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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | July 6, 2007
Bruce Wasserstein, the chairman of Lazard Ltd., has agreed to sell The American Lawyer magazine and the rest of his legal and real estate publishing business to Incisive Media PLC of the United Kingdom for $630 million. Wasserstein, a former lawyer who built his career advising on acquisitions, and investors paid $63 million for American Lawyer and $200 million for National Law Publishing Co. in 1997 to form the company that is now ALM. Incisive said in a statement yesterday that it will pay cash for ALM, which publishes 33 U.S. magazines and newspapers for the legal and property professions.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | July 6, 2007
Bruce Wasserstein, the chairman of Lazard Ltd., has agreed to sell The American Lawyer magazine and the rest of his legal and real estate publishing business to Incisive Media PLC of the United Kingdom for $630 million. Wasserstein, a former lawyer who built his career advising on acquisitions, and investors paid $63 million for American Lawyer and $200 million for National Law Publishing Co. in 1997 to form the company that is now ALM. Incisive said in a statement yesterday that it will pay cash for ALM, which publishes 33 U.S. magazines and newspapers for the legal and property professions.
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NEWS
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1997
Flipping through faded issues of "The First Colored Directory of Baltimore City" is a trip back in time.Back to a time of segregation, "race men" and "the Talented Tenth," a time when Thurgood Marshall, then just another lawyer with a downtown office, could take out a small ad for his services."
NEWS
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1997
Flipping through faded issues of "The First Colored Directory of Baltimore City" is a trip back in time.Back to a time of segregation, "race men" and "the Talented Tenth," a time when Thurgood Marshall, then just another lawyer with a downtown office, could take out a small ad for his services."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2010
'Not in My Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City,' by Antero Pietila (Ivan R. Dee, 320 pages, $28.95) Builder James W. Rouse is remembered as a visionary because of his shopping malls and new towns, like Columbia - promoted as free of racial discrimination. But Rouse had another, less egalitarian side, according to Antero Pietila, a former Baltimore Sun reporter and editorial writer. That side had shown itself a few years earlier in 1951 when, as vice president of the Northwood Co., Rouse looked the other way as blacks and Jews were excluded from the Northwood community.
NEWS
By SCOTT SHANE AND TOM BOWMAN and SCOTT SHANE AND TOM BOWMAN,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1995
When the National Security Agency trains its agents in the highly technical art of eavesdropping, they naturally need to practice.And the law gives them the right to practice on you.NSA agents can hone their listening skills and test their equipment on the most intimate telephone calls of ordinary U.S. citizens, as long as notes and tapes are destroyed "as soon as reasonably possible.""We listened to all the calls in and out of Washington," says one former NSA linguist, recalling a class at the Warrenton Training Center, a CIA communications school on a Virginia hilltop.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | June 30, 1992
A ranking of the nation's 100 most profitable law firms places Baltimore's two biggest firms near the bottom of the list, but local attorneys say the comparisons aren't fair.In its July/August issue released yesterday, The American Lawyer magazine says that partners at Piper & Marbury and at Venable, Baetjer and Howard -- the only Baltimore firms listed -- earned far less for their firms than the average $400,000 earned at the top 100 law firms last year.But lawyers familiar with the finances of Baltimore law firms said the national figure is skewed because many of the top 100 firms are based in New York City, where hourly fees are often double the rates of firms elsewhere.
BUSINESS
By The Christian Science Monitor | May 23, 1994
NEW YORK -- Legions of attorneys from New York to Los Angeles must have grumbled to themselves, over the last 15 years, "If only Steven Brill had become a lawyer."But the Yale Law School graduate says he "never thought about practicing law for a minute." In an interview in his midtown-Manhattan office, Mr. Brill recalls that, during his last year in law school in the mid-1970s, the career-guidance director told him that "I was the only student in the last several years who had never shown up in the placement office.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
The Baltimore legal powerhouse of Venable, Baetjer and Howard has fallen from a respected ranking of the nation's top 100 law firms, showing the impact of staff cuts that have lowered the attorney count at Maryland's second-biggest law firm by 13 percent.Piper & Marbury is the only Maryland firm that stayed in American Lawyer magazine's Top 100. Piper's 1993 revenue of $79 million, or $300,000 for each of its 265 lawyers, was good for 90th place.Piper's profits per partner fell 7.3 percent, to $255,000.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1996
Verdict's in: The American Lawyer magazine reports that th legal business is rebounding somewhat. Hiring was up 3 percent in 1995 at the nation's 100 biggest firms after three years of declines, and the firms' combined revenue rose 5.9 percent. But profits per partner were down, and revenue per lawyer was down at 26 firms.Clip work: If you clip coupons every Sunday, you have company. Carol Wright Promotions Inc., a market research firm, reports that 87 percent of consumers use grocery or health and beauty product coupons.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | June 30, 1992
A ranking of the nation's 100 most profitable law firms placed Baltimore's two biggest firms near the bottom of the list yesterday, but local attorneys said the comparisons weren't fair.In its July/August issue released yesterday, The American Lawyer magazine said that partners at Piper & Marbury and Venable, Baetjer and Howard -- the only Baltimore firms listed -- earned far less for their firms than the average $400,000 earned at the top 100 law firms last year.But lawyers familiar with the finances of Baltimore law firms said that national figure was skewed because many of the top 100 firms were based in New York City, where hourly fees were often double the rates of firms elsewhere.
NEWS
April 8, 1993
The Russian Ministry of Security has ordered Baltimore Su correspondent Will Englund to report back to Moscow's Lefortovo prison today for questioning, after informing him yesterday that his American lawyer and a U.S. Embassy official will be barred from the meeting.Mr. Englund answered an earlier summons yesterday but declined to cooperate when the Russian investigator refused to allow the lawyer and the consular official to be present.The correspondent has not been told why the Ministry of Security, known as the KGB until 1991, wants to question him. But the official who summoned him, a captain in the former KGB named Viktor A. Shkarin, is the chief investigator in a case being prepared against Vil Mirzayanov, a Russian chemist.
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