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October 13, 1997
A three-part documentary series, "National Desk" (11 p.m.-midnight, MPT, Channels 22 and 67), addresses patterns in American life that are "eroding common culture." In "Redefining Racism: New Voices From Black America," radio talk-show host Larry Elder studies the differences between blacks and whites, while offering hopeful signs that point toward reconciliation. PBS.Pub Date: 10/13/97
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Here are my two conflicting thoughts on tonight's "24: Live Another Day. " First, I cannot remember the last sequel to a major series that did as smart as job as this one in picking up old threads of theme and character and adapting them for today. That said, I started the screener with almost no interest in finding out what Jack Bauer (Kiefer Sutherland) was up to after four years off the grid, and I ended up caring less after I knew. I don't know if that's a function of Bauer, a character who once spoke so profoundly to a nation beset by post- 9/11 jitters, not having the same relevance today - or viewers like me having moved on and come to understand that our nation's problems are far too complex to be redeemed by any kind of hero.
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FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | March 22, 2007
Celluloid dreams. They infect the best of us, even those who seem immune. Take Ira Glass, host of This American Life. Early last year, Glass uprooted his innovative, popular public radio show and moved the whole shebang -- staff members, their families and pets -- from Chicago to New York to film a television series. Glass is proud of the result, but there were costs associated with the transition from an aural to a visual method of storytelling, from lives that were changed, to a lessened involvement -- temporarily, he says -- with the radio show.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 15, 2014
In response to this month's mass shooting at Fort Hood, Speaker of the House John Boehner said mentally disturbed people should not be allowed to get their hands on firearms. But don't hold your breath waiting for legislation to emerge from Congress to keep that from happening. "There's no question that those with mental health issues should be prevented from owning weapons or being able to purchase weapons. " That is what Boehner said. Yet, last year, when a bipartisan bill to set up a system of background checks for gun purchases was put forward, Mr. Boehner showed no enthusiasm for bringing it up for a vote in the House.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
It may be the world's greatest public works project, but the United States interstate highway system doesn't inspire instant awe like the Great Wall of China, Egypt's pyramids and other man-made wonders. Some may admire the 46,837-mile network as a breathtaking engineering feat, but for millions of commuters, vacationers and errand runners, it is a simply a convenience built for a society with a mania for motion. But the interstate is remarkable for much more than its engineering. The system, which celebrates its 50th anniversary Thursday, has indelibly transformed American life -- for good and for bad. "In the simplest terms, the interstate helped us to determine where we put our houses, our factories, how we transport our livestock and food products, and how much we can distribute," says William L. Withuhn, curator of transportation at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, where an exhibit called America on the Move is on display.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | May 1, 2008
On radio, This American Life is a treasure - a brilliantly conceived form of quirky, true-life storytelling that has spawned a host of imitators and stands with the finest work the medium has delivered. But on TV last year, not so brilliant. While the first season on Showtime was promising, mistakes were made - even host and executive producer Ira Glass says so. Information This American Life begins its second season at 10 p.m. Sunday on Showtime. Tonight's live event starts at 8. For ticket information, contact Bel Air Cinema Stadium 14 at 410-569-8276 or Snowden Square Stadium 14 at 410-872-0670, or go to fathomevents.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | March 31, 1995
Washington. -- Americans are at each other's throats these days because some politicians are telling them that these are the worst of times.We are encouraged to blame those who do not look like us or think like us for all our grievances.I got a bit of relief from this orgy of self-pity and scapegoating Wednesday when I read a Wall Street Journal article comparing family life in America now with what it was in 1974.I saw a mixed bag of change that showed us enjoying many creature comforts at reduced prices, yet paying more for some of the essentials of civilized life.
NEWS
September 21, 2013
I heartily disagree with Michael Saltzman's opinion that raising the minimum wage will kill jobs ("Job-killer, thy name is minimum wage," Sept. 16). The late '50s and early '60s were probably the most prosperous years in American life, and at that time, the minimum wage was a livable salary. People earned money, so they spent it on groceries, clothing, housing and the like, and our taxes were reasonable. It was only when minimum wages failed to keep up with the cost of living that many people had to begin to rely on the government for help.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Andy Griffith, one of the stars who put CBS on top of the TV world in the 1960s with an easy-going but culturally-packed sitcom that ran for eight seasons during that stormy decade in American life, died Tuesday at 86 at his North Carolina home in Roanoke Island. Like Fred MacMurry, whose range ran from the feature film  "Double Indemnity"  to TV's "My Three Sons," Griffith was far more than just another TV actor from the early days of the medium. Before TV and Sheriff Andy Taylor, he was Lonesome Rhodes in Elia Kazan's "A Face in the Crowd," And he found renewed TV fame in the 1980s and '90s as Harvard-educated attorney Ben Matlock.
TOPIC
By Ward Connerly | December 24, 2000
NOW THAT George W. Bush finally is our president-elect, he can begin thinking about his presidential agenda. At the top of the list should be the issue of race. According to the exit polls, 90 percent of black voters favored Vice President Al Gore, while only 9 percent favored Bush. Obviously, this voting pattern is a topic of concern to Bush and the Republican Party. But its implications should be a matter of national concern as well. How do we explain the fact that a voting bloc representing about 12 percent of Americans believed Gore would be better for them when the rest of the nation viewed Bush and Gore, as my grandmother would say, as "six of one and half a dozen of another"?
NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | March 21, 2014
Prepared for the next invasion? It will not be led by foreign terrorists or illegal immigrants. This invasion will come in the form of drones - an American specialty. A judge has just ruled that the Federal Aviation Agency cannot ban from public airspace flying robots or pilotless air vehicles owned by commercial enterprises. This decision means drones will no longer be used primarily for war or border patrols. They will soon become part of everyday life. Advocates anticipate a veritable panacea.
NEWS
September 21, 2013
I heartily disagree with Michael Saltzman's opinion that raising the minimum wage will kill jobs ("Job-killer, thy name is minimum wage," Sept. 16). The late '50s and early '60s were probably the most prosperous years in American life, and at that time, the minimum wage was a livable salary. People earned money, so they spent it on groceries, clothing, housing and the like, and our taxes were reasonable. It was only when minimum wages failed to keep up with the cost of living that many people had to begin to rely on the government for help.
NEWS
By Meghan Daum | May 31, 2013
We're No. 6! That's according to new data from the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, which on Tuesday released results of a survey measuring quality of life in 36 industrialized nations. For the last three years, the Paris-based outfit has weighed 11 criteria, including housing, income, jobs, environment, safety and work-life balance. For the third year in a row, Australia was the big winner, thanks in large part to an economy that managed to avoid the global recession of the last decade.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | April 18, 2013
After the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the most frequently heard forecast was: "This changes everything. " Americans would live in constant fear of the next attack, many pundits predicted. The desire for safety would spawn a security state that would trample constitutional freedoms. The economy would take a long-term hit. American life would never be the same. Most of those dire predictions didn't come true, of course. The U.S. economy rebounded quickly. Civil liberties came under stress, but fears of a surveillance state weren't realized.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
An upstairs room at Asbury Methodist Church is stuffed with memorabilia and documents of the Annapolis church, from faded photos of generations of church leaders to mugs commemorating the recent 200th anniversary. The filing cabinets that line a back wall in this informal exhibit space contain a trove of church records - births, deaths and marriages among them. The glass cabinets elsewhere in the room hold other items, including a tea kettle that a century ago sat on a wood-fired stove in the church, used to boil water for tea for the pastor and his visitors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
President Barack Obama came out swinging Tuesday night in the  town hall debate with Mitt Romney, and while he didn't land any pure knockdown punches, his base is sure to be encouraged by seeing a a president on TV who once again seemed engaged in the fight to hold the White House. What a difference between this Obama and the distracted, somnambulant character viewers saw in his first debate with a dominant Romney. The Democratic president on the screen Tuesday night at Hofstra University seemed like someone who gave a darn -- at least about some of the troubles this nation is experiencing in these hard times.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 13, 2003
Now she has a conscience. After 20 years of in-your-face-and-down-your-throat attitude, lyrics and images, Madonna's concerned about disturbing the public. It was a surprise (dare I say a shock?) when the pop star -- known for, among other things, her pointless pornographic coffee table book and bad movies -- pulled the "controversial" video for her single "American Life." And the veteran pop tart knows exactly what she's doing as she draws attention to her latest project. She'll appear on MTV on April 22 in an "exclusive" interview to "explain" all the hype now circling the video that the American public has yet to see. The clip, ironically available in Europe, reportedly bombards viewers with wartime images and awkward references to American-style decadence and self-absorption.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
I have no idea what opportunities exist for Hakha Chin speakers in Baltimore, but it's good refugees understand job competition ("Short course in American life," March 3). Now let's find a way to train young Americans in the same game of musical chairs that the Baltimore Orientation Center provides. A six-year Gallup "World Poll" study on what most people all over the world desire discovered "what the whole world wants is a good job. " It's time Americans woke up to this worldwide job struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
The Walters Art Museum has been granted $111,615 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to support a nearly two-year project called "American Visions: Engaging the Community with American Art. " "In the minds of the public, the Walters is a place known more for ancient, medieval, Renaissance and baroque work," said Joy Heyrman, development director at the Walters, "but the founder, William Walters, cut his teeth as a collector on...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Andy Griffith, one of the stars who put CBS on top of the TV world in the 1960s with an easy-going but culturally-packed sitcom that ran for eight seasons during that stormy decade in American life, died Tuesday at 86 at his North Carolina home in Roanoke Island. Like Fred MacMurry, whose range ran from the feature film  "Double Indemnity"  to TV's "My Three Sons," Griffith was far more than just another TV actor from the early days of the medium. Before TV and Sheriff Andy Taylor, he was Lonesome Rhodes in Elia Kazan's "A Face in the Crowd," And he found renewed TV fame in the 1980s and '90s as Harvard-educated attorney Ben Matlock.
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