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NEWS
May 20, 1991
Sholom D. Comay, 53, who was re-elected this month to a second term as president of the American Jewish Committee, died of a heart attack Saturday while driving with his wife in Pittsburgh. Mr. Comay practiced law in Pittsburgh for 12 years before joining Action Industries Inc., which markets promotional programs to retailers. He eventually became chairman of the company's board of directors. The committee, which was founded in 1906 to battle anti-Semitism, has offices in New York, Washington and Jerusalem.
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FEATURES
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
Few films have generated as much controversy before audiences have seen it as Mel Gibson's The Passion of Christ. Jewish leaders began criticizing the movie months ago, saying it contains "dangerous" teachings that blame Jews for the death of Christ - a centuries-old charge the Vatican formally disavowed nearly four decades ago. "The Jews are the heavies in these medieval Passion plays over and over again," Rabbi A. James Rudin told an interfaith group...
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NEWS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,Staff Writer | July 13, 1993
Marie L. Rothschild, a longtime leader in the Jewish community and in Baltimore in general, died Saturday of respiratory failure at her home in the Park Towers West Apartments on Park Heights Avenue.Mrs. Rothschild, who was 90, held many posts in the Associated Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore. She was the first woman to serve on the board of Sinai Hospital and was active in the Baltimore Regional Chapter of the American Red Cross and other groups.Darrell Friedman, president of the Associated, described her as "a very caring and committed leader."
NEWS
January 24, 2003
Burns W. "Bud" Roper, 77, a leading pollster for four decades and the author of political polling's central question about the state of the nation, died of lung cancer Monday at his home in Bourne, Mass., on Cape Cod. It was Mr. Roper who first asked Americans if they thought "things in this country are generally going in the right direction" or had "seriously gotten off on the wrong track." It is now a staple of polling questionnaires. Mr. Roper, who attended Yale University, got into polling on his return from Army Air Forces service in World War II -- joining Elmo Roper & Associates, the New York-based company founded by his father in 1933.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 1996
The religious right political movement has considerable opportunity for future growth because many of its prime potential constituents, politically-conservative evangelicals, are unfamiliar with the movement and unaware of some of its leaders, according to a poll commissioned by the American Jewish Committee.For example, only 38 percent of the nation's conservative evangelicals say they have read or heard much about the religious right; fewer than half say they support it.While 74 percent know enough about Pat Robertson -- the founder of the Christian Coalition, which is one of the most prominent organizations in the movement -- to give him a rating, only 18 percent know enough about Ralph Reed, the executive director of the coalition, to rate him.The national poll, commissioned by the American Jewish Committee and conducted by the Gallup International Institute, screened a much larger group to identify 507 conservative evangelicals and 503 other Americans, representing the rest of society.
NEWS
November 29, 1995
Annemarie Arnod Shimony, 67, a leading scholar of American Indians and a founder of the Peace Studies program at Wellesley College, died Sunday in Wellesley, Mass., at 67. Her research and publications on the Iroquois spanned a period of 40 years and documented major changes in Iroquois society, earning her a position of respect within the scholarly community and among the Iroquois.Leon Zitrone, 81, a popular French journalist who for more than 30 years announced major events on French television, from the crowning of Queen Elizabeth II to the funeral of Charles de Gaulle, died in Paris on Saturday.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1997
Catholic and Jewish speakers at a conference on the role of religion in politics and society found yesterday that many of their ideas mesh, but they diverged on one major issue: school vouchers.At the conference in Baltimore, a representative of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops advocated the use of vouchers to send African-American children to inner-city Catholic schools."If there is a societal will that the urgencies of the inner city are such that they need to be addressed, one can and ought to work together in the local community to find a constitutionally agreed way to exploit the resources of the Catholic schools that remain open in those communities," said Eugene J. Fisher, director of Catholic-Jewish relations for the Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops.
FEATURES
By Tamar Lewin and Tamar Lewin,New York Times | January 8, 1992
TOLERANCE of ethnicity seems to be rising and anti-Semitism dropping, according to a study of polls conducted over several years by seven national polling organizations in which people were asked to describe or rank different ethnic groups. The study was made public yesterday.The new analysis of existing polling data, sponsored by the American Jewish Committee, provides intriguing glimpses of the images, social standing and conflicts that different ethnic groups are generally perceived to have.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1999
Relations between Roman Catholics and Jews -- a difficult and often ugly history of 2,000 years that began to heal after the Second Vatican Council -- got a boost in Baltimore last night from prominent priests and rabbis even as lingering conflicts were acknowledged.The modern relationship, based on a 1965 Vatican edict repudiating the belief that Jews are collectively guilty for killing Jesus of Nazareth, was affirmed last night at St. Mary's Seminary as "one of the greatest revolutions in human history."
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1998
The Marine Corps said yesterday that a Marine claiming he deserted from Aberdeen Proving Ground because of ethnic discrimination may have concocted that story to get out of a military career with which he was disillusioned.Pfc. Joshua Narins, 26, had told roommates, fellow soldiers and officers at Aberdeen that he was not adapting to military life and was looking for a way out, according to a preliminary investigation of Narins' harassment claims.Narins, who enlisted in May and was based at Aberdeen's weapons school, said he went AWOL in mid-February after finding an ethnic slur written on the nameplate on his barracks door.
TOPIC
By John Rivera | October 29, 2000
FOR THE PAST several weeks, Jewish and Christian religious circles across the nation and beyond have been abuzz about a document issued by a group in Baltimore. "Dabru Emet: A Jewish Statement on Christians and Christianity" -- which is commonly being referred to as "The Baltimore Document" -- has drawn praise, criticism and outright denunciation for its optimistic portrayal of the present and future of Christian-Jewish relations. The statement is especially controversial in the Jewish community because it states that Christian attitudes toward Judaism have improved so much in the past generation that Jews must reassess their conception and relationship with the Christian community.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1999
Relations between Roman Catholics and Jews -- a difficult and often ugly history of 2,000 years that began to heal after the Second Vatican Council -- got a boost in Baltimore last night from prominent priests and rabbis even as lingering conflicts were acknowledged.The modern relationship, based on a 1965 Vatican edict repudiating the belief that Jews are collectively guilty for killing Jesus of Nazareth, was affirmed last night at St. Mary's Seminary as "one of the greatest revolutions in human history."
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1998
The Marine Corps said yesterday that a Marine claiming he deserted from Aberdeen Proving Ground because of ethnic discrimination may have concocted that story to get out of a military career with which he was disillusioned.Pfc. Joshua Narins, 26, had told roommates, fellow soldiers and officers at Aberdeen that he was not adapting to military life and was looking for a way out, according to a preliminary investigation of Narins' harassment claims.Narins, who enlisted in May and was based at Aberdeen's weapons school, said he went AWOL in mid-February after finding an ethnic slur written on the nameplate on his barracks door.
NEWS
By Mona Charen PPTC | June 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Speaking to a conference on Judaism and conservatism a couple of years ago, I began my remarks by noting that Jews are the most religious people in America -- unfortunately, their religion is liberalism.I was joking. But Elliott Abrams' eye-opening new book, ''Faith or Fear,'' proves, to my astonishment, that it is quite literally true. The overwhelming majority of the dwindling American Jewish population has all but abandoned traditional Jewish religious observance -- the dietary laws, keeping the Sabbath and attending synagogue.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1997
Catholic and Jewish speakers at a conference on the role of religion in politics and society found yesterday that many of their ideas mesh, but they diverged on one major issue: school vouchers.At the conference in Baltimore, a representative of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops advocated the use of vouchers to send African-American children to inner-city Catholic schools."If there is a societal will that the urgencies of the inner city are such that they need to be addressed, one can and ought to work together in the local community to find a constitutionally agreed way to exploit the resources of the Catholic schools that remain open in those communities," said Eugene J. Fisher, director of Catholic-Jewish relations for the Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 1996
The religious right political movement has considerable opportunity for future growth because many of its prime potential constituents, politically-conservative evangelicals, are unfamiliar with the movement and unaware of some of its leaders, according to a poll commissioned by the American Jewish Committee.For example, only 38 percent of the nation's conservative evangelicals say they have read or heard much about the religious right; fewer than half say they support it.While 74 percent know enough about Pat Robertson -- the founder of the Christian Coalition, which is one of the most prominent organizations in the movement -- to give him a rating, only 18 percent know enough about Ralph Reed, the executive director of the coalition, to rate him.The national poll, commissioned by the American Jewish Committee and conducted by the Gallup International Institute, screened a much larger group to identify 507 conservative evangelicals and 503 other Americans, representing the rest of society.
NEWS
January 24, 2003
Burns W. "Bud" Roper, 77, a leading pollster for four decades and the author of political polling's central question about the state of the nation, died of lung cancer Monday at his home in Bourne, Mass., on Cape Cod. It was Mr. Roper who first asked Americans if they thought "things in this country are generally going in the right direction" or had "seriously gotten off on the wrong track." It is now a staple of polling questionnaires. Mr. Roper, who attended Yale University, got into polling on his return from Army Air Forces service in World War II -- joining Elmo Roper & Associates, the New York-based company founded by his father in 1933.
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P. L. Somerville | May 12, 1995
"Religion in the Public Schools" is the subject of a seminar for teachers, clergy and parents to be held May 31 at St. Mary's Seminary and University, 5400 Roland Ave.Speakers and discussion leaders will bring Jewish, Protestant and Roman Catholic perspectives to the questions of how and whether religious values should be taught to public school students.The 3:30 p.m.-to-6 p.m. program is co-sponsored by the Baltimore chapter of the American Jewish Committee and the Ecumenical Institute at the seminary.
NEWS
May 3, 1996
Rose H. Turk, 81, Teacher, homemakerRose H. Turk, a homemaker and former elementary school teacher, died Wednesday of a heart attack at her Pikesville residence. She was 81.She taught in Baltimore City schools from 1935 to 1944, leaving to raise a family.Interested in sculpting and painting, she studied at Maryland Institute, College of Art and the Baltimore Museum of Art. She also wrote poetry.She was born Rose Himmelfarb in South Baltimore. A 1932 graduate of Southern High School, she earned a teaching degree from then-Towson State College in 1935.
NEWS
November 29, 1995
Annemarie Arnod Shimony, 67, a leading scholar of American Indians and a founder of the Peace Studies program at Wellesley College, died Sunday in Wellesley, Mass., at 67. Her research and publications on the Iroquois spanned a period of 40 years and documented major changes in Iroquois society, earning her a position of respect within the scholarly community and among the Iroquois.Leon Zitrone, 81, a popular French journalist who for more than 30 years announced major events on French television, from the crowning of Queen Elizabeth II to the funeral of Charles de Gaulle, died in Paris on Saturday.
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