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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Shackled in a Baltimore courtroom and facing a 110-year sentence for murder and arson, Terrence Rollins-Bey stood defiant - talking over the judge and prosecutor in a series of outbursts. "With respect to your honor, I object to everything you're saying," he said. Rollins-Bey, 25, was the second murder defendant in a week to openly challenge the authority of Baltimore Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown. Rollins-Bey and Robert G. Moore claimed in separate trials the court lacked standing to hear their cases - a move the judge described as an attempt to frustrate the proceedings.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Shackled in a Baltimore courtroom and facing a 110-year sentence for murder and arson, Terrence Rollins-Bey stood defiant - talking over the judge and prosecutor in a series of outbursts. "With respect to your honor, I object to everything you're saying," he said. Rollins-Bey, 25, was the second murder defendant in a week to openly challenge the authority of Baltimore Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown. Rollins-Bey and Robert G. Moore claimed in separate trials the court lacked standing to hear their cases - a move the judge described as an attempt to frustrate the proceedings.
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NEWS
By Jeffrey Ian Ross | June 19, 2012
The recent crash of a $176 million Navy drone in a Chesapeake Bay marsh highlights a number of brewing issues over the domestic use of this new technology. Over the past decade, since the United States' invasion of Iraq and Afghanistan and framed by the Bush and Obama administrations' war on terror, the use of drones as both a surveillance tool and a means to kill insurgents has increased. This is a story about effective law enforcement, proper training, the associated costs - and the deadly consequences, intentional or not. Although there was some public consternation last year regarding the use of drones (also known as unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs)
NEWS
By Jeffrey Ian Ross | June 19, 2012
The recent crash of a $176 million Navy drone in a Chesapeake Bay marsh highlights a number of brewing issues over the domestic use of this new technology. Over the past decade, since the United States' invasion of Iraq and Afghanistan and framed by the Bush and Obama administrations' war on terror, the use of drones as both a surveillance tool and a means to kill insurgents has increased. This is a story about effective law enforcement, proper training, the associated costs - and the deadly consequences, intentional or not. Although there was some public consternation last year regarding the use of drones (also known as unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs)
NEWS
By Mona Charen | July 15, 2002
WASHINGTON - Here are two stories of Saudi-U.S. relations. Read them and judge who in this relationship is behaving as if it has the whip hand. As William McGurn reports in The Wall Street Journal, Monica Stowers, an American, married a young Saudi man she had met at the University of Dallas in the early 1980s. They had two children. When both children were still infants, the couple moved to Saudi Arabia. There, as Mr. McGurn writes, Ms. Stowers was in for a "nasty shock." Her husband was already married and had other children by his first wife.
NEWS
By Phillip J. Closius | June 4, 2012
The Golden Age of American legal education is dead. Every law dean knows it, but only some of them will feel it. Elite schools (the top 25 in U.S. News & World Report's rankings) and the 43 non-elite state "flagship" law schools are almost immune to market pressures. Those at risk will come from the other 132 law schools - the ones that produce the majority of law graduates. Law schools have increased tuition drastically for almost 20 years, beginning in the 1990s when universities refused to continue subsidizing the affordable public law schools.
NEWS
By William K. Marimow | January 29, 1995
'The Death of Common Sense: How Law is Suffocating America,' by Philip K. Howard, Random House, 202 pages, 18.00.Dr. Michael McGuire's skirmish with federal auditors started because the five-acre lawn at his UCLA research lab needed mowing. When the lab's lawn mower broke, McGuire promptly bought a replacement and told the grounds crew to save the old one for spare parts. Months later, during a routine audit of the lab, which is funded by the Veteran's Administration, federal officials were dismayed to learn - from McGuire himself - that the new lawn mower was purchased without the required approvals.
NEWS
July 25, 1997
IN HIS 34 years on the United States Supreme Court, Justice William J. Brennan made his presence felt in many ways. Appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, a Republican, Justice Brennan became an influential liberal, writing more opinions than any justice in the court's history except for the prolific Justice William O. Douglas.His opinions shaped key areas of the law, especially individual rights. From the principle of "one person, one vote," which has guided reapportionment of legislative and congressional districts, to access for prisoners, the poor and the disabled to legal remedies for discrimination or unconstitutional treatment, Justice Brennan's decisions reflected an unshakable belief that the liberties enshrined in the Bill of Rights take precedence over the prerogatives or convenience of government.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 24, 2000
Our murder rate is starting so high that if a police management change actually made a difference, citizens could tell. If Congress declared Elian Gonzalez a citizen, American law and family values would still award custody to his father. Psst. Federal budget surpluses don't count until we pay down the national debt. Derek Jeter earns so much playing Yankeeball, he may merge with American Online.
NEWS
August 3, 2002
Gerald Gunther, 75, the author of the standard American law school casebook Constitutional Law who was mentioned as a Supreme Court prospect, died in San Francisco on Tuesday of lung cancer. Mr. Gunther was born in 1927 in Usingen, Germany, near Frankfurt. From 1956 to 1962 he was a faculty member at Columbia University School of Law until he was lured away to teach at Stanford, where he was a faculty member the next 40 years. Mr. Gunther was an expert on the U.S. Supreme Court. A poll issued in 1987 by New York Law Journal ranked him as the "best qualified" choice for appointment to the Supreme Court.
NEWS
By Phillip J. Closius | June 4, 2012
The Golden Age of American legal education is dead. Every law dean knows it, but only some of them will feel it. Elite schools (the top 25 in U.S. News & World Report's rankings) and the 43 non-elite state "flagship" law schools are almost immune to market pressures. Those at risk will come from the other 132 law schools - the ones that produce the majority of law graduates. Law schools have increased tuition drastically for almost 20 years, beginning in the 1990s when universities refused to continue subsidizing the affordable public law schools.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | July 15, 2002
WASHINGTON - Here are two stories of Saudi-U.S. relations. Read them and judge who in this relationship is behaving as if it has the whip hand. As William McGurn reports in The Wall Street Journal, Monica Stowers, an American, married a young Saudi man she had met at the University of Dallas in the early 1980s. They had two children. When both children were still infants, the couple moved to Saudi Arabia. There, as Mr. McGurn writes, Ms. Stowers was in for a "nasty shock." Her husband was already married and had other children by his first wife.
NEWS
July 25, 1997
IN HIS 34 years on the United States Supreme Court, Justice William J. Brennan made his presence felt in many ways. Appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, a Republican, Justice Brennan became an influential liberal, writing more opinions than any justice in the court's history except for the prolific Justice William O. Douglas.His opinions shaped key areas of the law, especially individual rights. From the principle of "one person, one vote," which has guided reapportionment of legislative and congressional districts, to access for prisoners, the poor and the disabled to legal remedies for discrimination or unconstitutional treatment, Justice Brennan's decisions reflected an unshakable belief that the liberties enshrined in the Bill of Rights take precedence over the prerogatives or convenience of government.
NEWS
By William K. Marimow | January 29, 1995
'The Death of Common Sense: How Law is Suffocating America,' by Philip K. Howard, Random House, 202 pages, 18.00.Dr. Michael McGuire's skirmish with federal auditors started because the five-acre lawn at his UCLA research lab needed mowing. When the lab's lawn mower broke, McGuire promptly bought a replacement and told the grounds crew to save the old one for spare parts. Months later, during a routine audit of the lab, which is funded by the Veteran's Administration, federal officials were dismayed to learn - from McGuire himself - that the new lawn mower was purchased without the required approvals.
NEWS
June 29, 1991
Should Thurgood Marshall's replacement on the Supreme Court be a black? Of course. This has nothing to do with quotas or affirmative action. It has to do with the Supreme Court's ability to deal with one of the most vexing and enduring problem areas of American law. That is race (not ethnic, not sex) relations.The Constitution of 1787 deals with race (Article I, Section IX), and so do the Reconstruction amendments (XIII, XIV and XV), and so does the modern-day amendment (XXIV) abolishing state poll taxes.
NEWS
October 23, 1996
Michael H. Cardozo IV,86, an attorney and educator who served as founding executive director of the Association of American Law Schools for a decade, died of lung disease Sunday in Washington.A cousin of the late Supreme Court Justice Benjamin Cardozo, he ran the association from 1963 to 1973 after teaching at Cornell University law school from 1952 to 1963.Ferdinand "Ferd" Johnson,90, longtime "Moon Mullins" cartoon strip artist, died Oct. 14 in Los Angeles. He drew "Moon Mullins," a cartoon strip about a pool-hall regular, until 1991.
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