to make clear what the problem was. As for consumers of media, people are beginning to see the problems - and the stakes. They were taught in high school that a vigilant, independent press is essential for democracy to survive, particularly in wartime, when there is pressure to suppress civil liberties and limit press freedom.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | January 18, 2007
Nothing is easier than to second-guess decisions made in wartime. Anyone who has bothered to read the history of wars knows that very few wars have been without disastrous surprises, often on both sides. It is not that the people in charge are stupid. Too many things are unpredictable in war, despite politicians who demand timetables, as if running a war were like running a train. We can now look at the Iraq war with hindsight, as no president or secretary of defense could when making decisions that had to be made.
NEWS
By Amy Goodman and David Goodman | April 7, 2005
RECENT REVELATIONS that the Bush administration has been fabricating news stories, secretly hiring journalists to write puff pieces and credentialing fake reporters at White House news conferences has infuriated the news media. Editorials profess to being shocked - shocked! - by the government's covert propaganda campaign in which, as The New York Times revealed March 13, at least 20 federal agencies have spent $250 million creating and sending fake news segments to local TV stations. But the media have only themselves to blame for most people - including TV news managers - not being able to distinguish journalism from propaganda.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2004
With scandals besetting some of the nation's most respected media outlets, why would anyone trust what they read in newspapers and magazines or what they see on television news programs? Many Americans don't. A new Gallup Poll, based on surveys taken last week, found that media credibility rests at its lowest point in decades. Just 44 percent of Americans now say they are confident that U.S. news outlets are presenting the news accurately and completely. That's down from 54 percent a year ago -- about the same as it had been for seven years.
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | November 6, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Since Sept. 11, the American media have aired a lot of controversial opinions: Give peace a chance. President Bush is mishandling the war. Let's start deporting Arabs and drop nuclear bombs on Afghanistan. The United States should stop its unilateral support of Israel. These might be unpopular opinions to many, but should columnists and journalists be excoriated if they express them in their articles? Free speech by journalists is essential in our society, but in the aftermath of Sept.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2001
Two suspicious letters - one delivered in New York and another in Nevada - have been found to contain anthrax, while five more employees of a Florida tabloid publisher have tested positive for exposure to the rare and deadly bacteria, officials announced yesterday. FBI and health officials, who say they still have no evidence that the incidents in the three states are linked to the Sept. 11 terrorists or to one another, lead a criminal investigation that is rapidly widening in scope and complexity.
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | November 6, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Since Sept. 11, the American media have aired a lot of controversial opinions: Give peace a chance. President Bush is mishandling the war. Let's start deporting Arabs and drop nuclear bombs on Afghanistan. The United States should stop its unilateral support of Israel. These might be unpopular opinions to many, but should columnists and journalists be excoriated if they express them in their articles? Free speech by journalists is essential in our society, but in the aftermath of Sept.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | February 11, 2007
American media consumers - TV watchers and newspaper readers in particular - are like the woman who didn't realize her husband had a drinking problem until one night he came home sober. She knew there was a problem, but she needed something to make clear what the problem was. As for consumers of media, people are beginning to see the problems - and the stakes. They were taught in high school that a vigilant, independent press is essential for democracy to survive, particularly in wartime, when there is pressure to suppress civil liberties and limit press freedom.
NEWS
By Paul Delaney | December 13, 1998
ASILAH, a small town on the Atlantic coast in Morocco, is as perfect a setting as any for a knock-down, drag-out discussion of most controversial subjects. How American media portray Arabs fits the category.Banners welcomed participants to the annual Afro-Arab Cultural Festival, a not-too-subtle effort to link the two dominant cultures on the continent, a theme of the dominant political figure in town, Mayor Mohamed Benaissa, who is also Morocco's ambassador to the United States.He and the Moroccan government sponsored (truth in advertising here)
NEWS
By Robert W. Greene | June 8, 1997
About 600 Boston University journalism students had braved a rainy Friday night in 1976 to hear a panel discussion on investigative reporting. Who wants to become an investigative reporter, they were asked. Almost 300 hands went up.These young people were already enthralled with the Watergate legacy. They took it on faith that there was an endless supply of Deep Throats out there, governors and presidents to be gotten, Pulitzer Prizes and movie contracts to be won.Watergate, the political scandal that so motivated these young people, is 25 years old this year.
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