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By New York Times News Service ,,HC B | May 12, 1991
Tours of Poland that will focus on genealogical research, especially among Polish archival material, are being sponsored by the American Jewish Congress.The tours, called "Routes to Roots," will take participants into branches of the Polish State Archives throughout Poland, including the archives at Auschwitz and Birkenau. Photocopying, photographing and videotaping will be allowed.The tours will also feature lectures, cultural events and guided tours of historically important Jewish sites in Warsaw, Cracow and Lublin.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 12, 2003
NEARLY THREE years after Jack L. Levin died, his friends still remember him as one of Baltimore's great angry men. What was he angry about? It's Brando's response in The Wild One. "What are you rebelling against, Johnny?" "Whadaya got?" he answered. Levin was the go-to guy for all political underdogs scraped up along life's highway. He made a living in the advertising business but made a life out of good fights: marching, lobbying, organizing, writing. His anger came out of an emotionally troubled youth and the routine unfairness he witnessed in adulthood.
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SPORTS
By New York Daily News | April 13, 1994
NEW YORK -- Steve Carlton, who spent most of his baseball career not speaking to the media, is in hot water for recently published remarks.In the April issue of Philadelphia magazine, Carlton is quoted as making anti-Semitic references while talking about world revolution. Carlton's remarks angered the American Jewish Congress, which is demanding the Hall of Fame electee apologize for his "blatant and unconscionable bigotry."David Kahn, president of the Jewish organization, wrote letters to the baseball establishment urging "that any further Hall of Fame induction plans for Mr. Carlton [July 31]
FEATURES
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2003
Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg, Judaic scholar, social activist and former president of the American Jewish Congress, walked down the North Collington Street block of his boyhood East Baltimore neighborhood on a recent blustery winter morning and recalled his Hasidic roots. "There was the house of the saintliest of the Baltimore rabbis of that era, Rabbi Axelrod," he said, standing before a brick rowhouse. He pointed out the Formstone-covered facade that was the home to a rabbi, who had been chaplain to the predecessor to Sinai Hospital.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2002
Chiae Herzig, a former school administrator active in Baltimore's Jewish community and the local Democratic Party, died of a heart attack Friday at her home in Cheswolde. She was 82. Since moving to Baltimore in 1966, Mrs. Herzig performed extensive volunteer work for various Jewish organizations. She was the first female president of Temple Emanuel of Baltimore synagogue and former co-president of the National Women's Division of the American Jewish Council. Born Chiae Wolpaw in Cleveland, she graduated with a bachelor's degree in psychology from Case Western Reserve University in 1942.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - Senate Republicans seized upon the turmoil in the Middle East as an argument yesterday for President Bush's proposal to open a protected Alaskan wildlife refuge to oil exploration. The turmoil has "increased the importance of moving an energy bill off the floor" of the Senate, said Republican Sen. Frank Murkowski of Alaska, the chief sponsor of Bush's plan to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling. Senate Republicans held a news conference with several Jewish groups, including B'nai B'rith International and the American Jewish Congress, to promote drilling in ANWR during a "Holocaust Days of Remembrance Ceremony" in the Capitol Rotunda, featuring Bush national security adviser Condoleezza Rice.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge in Texas, ruling that Congress has no power to second-guess the Supreme Court's constitutional rulings, struck down yesterday a 1993 law designed to protect religion against government interference.U.S. District Judge Lucius D. Bunton III of Midland said that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act was intended to overrule a 1990 Supreme Court decision, but he said Congress cannot undo a constitutional ruling by passing a law.This was the first time a federal court had ruled against a law that is highly popular with many religious sects and denominations.
NEWS
November 11, 1992
Louis E. Shecter, a longtime Baltimore promoter and advertising executive who owned movie theaters and bowling alleys, died Monday of cancer at his home in the Suburban Oaks Apartments.Services for Mr. Shecter, who was 91, were to be held at 1 p.m. today at Sol Levinson & Bros., 6010 Reisterstown Road.At the time of his death he remained a partner in the public relations firm of Shecter and Levin, which he started in 1931 with Jack L. Levin, a brother-in-law.Among his most cherished accomplishments was working with the American Jewish Congress for the ratification of the Genocide Convention, which was eventually adopted by the United Nations.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 12, 2003
NEARLY THREE years after Jack L. Levin died, his friends still remember him as one of Baltimore's great angry men. What was he angry about? It's Brando's response in The Wild One. "What are you rebelling against, Johnny?" "Whadaya got?" he answered. Levin was the go-to guy for all political underdogs scraped up along life's highway. He made a living in the advertising business but made a life out of good fights: marching, lobbying, organizing, writing. His anger came out of an emotionally troubled youth and the routine unfairness he witnessed in adulthood.
NEWS
By MONA CHAREN | September 5, 1995
Washington. -- The American Jewish Congress, always among the more liberal Jewish organizations, has shamed itself with a fund-raising letter that appeals to the worst prejudices of its intended audience.It begins with a quote from the New York Times (the source, be it op-ed, editorial or news story is not specified).''No longer does the religious right seek to isolate schoolchildren in supposed 'voluntary' classroom prayer. Now it seeks openly to engulf all of us -- treating adults the same as children -- in supporting, with taxes and public space and public resources, the religious observances that Ralph Reed and Pat Robertson think are right for us.''The looming danger cannot be exaggerated, according to the AJC. ''Today as we approach the 1996 presidential election, the political reality is that in almost half the states, the Christian Coalition controls the apparatus of the Republican Party.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2002
Chiae Herzig, a former school administrator active in Baltimore's Jewish community and the local Democratic Party, died of a heart attack Friday at her home in Cheswolde. She was 82. Since moving to Baltimore in 1966, Mrs. Herzig performed extensive volunteer work for various Jewish organizations. She was the first female president of Temple Emanuel of Baltimore synagogue and former co-president of the National Women's Division of the American Jewish Council. Born Chiae Wolpaw in Cleveland, she graduated with a bachelor's degree in psychology from Case Western Reserve University in 1942.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - Senate Republicans seized upon the turmoil in the Middle East as an argument yesterday for President Bush's proposal to open a protected Alaskan wildlife refuge to oil exploration. The turmoil has "increased the importance of moving an energy bill off the floor" of the Senate, said Republican Sen. Frank Murkowski of Alaska, the chief sponsor of Bush's plan to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling. Senate Republicans held a news conference with several Jewish groups, including B'nai B'rith International and the American Jewish Congress, to promote drilling in ANWR during a "Holocaust Days of Remembrance Ceremony" in the Capitol Rotunda, featuring Bush national security adviser Condoleezza Rice.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Hundreds of people from a variety of ethnic groups gathered here yesterday to try to build tolerance in a "Day of Dialogue" on race relations, an event touted by Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr. as a first step toward easing racial and ethnic tensions in this city.But the gathering was disrupted by the very tensions it was trying to heal, with black and Jewish participants clashing before and during the afternoon event at the D.C. Convention Center.In a speech to the conference, Barry tried to rise above the friction.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1996
Jack L. Levin is 83 now. His heart runs on batteries, he's lost 95 percent of his eyesight and his hearing is impaired. But he still works four days a week at his downtown advertising business, and he's collecting a passel of awards for a lifetime of work for civil liberties and human rights.Mr. Levin suffers what he calls "my various decompositions" with good humor. "My cardiologist, my ophthalmologist, my internist and my urologist are all spreading the word," he says.A self-described "incorrigible do-gooder," he's been involved in an abundance of social causes since he graduated from City College in 1928.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and and Norris P. West and JoAnna Daemmrich and and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1995
With its future of policing big-city housing projects on the line, the Nation of Islam's security enterprise vowed yesterday to fight to stay in Baltimore and blamed pressure from Congress and Jewish groups for a federal order revoking its contract here.The day after Baltimore officials reluctantly agreed to hire another company, the Nation of Islam Security Agency announced plans to sue the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in an attempt to keep NOI's disciplined guards patrolling the public high-rise buildings.
NEWS
By MONA CHAREN | September 5, 1995
Washington. -- The American Jewish Congress, always among the more liberal Jewish organizations, has shamed itself with a fund-raising letter that appeals to the worst prejudices of its intended audience.It begins with a quote from the New York Times (the source, be it op-ed, editorial or news story is not specified).''No longer does the religious right seek to isolate schoolchildren in supposed 'voluntary' classroom prayer. Now it seeks openly to engulf all of us -- treating adults the same as children -- in supporting, with taxes and public space and public resources, the religious observances that Ralph Reed and Pat Robertson think are right for us.''The looming danger cannot be exaggerated, according to the AJC. ''Today as we approach the 1996 presidential election, the political reality is that in almost half the states, the Christian Coalition controls the apparatus of the Republican Party.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Hundreds of people from a variety of ethnic groups gathered here yesterday to try to build tolerance in a "Day of Dialogue" on race relations, an event touted by Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr. as a first step toward easing racial and ethnic tensions in this city.But the gathering was disrupted by the very tensions it was trying to heal, with black and Jewish participants clashing before and during the afternoon event at the D.C. Convention Center.In a speech to the conference, Barry tried to rise above the friction.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | September 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Jewish nurse from Baltimore and the Palestinian publicist from East Jerusalem met at a hunger strike in 1982.They had come to Lafayette Park across from the White House to protest the Israeli invasion of Lebanon. They left fast friends, comrades in a struggle to bring together Jews and Palestinians.Last night, Ellen Siegel and Aida Abuzayyad met again in a hotel ballroom, embracing only hours after Yitzhak Rabin, the prime minister of Israel, and Yasser Arafat, the chairman of the PLO, shook hands to seal a historic peace agreement.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge in Texas, ruling that Congress has no power to second-guess the Supreme Court's constitutional rulings, struck down yesterday a 1993 law designed to protect religion against government interference.U.S. District Judge Lucius D. Bunton III of Midland said that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act was intended to overrule a 1990 Supreme Court decision, but he said Congress cannot undo a constitutional ruling by passing a law.This was the first time a federal court had ruled against a law that is highly popular with many religious sects and denominations.
SPORTS
By New York Daily News | April 13, 1994
NEW YORK -- Steve Carlton, who spent most of his baseball career not speaking to the media, is in hot water for recently published remarks.In the April issue of Philadelphia magazine, Carlton is quoted as making anti-Semitic references while talking about world revolution. Carlton's remarks angered the American Jewish Congress, which is demanding the Hall of Fame electee apologize for his "blatant and unconscionable bigotry."David Kahn, president of the Jewish organization, wrote letters to the baseball establishment urging "that any further Hall of Fame induction plans for Mr. Carlton [July 31]
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