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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Shackled in a Baltimore courtroom and facing a 110-year sentence for murder and arson, Terrence Rollins-Bey stood defiant - talking over the judge and prosecutor in a series of outbursts. "With respect to your honor, I object to everything you're saying," he said. Rollins-Bey, 25, was the second murder defendant in a week to openly challenge the authority of Baltimore Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown. Rollins-Bey and Robert G. Moore claimed in separate trials the court lacked standing to hear their cases - a move the judge described as an attempt to frustrate the proceedings.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Shackled in a Baltimore courtroom and facing a 110-year sentence for murder and arson, Terrence Rollins-Bey stood defiant - talking over the judge and prosecutor in a series of outbursts. "With respect to your honor, I object to everything you're saying," he said. Rollins-Bey, 25, was the second murder defendant in a week to openly challenge the authority of Baltimore Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown. Rollins-Bey and Robert G. Moore claimed in separate trials the court lacked standing to hear their cases - a move the judge described as an attempt to frustrate the proceedings.
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NEWS
By Mona Charen | July 15, 2002
WASHINGTON - Here are two stories of Saudi-U.S. relations. Read them and judge who in this relationship is behaving as if it has the whip hand. As William McGurn reports in The Wall Street Journal, Monica Stowers, an American, married a young Saudi man she had met at the University of Dallas in the early 1980s. They had two children. When both children were still infants, the couple moved to Saudi Arabia. There, as Mr. McGurn writes, Ms. Stowers was in for a "nasty shock." Her husband was already married and had other children by his first wife.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Ian Ross | June 19, 2012
The recent crash of a $176 million Navy drone in a Chesapeake Bay marsh highlights a number of brewing issues over the domestic use of this new technology. Over the past decade, since the United States' invasion of Iraq and Afghanistan and framed by the Bush and Obama administrations' war on terror, the use of drones as both a surveillance tool and a means to kill insurgents has increased. This is a story about effective law enforcement, proper training, the associated costs - and the deadly consequences, intentional or not. Although there was some public consternation last year regarding the use of drones (also known as unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs)
NEWS
By Jeffrey Ian Ross | June 19, 2012
The recent crash of a $176 million Navy drone in a Chesapeake Bay marsh highlights a number of brewing issues over the domestic use of this new technology. Over the past decade, since the United States' invasion of Iraq and Afghanistan and framed by the Bush and Obama administrations' war on terror, the use of drones as both a surveillance tool and a means to kill insurgents has increased. This is a story about effective law enforcement, proper training, the associated costs - and the deadly consequences, intentional or not. Although there was some public consternation last year regarding the use of drones (also known as unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs)
NEWS
By Phillip J. Closius | June 4, 2012
The Golden Age of American legal education is dead. Every law dean knows it, but only some of them will feel it. Elite schools (the top 25 in U.S. News & World Report's rankings) and the 43 non-elite state "flagship" law schools are almost immune to market pressures. Those at risk will come from the other 132 law schools - the ones that produce the majority of law graduates. Law schools have increased tuition drastically for almost 20 years, beginning in the 1990s when universities refused to continue subsidizing the affordable public law schools.
NEWS
By William K. Marimow | January 29, 1995
'The Death of Common Sense: How Law is Suffocating America,' by Philip K. Howard, Random House, 202 pages, 18.00.Dr. Michael McGuire's skirmish with federal auditors started because the five-acre lawn at his UCLA research lab needed mowing. When the lab's lawn mower broke, McGuire promptly bought a replacement and told the grounds crew to save the old one for spare parts. Months later, during a routine audit of the lab, which is funded by the Veteran's Administration, federal officials were dismayed to learn - from McGuire himself - that the new lawn mower was purchased without the required approvals.
NEWS
July 25, 1997
IN HIS 34 years on the United States Supreme Court, Justice William J. Brennan made his presence felt in many ways. Appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, a Republican, Justice Brennan became an influential liberal, writing more opinions than any justice in the court's history except for the prolific Justice William O. Douglas.His opinions shaped key areas of the law, especially individual rights. From the principle of "one person, one vote," which has guided reapportionment of legislative and congressional districts, to access for prisoners, the poor and the disabled to legal remedies for discrimination or unconstitutional treatment, Justice Brennan's decisions reflected an unshakable belief that the liberties enshrined in the Bill of Rights take precedence over the prerogatives or convenience of government.
NEWS
By JOSEPH E. GREEN-BISHOP | June 6, 1993
Many who witnessed the climactic events in Waco think that all of the Branch Davidians were senseless "religious fanatics."I knew and corresponded with one who has been described as "second or third in command" of the group. His mannerisms were gentle, and he did not have a mean streak in his body. He was reserved, always polite and never prone to violence.Douglas Wayne Martin, the 42-year-old African-American Harvard trained lawyer, who perished on April 19th with three of his six children in the inferno that engulfed his religious group's living quarters ten miles from Waco, Texas, was a respectable and likable man.The last time that we talked, during a phone conversation two years ago, he said that things were going well for him, his wife, Sheila, and their children in that south Texas town.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a good-will gesture toward China, the Clinton administration has agreed to sell it a sophisticated $8 million supercomputer, senior administration officials said yesterday.The decision is part of the administration's strategy to embrace, rather than isolate, China despite disagreements over human rights, weapons proliferation and trade. The Clinton administration is determined to grab an ever-larger share of China's market, the fastest growing in the world, and reduce a trade deficit that could exceed that with Japan by the end of the decade.
NEWS
By Phillip J. Closius | June 4, 2012
The Golden Age of American legal education is dead. Every law dean knows it, but only some of them will feel it. Elite schools (the top 25 in U.S. News & World Report's rankings) and the 43 non-elite state "flagship" law schools are almost immune to market pressures. Those at risk will come from the other 132 law schools - the ones that produce the majority of law graduates. Law schools have increased tuition drastically for almost 20 years, beginning in the 1990s when universities refused to continue subsidizing the affordable public law schools.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | July 15, 2002
WASHINGTON - Here are two stories of Saudi-U.S. relations. Read them and judge who in this relationship is behaving as if it has the whip hand. As William McGurn reports in The Wall Street Journal, Monica Stowers, an American, married a young Saudi man she had met at the University of Dallas in the early 1980s. They had two children. When both children were still infants, the couple moved to Saudi Arabia. There, as Mr. McGurn writes, Ms. Stowers was in for a "nasty shock." Her husband was already married and had other children by his first wife.
NEWS
July 25, 1997
IN HIS 34 years on the United States Supreme Court, Justice William J. Brennan made his presence felt in many ways. Appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, a Republican, Justice Brennan became an influential liberal, writing more opinions than any justice in the court's history except for the prolific Justice William O. Douglas.His opinions shaped key areas of the law, especially individual rights. From the principle of "one person, one vote," which has guided reapportionment of legislative and congressional districts, to access for prisoners, the poor and the disabled to legal remedies for discrimination or unconstitutional treatment, Justice Brennan's decisions reflected an unshakable belief that the liberties enshrined in the Bill of Rights take precedence over the prerogatives or convenience of government.
NEWS
By William K. Marimow | January 29, 1995
'The Death of Common Sense: How Law is Suffocating America,' by Philip K. Howard, Random House, 202 pages, 18.00.Dr. Michael McGuire's skirmish with federal auditors started because the five-acre lawn at his UCLA research lab needed mowing. When the lab's lawn mower broke, McGuire promptly bought a replacement and told the grounds crew to save the old one for spare parts. Months later, during a routine audit of the lab, which is funded by the Veteran's Administration, federal officials were dismayed to learn - from McGuire himself - that the new lawn mower was purchased without the required approvals.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
Legislation drafted by Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin to update the 1917 Espionage Act has angered public disclosure advocates who say the proposal would make it harder for federal employees to expose government fraud and abuse. The bill would clarify a murky area of law to ensure that anyone who publicly leaks classified material could be prosecuted criminally, which is not necessarily the case today. The proposal also would make it illegal for government employees to violate nondisclosure agreements.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Three Thurgood Marshalls played bit parts in a small family drama at the Supreme Court yesterday.Grandfather Thurgood Marshall, a justice on the court since 1970 -- its first and only black member -- removed his robe, came down from the bench, and walked to the lawyer's lectern, occasionally leaning on a cane. He will be 83 next Tuesday.Addressing his colleagues in a brief but forceful way, the justice asked them to allow a lawyer to join the court's bar and practice there: his son, Thurgood Marshall Jr. At the same time, he asked that his daughter-in-law, Colleen P. Mahoney, Thurgood's wife, be admitted.
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