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NEWS
June 30, 1992
It might not incite the kind of rage caused more than 200 years ago by taxation without representation, but a decision recently made in London should leave Americans hopping mad.Officials in the British capital ruled that a baseball league for resident American youths would be barred from London's spacious Hampstead Heath. The officials said the noise and the traffic resulting from the games were ruining the woodland's pristine setting, though English children engage in cricket and soccer matches nearby.
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NEWS
By Ananya Bhattacharyya | June 3, 2014
As my 9-year-old son and I were enjoying a meal at a Lebanese cafe last month, I overheard a middle aged woman say to the server: "This is my first Memorial Day weekend alone. I'm separated, and the kids are with their dad. " The way in which she wore her heart on her sleeve was touching, as if she thought others might think something was amiss because she was dining alone. It reminded me of my own vulnerability when my marriage broke down several years ago. The server expressed her sympathy.
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NEWS
March 7, 2012
I have no idea what opportunities exist for Hakha Chin speakers in Baltimore, but it's good refugees understand job competition ("Short course in American life," March 3). Now let's find a way to train young Americans in the same game of musical chairs that the Baltimore Orientation Center provides. A six-year Gallup "World Poll" study on what most people all over the world desire discovered "what the whole world wants is a good job. " It's time Americans woke up to this worldwide job struggle.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
James Guyton plays basketball. But skiing? Not so much; especially since it means being out in the cold. When the Chesapeake Ski & Sports Club Inc. invites African-American teenagers to try a day on the slopes, members expect such resistance. It took some gentle prodding from counselors at the Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club of Metropolitan Baltimore before Guyton, 16, reluctantly agreed to try snowboarding - which seemed a little cooler. Wrapped up warmly in a red ski jacket and black pants borrowed from the local ski group, he stumbled his way down the bunny slope at the Whitetail Resort in Pennsylvania during the recent visit.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai | July 1, 2001
Independence Day gives kids another chance to celebrate freedom -- this time from the conventional reading that relegates books about great historical events onto dusty shelves, never to be opened unless absolutely necessary to pass a quiz. These books take innovative and often interactive approaches to engage young minds in learning more about those tumultuous Revolutionary times that led up to the holiday we celebrate every fourth of July. * "Shh! We're Writing the Constitution!" by Jean Fritz.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
Young Ho Kim, one of the coaches of the South Korea entry in the Cal Ripken World Series for 12-year-olds being played in Aberdeen, doesn't speak English, but knows the name of a certain former Orioles star. The sound of Ripken's name prompted a smile and thumbs-up gesture from Kim, while his team waited during yesterday's six-hour rain delay to play Mexico. The team may have wished the delay had lasted longer as Nestor Lopez Zamora ended up throwing a one-hitter against the Koreans as Mexico recorded a surprising 7-1 win. "People in Korea have a lot of respect for Cal and it's every kid's dream to be a baseball player like him," Kim said through interpreters.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
I've been meaning to comment on The Atlantic's thought-provoking cover story from a couple of weeks ago, "Why Women Still Can't Have It All," since I first read it. But I was kind of engrossed in getting my essay out in yesterday's paper, and I was fresh out of deep thoughts. Not to mention, a whole lot of other people got there first. But it's definitely worth a read -- in it, former director of policy planning at the State Department Anne-Marie Slaughter explains why she gave up her dream job to spend more time with her family, in the real way, not the euphemistic, "he or she was asked to leave the position" kind of way.  Then, this week, just as I was hoping to get settled back in and figure out my own deep thoughts on these issues, the great, conversation-starting articles just keep coming.
EXPLORE
October 18, 2012
Marylanders will soon vote on question 4, the DREAM Act. According to Calvin Ball's Oct. 11 column, we should vote "yes" on 4 because "all students (should) have access to the education they need. " I agree, Mr. Ball. But first, let us look at who won't have access to the $16,000 annual subsidy provided by in-state tuition. Citizens from other states will not get a break (and may be crowded out as non-resident slots fill). Legal immigrants with proper visas will not get a break. Maryland kids who transfer home after attending an out-of-state school will not get a break.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2005
American households with children have an average of 2.8 televisions. Ninety-seven percent of those households have one or more VCRs or DVD players. Two-thirds have at least one computer. If you think American kids are media-saturated, you're right. But if a new study conducted by the Bloomberg School of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University is to be believed, it's not the quantity that matters; it's where kids are being saturated. "We looked at the way kids use media and how it related to academic achievement," says Dina Borzekowski, lead author of "The Remote, The Mouse, and the No. 2 Pencil," a research paper on the project that was published in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine yesterday.
NEWS
By Ananya Bhattacharyya | June 3, 2014
As my 9-year-old son and I were enjoying a meal at a Lebanese cafe last month, I overheard a middle aged woman say to the server: "This is my first Memorial Day weekend alone. I'm separated, and the kids are with their dad. " The way in which she wore her heart on her sleeve was touching, as if she thought others might think something was amiss because she was dining alone. It reminded me of my own vulnerability when my marriage broke down several years ago. The server expressed her sympathy.
EXPLORE
October 18, 2012
Marylanders will soon vote on question 4, the DREAM Act. According to Calvin Ball's Oct. 11 column, we should vote "yes" on 4 because "all students (should) have access to the education they need. " I agree, Mr. Ball. But first, let us look at who won't have access to the $16,000 annual subsidy provided by in-state tuition. Citizens from other states will not get a break (and may be crowded out as non-resident slots fill). Legal immigrants with proper visas will not get a break. Maryland kids who transfer home after attending an out-of-state school will not get a break.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
I've been meaning to comment on The Atlantic's thought-provoking cover story from a couple of weeks ago, "Why Women Still Can't Have It All," since I first read it. But I was kind of engrossed in getting my essay out in yesterday's paper, and I was fresh out of deep thoughts. Not to mention, a whole lot of other people got there first. But it's definitely worth a read -- in it, former director of policy planning at the State Department Anne-Marie Slaughter explains why she gave up her dream job to spend more time with her family, in the real way, not the euphemistic, "he or she was asked to leave the position" kind of way.  Then, this week, just as I was hoping to get settled back in and figure out my own deep thoughts on these issues, the great, conversation-starting articles just keep coming.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
I have no idea what opportunities exist for Hakha Chin speakers in Baltimore, but it's good refugees understand job competition ("Short course in American life," March 3). Now let's find a way to train young Americans in the same game of musical chairs that the Baltimore Orientation Center provides. A six-year Gallup "World Poll" study on what most people all over the world desire discovered "what the whole world wants is a good job. " It's time Americans woke up to this worldwide job struggle.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2005
American households with children have an average of 2.8 televisions. Ninety-seven percent of those households have one or more VCRs or DVD players. Two-thirds have at least one computer. If you think American kids are media-saturated, you're right. But if a new study conducted by the Bloomberg School of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University is to be believed, it's not the quantity that matters; it's where kids are being saturated. "We looked at the way kids use media and how it related to academic achievement," says Dina Borzekowski, lead author of "The Remote, The Mouse, and the No. 2 Pencil," a research paper on the project that was published in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine yesterday.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
Young Ho Kim, one of the coaches of the South Korea entry in the Cal Ripken World Series for 12-year-olds being played in Aberdeen, doesn't speak English, but knows the name of a certain former Orioles star. The sound of Ripken's name prompted a smile and thumbs-up gesture from Kim, while his team waited during yesterday's six-hour rain delay to play Mexico. The team may have wished the delay had lasted longer as Nestor Lopez Zamora ended up throwing a one-hitter against the Koreans as Mexico recorded a surprising 7-1 win. "People in Korea have a lot of respect for Cal and it's every kid's dream to be a baseball player like him," Kim said through interpreters.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 2001
CLARKSVILLE resident Sue Wagner is on a mission. She wants to teach the Gospel to the Korean-American children of Howard County. Wagner says that many of them are latchkey kids who go home to an empty house. Often, their parents work and are not available to take them to activities. So they watch television and play computer games, she says. Many struggle in English classes, although they may do well in math and science. She envisions a Christian after-school program, in which children can go to a church and study, be tutored and receive spiritual guidance.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
James Guyton plays basketball. But skiing? Not so much; especially since it means being out in the cold. When the Chesapeake Ski & Sports Club Inc. invites African-American teenagers to try a day on the slopes, members expect such resistance. It took some gentle prodding from counselors at the Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club of Metropolitan Baltimore before Guyton, 16, reluctantly agreed to try snowboarding - which seemed a little cooler. Wrapped up warmly in a red ski jacket and black pants borrowed from the local ski group, he stumbled his way down the bunny slope at the Whitetail Resort in Pennsylvania during the recent visit.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 2001
CLARKSVILLE resident Sue Wagner is on a mission. She wants to teach the Gospel to the Korean-American children of Howard County. Wagner says that many of them are latchkey kids who go home to an empty house. Often, their parents work and are not available to take them to activities. So they watch television and play computer games, she says. Many struggle in English classes, although they may do well in math and science. She envisions a Christian after-school program, in which children can go to a church and study, be tutored and receive spiritual guidance.
NEWS
By Marian Wright Edelman | July 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - In less than the time it takes to read this newspaper, another 14 infants will be born into poverty in America. Another 10 will be born without health insurance. And one more child in our country will be neglected or abused. We are blessed to be living in a time of incredible opportunity and unprecedented prosperity. We have a $10 trillion economy, eight years of record economic growth and a projected multi-trillion-dollar federal budget surplus. As we enter the 21st century, America's strength reflects our courage, compassion, hard work, moral values and commitment to justice.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai | July 1, 2001
Independence Day gives kids another chance to celebrate freedom -- this time from the conventional reading that relegates books about great historical events onto dusty shelves, never to be opened unless absolutely necessary to pass a quiz. These books take innovative and often interactive approaches to engage young minds in learning more about those tumultuous Revolutionary times that led up to the holiday we celebrate every fourth of July. * "Shh! We're Writing the Constitution!" by Jean Fritz.
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