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By WARREN I. COHEN | January 2, 1994
Doubtless every American Jew -- and virtually all Americans -- hope Israel and the Palestinians will succeed in the current effort to achieve peace between them. And we eagerly look forward to the day when Syria and other Arab states formally accept Israel's right to exist within secure borders.It is now essential that American Jews recognize the extent to which they themselves have posed a major obstacle to peace for the peoples of Israel. It is time for them to remove that obstacle and support the peace process unambiguously.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Like many rabbis, David Greenspoon spends a lot of time performing services away from houses of worship - officiating weddings, presiding over bar and bat mitzvahs, visiting the sick. And he recently started noticing something odd: More and more people in these settings were telling him they belonged to no congregation at all. "If I ever joined a synagogue, it would have to have this, that, or the other," he said they'd confide. Greenspoon had run into a notable trend. Among the non-Orthodox, a solid majority of American Jews are unaffiliated with a synagogue today - an impediment for those who, like many, at least want to attend services during the High Holy Days, 10 days of sacred importance that begin Wednesday evening.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 11, 1995
NEW YORK -- The widow gently scolded and, her husband's successor, Prime Minister Shimon Peres of Israel, practically pleaded for unity yesterday as thousands of American Jews mourned the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin with a huge gathering at Madison Square Garden."
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | August 24, 2014
Recently, I was talking with a conservative friend of mine about the drama in Gaza. I knew this individual to be thoughtful about world events and staunchly pro-Israel in outlook. It was sometime after our mutual condemnation of Hamas that our conversation took an unexpected and disturbing turn. Seems my friend is frustrated with the Obama administration's tepid support of Benjamin Netanyahu's government and the Jewish voters who re-elected the U.S. president, a soft-on-Israel candidate.
NEWS
September 10, 2012
Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. engages in some wishful thinking about the political leanings of the American Jewish community ("Can Jews be sure of Obama's commitment to Israel?" Sept. 2). American Jews are the most consistently liberal religious group in the U.S. and have voted solidly Democratic for decades. While President Barack Obama's share of the Jewish vote may decline slightly from the 74 percent he received in 2008, all indicators suggest that he is likely to garner close to the 70 percent on average they have given to Democratic presidential candidates since 1972.
NEWS
By MICHAEL LERNER | November 21, 1991
Oakland, California. - Today, the media will join Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir in his yearly media hoax: ''proving'' that he has American Jewish support for his policies. Mr. Shamir is to appear at the annual conference of the big pro-Israel fund-raisers who assemble at the General Assembly of Jewish Federations in Baltimore.The fund-raisers will faithfully do their part by giving him a standing ovation. What the media will ignore is that these self-appointed leaders, like much of the Jewish establishment, are wildly out of step with the majority of American Jews.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | October 31, 1991
Thousands of delegates representing Reform Judaism in North America begin meetings today in Baltimore excited by the Middle East peace conference but also skittish about how American Jews should respond to the talks in Madrid, Spain.The Union of American Hebrew Congregations (UAHC), which expects nearly 4,000 delegates to attend its biennial convention, has long expressed disagreement with Israel's Likud government over such matters as Palestinian rights and settlements in occupied territories.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 18, 1997
JERUSALEM -- As Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu prepares for a visit to the United States next month, a controversy over the role of non-Orthodox Jews is again threatening to erupt in Israel that could set off a new crisis with American Jews.Leaders of the Reform and Conservative movements, who represent a minority in Israel but are the majority among American Jews, reacted with alarm Wednesday to reports that Netanyahu will back legislation that will strengthen Orthodox control over religious affairs in Israel.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2002
Rabbi Ervin Preis, spiritual leader of the Suburban Orthodox Toras Chaim congregation in Pikesville for more than 26 years and a guiding force in the Baltimore-area Orthodox Jewish community, died at his home yesterday of bile duct cancer. He was 67. Rabbi Preis had been struggling with cancer for two years, but he led daily services through his last days. After moving to the red-brick Pikesville synagogue in 1976, Rabbi Preis shepherded the congregation as its members grew more deeply observant.
NEWS
By ROBERT J. LOEWENBERG | May 29, 1992
New York. -- Watersheds in history like watersheds elsewhere are easy to miss. With cameras focused in on domestic unrest and historic international changes, the far-reaching importance of Mr. Bush's denial of loan guarantees to Israel is about to be overlooked.This denial heralds the decline in the political fortunes of U.S. Jews and of Israel. American Jews have been slow to credit the decline or its source. It is ''socialism'' in the broadest sense, both the Israeli commitment to it and the identification of U.S. Jews with it. The denial of the guarantees has begun to bring all of this home.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
When she was in 10th grade, Risa Kelemer made up her mind: She wanted to serve in the army. The Israeli army. A member of Congregation Shomrei Emunah in Greenspring and a student at Yeshivat Rambam in Park Heights, the Baltimore native visited the Jewish state regularly throughout her childhood. She left her family to spend 10th grade at a school in Haifa. On returning home, she took up running to build strength and endurance, and began contacting authorities to ask about enlisting in the Israel Defense Forces.
NEWS
September 10, 2012
Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. engages in some wishful thinking about the political leanings of the American Jewish community ("Can Jews be sure of Obama's commitment to Israel?" Sept. 2). American Jews are the most consistently liberal religious group in the U.S. and have voted solidly Democratic for decades. While President Barack Obama's share of the Jewish vote may decline slightly from the 74 percent he received in 2008, all indicators suggest that he is likely to garner close to the 70 percent on average they have given to Democratic presidential candidates since 1972.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
While I agree that how President Obama (or any president) might respond to an Israeli military strike in Iran is an important topic for any voter to consider, including Jewish voters, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich's rambling discussion of the topic is way off the mark ("Can Jews be sure of Obama's commitment to Israel," Sept. 2). He seems of touch with most American Jewish voters. To suggest that Jewish citizens vote Democrat out of "habit" is insulting. Jewish voters are not one-issue voters (i.e.
NEWS
By James W. Dale | May 3, 2012
The "divestment from companies working In Israel" bandwagon is rolling again in several Protestant denominations, among them my own, the Presbyterian Church (USA). In one way, that's a good thing. It does ask us to pay attention to Israel and the West Bank/Gaza, when the Israeli government wants to focus our attention on Iran, and as a side effect get us to ignore the ongoing travesty of the occupation. Nonetheless, divestment as a tactic for dealing with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is a bad idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
A couple years ago, African-American artist Loring Cornish was focusing his creativity on works that addressed the civil rights movement. When a Jewish couple, Ellen and Paul Saval, bought some other pieces of his, Cornish went to their home to hang the art. By the time he was finished, "something came over me," he said. "I don't what it was. But I realized then that I had to include the struggles of the Jewish people in my work about the African-American experience. I went home, flipped over the 8-by-8(-foot)
NEWS
By Arthur Blecher | December 12, 2007
It's hard to imagine a cozier holiday scene than the whole family gathered together to trim the tree. But for 2.5 million Americans in Jewish-Christian households, this is a scenario fraught with tension and feelings of betrayal. As the rabbi of a congregation that is more than half interfaith couples, I have learned that the holiday season is an especially difficult time for people with multiple religions in their household. More often than not, the gentile partner grew up with Christmas cheer in the home, but the Jewish partner learned to view traditions such as Christmas carols and holiday wreaths as "un-Jewish."
NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | April 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It is the week of Passover, the first festival of human freedom. In many ways Jews have never had it so good, and much of their good fortune is associated with freedom. But Jews have some monumental problems -- some perennial, some self-inflicted and some linked to liberty.Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin "Bibi" Netanyahu will remain in office, not indicted for "breach of trust." But there is still an alleged crisis in the peace process. Notwithstanding, those negotiations have been generally fruitful, extending Israel's survivability as a free nation in a rough neighborhood.
NEWS
By Muqtedar Khan | May 21, 2001
ADRIAN, Mich. -- There were several reasons why American Muslims voted for George W. Bush in November. Chief among them was the perception that both Bill Clinton and Al Gore were too heavily invested with the Israeli lobby to adopt a balanced approach to the Palestinian issue. American Muslims felt that Mr. Bush would not only assume a more balanced attitude toward Palestinians but would also reduce the colonization of the peace process by American Jews. They felt that since all the important foreign policy positions were held by American Jews, some of whom, like the U.S. ambassador to Israel, Martin Indyk, had a long history of lobbying for Israel, it was impossible to expect Democrats to be evenhanded toward Palestine.
NEWS
By Jonathan Tilove and Jonathan Tilove,Special to The Sun | November 19, 2006
OK, so George Allen won't be returning to the U.S. Senate in January, and chances are he'll never occupy the White House. But, at the end of what had to be one of the worst weeks of his life, the Jewish newspaper the Forward named Allen the 51st member of its annual Forward 50 list of the most influential American Jews. It was the Forward that earlier this year revealed the Virginia Republican's Jewish roots, and Allen's flustered response may have contributed to his narrow defeat and the Democratic takeover of the Senate.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
Rabbi Noah Golinkin, the former spiritual leader of a Columbia synagogue who earned a national reputation for programs that taught Hebrew literacy to more than 150,000 Jewish adults, died Thursday at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center & Hospital of complications after surgery. The Columbia resident was 89. His one-day Hebrew Reading Marathon and its forerunner, the Hebrew Literacy Campaign, are credited with quickly giving adults enough knowledge of the language to follow the Hebrew prayer book.
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