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By Misha Glenny | April 30, 1993
Belgrade -- THE chorus of American voices calling for $H intervention against Serbia continues to swell, with influential Democrats such as Sen. Joseph Biden echoing Republican criticism of President Clinton's cautious approach.Even Boris Yeltsin chimed in on Tuesday, warning the Serbs, "The time has come for decisive measures to quell the conflict."But those who seek quick retribution for atrocities should appreciate that military action directed solely at Serbs in Bosnia will unleash a wider war across the Balkans.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 27, 2013
President Barack Obama, in a sea of foreign policy troubles, accepted his leadership responsibilities in a CNN interview last week while lamenting the complexity of these challenges. He noted the old Harry Truman dictum that "the buck stops" in the Oval Office and asserted U.S. power and influence in the world must be "in our long-term national interests. " He mentioned both in the context of the developing civil wars in Egypt and Syria and growing calls for American intervention. The reports that chemical weapons were used by the regime in Syria against the insurgents, he said, "starts getting to some core national interests that the United States has, both in terms of us making sure that weapons of mass destruction are not proliferating, as well as needing to protect our allies [and]
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | September 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A surge of optimism surrounding Syrian-Israeli peace talks dissipated swiftly yesterday in a rupture over the central question of trading land for peace.Saying Israel had refused to discuss land, Syria declared the negotiations at an impasse and demanded American intervention.But Israelis, together with the United States, downplayed the significance of yesterday's failure, which contrasted sharply with upbeat accounts of progress the day before from both Israel and Syria.Syria's outburst marked an effort both to pressure Israel for concessions and to shore up Arab unity, threatened by lack of progress in parallel talks between Israel and Palestinians.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
Your article about Marylanders of Syrian descent imploring the U.S. government to provide humanitarian aid and arms to the Free Syrian Army correctly cited President Bashar Assad's ruthless attacks on his civilian opponents ("Marylanders helping cause in their Syrian homeland," July 7). Yet the report completely ignored the horrific slaughter of Christians by radical Islamist members of the FSA, whose stated goal is not just the ouster of Mr. Assad, but the imposition of strict Sharia law in Syria.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
Your article about Marylanders of Syrian descent imploring the U.S. government to provide humanitarian aid and arms to the Free Syrian Army correctly cited President Bashar Assad's ruthless attacks on his civilian opponents ("Marylanders helping cause in their Syrian homeland," July 7). Yet the report completely ignored the horrific slaughter of Christians by radical Islamist members of the FSA, whose stated goal is not just the ouster of Mr. Assad, but the imposition of strict Sharia law in Syria.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
Sunday night, many Americans watched the Academy Awards; celebrating Hollywood's finest, analyzing red carpet entrances, and critiquing stars' fashion choices. For a few hours we are offered a glimpse into a world of glitter and wealth foreign to most Americans. For many people, the Oscars offer a welcome distraction from the impending sequestration, the bitter partisan political atmosphere, the economic downturn, and the myriad crises playing out around the world. The Oscars acknowledge the year's top film professionals, from actors and directors, to cinematographers and editors.
NEWS
March 9, 1993
At least U.S. high level airdrops of food and medicine are finally reaching Bosnian Muslims being raped and starved and tortured and murdered to force them to flee their homes rather than falling into the hands of thugs in Serbian uniform.President Clinton has learned hard lessons since the easy days of the campaign when all that was required was to take the moral high ground, which demanded tangible help to Bosnian Muslims. As president he has learned what President Bush knew, that Americans show no signs of wanting to launch a costly war in Bosnia and that European allies do not want American intervention to provoke reprisals against vulnerable European peace-keeping troops.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHMOOKLER | January 19, 1995
Broadway, Virginia. -- Sometimes it's the way we pose a problem that makes a solution hard to find. Take the question of American intervention in the world's trouble spots.The argument usually breaks down into two sides. In the recent Haitian case, there were those who said, ''It's a Haitian problem, let's stay out of it.'' While others said, ''Only the U.S. can set things right, we've got to go in.''Neither side is persuaded by the other's case. To say, as some senators did, that this is a problem for the Haitian people to resolve (or the Somali people, or whoever)
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | December 14, 1992
Paris. -- Policy makers think in metaphors, and for American interventions abroad, the metaphors are few: Vietnam, Lebanon, the Persian Gulf.Each is supposed to supply something useful in making decisions about Somalia and Bosnia, or Azerbaijan-Armenia, Trans-Caucasia, Cambodia, Burma, Sudan, Liberia -- not to speak of Mozambique, where U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali has just asked for 750 more good men to put up the U.N.'s colors and keep...
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 18, 2004
IT'S BEEN over a week since the hurricane rightly called Ivan the Terrible ripped through Grenada, destroyed or damaged 90 percent of the homes and left at least 39 people dead and thousands homeless. Electricity was kaput. I've heard that phone service has been restored, but I still haven't been able to get in touch with the one Grenadian I hope was not among the 39 fatalities. My list of heroes is a short one, but Leslie Pierre sits at the very top of it. Pierre is the founder, publisher and editor of The Grenadian Voice, a newspaper he started in the early 1980s in direct defiance of the Provisional Revolutionary Government, which was run by devotees of the Marxist New Jewel Movement.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 10, 2013
In Hillary Clinton's farewell remarks in February on stepping down as President Barack Obama's secretary of state, she echoed one of her predecessors, Madeleine Albright, declaring America to be "the indispensable nation. " "We are the force for progress, prosperity and peace," Mrs. Clinton elaborated. "And because we have to get it right for ourselves. " Ms. Albright had put it this way: "If we have to use force, it is because we are America. We are the indispensable nation.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
Sunday night, many Americans watched the Academy Awards; celebrating Hollywood's finest, analyzing red carpet entrances, and critiquing stars' fashion choices. For a few hours we are offered a glimpse into a world of glitter and wealth foreign to most Americans. For many people, the Oscars offer a welcome distraction from the impending sequestration, the bitter partisan political atmosphere, the economic downturn, and the myriad crises playing out around the world. The Oscars acknowledge the year's top film professionals, from actors and directors, to cinematographers and editors.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 18, 2004
IT'S BEEN over a week since the hurricane rightly called Ivan the Terrible ripped through Grenada, destroyed or damaged 90 percent of the homes and left at least 39 people dead and thousands homeless. Electricity was kaput. I've heard that phone service has been restored, but I still haven't been able to get in touch with the one Grenadian I hope was not among the 39 fatalities. My list of heroes is a short one, but Leslie Pierre sits at the very top of it. Pierre is the founder, publisher and editor of The Grenadian Voice, a newspaper he started in the early 1980s in direct defiance of the Provisional Revolutionary Government, which was run by devotees of the Marxist New Jewel Movement.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHMOOKLER | January 19, 1995
Broadway, Virginia. -- Sometimes it's the way we pose a problem that makes a solution hard to find. Take the question of American intervention in the world's trouble spots.The argument usually breaks down into two sides. In the recent Haitian case, there were those who said, ''It's a Haitian problem, let's stay out of it.'' While others said, ''Only the U.S. can set things right, we've got to go in.''Neither side is persuaded by the other's case. To say, as some senators did, that this is a problem for the Haitian people to resolve (or the Somali people, or whoever)
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | September 22, 1994
Paris.--The fun has only begun in Haiti, a place easier to get to than to leave. The purpose of the American intervention is to ''restore'' democracy. The democracy that previously existed in Haiti consisted of one free election, producing a president overthrown nine months later. The United States is once again nominally committed to nation-building, at which it has proved to have no talent whatever.The Clinton administration's ambition is quickly to hand over to international authority and get out. It is unlikely to find a competent authority to which to hand over.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | June 6, 1994
Paris.--President Clinton will not improve his own or his country's standing by giving speeches during this European trip on the old and platitudinous subjects of allied solidarity. Nor is it a good sign that the president thinks his foreign-policy difficulties are to be solved by ''doing a better job of communicating.''It surely is obvious to anyone not part of Mr. Clinton's inner circle that the administration's problem is one of bad policy or lack of policy, not presentation. A series of fiascoes has occurred -- Haiti, Somalia, Bosnia, China, North Korea.
NEWS
By Harrison J. Goldin | September 17, 1990
IN THE PREVAILING Western view, Saddam Hussein is a hero to the downtrodden Arab masses but a loathsome dictator in the eyes of educated, westernized Arabs.This misreading not only severely understates the Iraqi leader's appeal but misleads the West into minimizing the risks of a prolonged confrontation with Saddam.The dominant impression of an American businessman just returned from two weeks in Yemen, Syria, Egypt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia is of an Arab world seething with resentment against the United States, barely able to contain its glee at the prospect of an Arab leader bold enough to defy the greatest power on Earth.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | June 6, 1994
Paris.--President Clinton will not improve his own or his country's standing by giving speeches during this European trip on the old and platitudinous subjects of allied solidarity. Nor is it a good sign that the president thinks his foreign-policy difficulties are to be solved by ''doing a better job of communicating.''It surely is obvious to anyone not part of Mr. Clinton's inner circle that the administration's problem is one of bad policy or lack of policy, not presentation. A series of fiascoes has occurred -- Haiti, Somalia, Bosnia, China, North Korea.
NEWS
By LAWRENCE E. HARRISON | May 15, 1994
'TC Our Haiti policy, which was disfigured by a huge blunder -- the embargo -- shortly after the ouster of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide 2 1/2 years ago, has become a travesty driven by the politics of race. The only way the Clinton administration can salvage U.S. credibility and its own dignity is through an intervention that dismantles Haiti's military and police institutions.The embargo blunder was the consequence of an exaggerated U.S. and Latin American concern for "democracy" that has overwhelmed our other interests in Haiti, above all the well-being of millions of desperately poor Haitians.
NEWS
By A. M. Rosenthal | April 14, 1994
PRESIDENT Clinton, after overriding the publicly stated opinions of his own secretary of defense and top military officer, sent U.S. airplanes into action in Bosnia by the decision of a British general.How often, how hard and how deep will U.S. planes strike again?Americans may find that the answers depend not so much on their elected president and constitutional commander in chief as on the opinions of that British general and his international staff, the wisdom or rage of the Bosnian Serbs, the political and military maneuvering of the Bosnian Muslims, and emotions and internal struggles in Russia.
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