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By JEFF DANZINGER and JEFF DANZINGER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 1996
"Like a Hurricane," by Paul Chaat Smith and Robert Allen Warrior. New Press. 340 pages. $25.The fractious history of the American Indian Movement in this confused book reminded me of the history of anarchism. Anarchism was doomed because it was against organization that made movements possible. AIM and the other Indian protest organizations before and after it were all poorly organized and led so badly they had almost no leadership. Sadly, we now know the suffering, death and destruction of those years could have been avoided by the simple act of opening casinos.
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NEWS
By JEFF DANZINGER and JEFF DANZINGER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 1996
"Like a Hurricane," by Paul Chaat Smith and Robert Allen Warrior. New Press. 340 pages. $25.The fractious history of the American Indian Movement in this confused book reminded me of the history of anarchism. Anarchism was doomed because it was against organization that made movements possible. AIM and the other Indian protest organizations before and after it were all poorly organized and led so badly they had almost no leadership. Sadly, we now know the suffering, death and destruction of those years could have been avoided by the simple act of opening casinos.
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FEATURES
By Michael Hill | December 18, 1990
There is an ugly blot on the image of shining purity projected by the United States. Our story of ourselves as a land of freedom and liberty and democracy and opportunity that respects the rights of all individuals rings far from true when you consider the treatment of the American Indian.We have tried to mythologize that bit of history we don't want to face with the Western movie and cowboy-and-Indian serials. We have tried to trivialize it by making the Native Americans silly symbols of the Washington Redskins and Cleveland Indians and other sports teams.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | December 18, 1990
There is an ugly blot on the image of shining purity projected by the United States. Our story of ourselves as a land of freedom and liberty and democracy and opportunity that respects the rights of all individuals rings far from true when you consider the treatment of the American Indian.We have tried to mythologize that bit of history we don't want to face with the Western movie and cowboy-and-Indian serials. We have tried to trivialize it by making the Native Americans silly symbols of the Washington Redskins and Cleveland Indians and other sports teams.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 20, 1991
MINNEAPOLIS -- The tomahawk chop is not popular in these parts, where Native Americans do not take kindly to the appropriation and misrepresentation of their heritage. The Atlanta Braves and their fans might mean no disrespect, but they were the focus of a protest rally held outside the Metrodome before last night's opening game of the 88th World Series.America's baseball team has become a political football. The mayor of Minneapolis, Don Fraser, has joined Sen. Paul Wellstone, D-Minn., and a coalition of civil rights organizations in denouncing the Braves organization for fostering a demeaning stereotype of Indians.
FEATURES
January 23, 1992
Former Attorney General Ramsey Clark and John Stockwell, a former CIA agent known for his public criticisms of the agency, are among the experts and scholars who will participate in "The Politics of Imagery and Terrorism," a two-day symposium that runs tomorrow and Saturday at the Maryland Institute, College of Art.The event will attempt to create a better understanding of terrorism and its representation in the media.Mr. Clark, attorney general during the Johnson administration, will deliver the keynote address at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the Mount Royal Station Auditorium.
NEWS
July 1, 1993
James E. Riesbeck, 50, a Corning Inc. executive who led the redevelopment of the Watkins Glen International race track, died Monday after undergoing treatment for a heart ailment at Robert Packer Hospital in Sayre, Pa.* Samuel J. "Red" Russotti, 81, the reputed head of Rochester, N.Y.'s organized crime family, died Friday in the Federal Correctional Institution in Milan, Mich. He had been in prison since 1984 and would have been eligible for parole in October 1994.* Cuban pianist Emiliano Salvador, 66, who once played for the Cuban National Ballet and led an orchestra on the island nation, has died of a heart attack in Miami.
NEWS
December 1, 1996
Western Maryland College has welcomed nine full-time and 13 part-time undergraduate faculty members for the 1996-1997 academic year.The new full-time members are:Timothy J. Baylor, assistant professor, sociology. He has researched the Native American culture, including the American Indian Movement (AIM).Lauren Dundes, assistant professor, sociology. Dundes is coordinator of the Integrated Youth Apprenticeship Method, a nonprofit summer enrichment program in East Baltimore.Susan Futeral-Myrowitz, visiting assistant professor, social work.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1994
The nation's top American Indian leaders gathered in Albuquerque, N.M., this week to discuss concerns ranging from religious freedoms to water rights.But Russell Means, the co-founder of the American Indian Movement and a leader of the protest at Wounded Knee, S.D., in 1973, wasn't among them. The activist turned actor was at the Anne Arundel County fairgrounds in Crownsville to be the guest of honor at a festival to raise awareness of children's rights and the environment.Mr. Means has abandoned the leadership of the American Indian Movement for Hollywood.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1998
Students can play the didgeridoo, learn the art of songwriting and build their own Native American flutes at the fourth annual Common Ground on the Hill next week.While dabbling in the arts, they might learn about other cultures.The weeklong celebration of music and the arts opens Sundayat Western Maryland College in Westminster, with courses and performances designed to build bridges between cultures."I'm looking forward to meeting with new people and reuniting with some of the musicians I've performed with in the past," said Peggy Seeger, a songwriter and instrumentalist who has taken part in nearly 100 recordings.
NEWS
October 26, 1991
A few sports-team nicknames actually were chosen to ridicule. In the countercultural '60s, students in various parts of the University of California system adopted Anteaters and Banana Slugs as mascots. The original Dodgers of Brooklyn got their name, abbreviated from "Trolley-Dodgers," as a commentary on city traffic.Mostly, however, teams choose nicknames with positive associations -- superior fighting skills (Lions or Tigers), local history (Towson High School's Generals) or fauna (Orioles, Terrapins and UMBC's Retrievers)
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 24, 1997
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- The word "squaw," long the stuff of TV westerns and American vernacular, is so offensive to many American Indians that a national activist group is launching a campaign to remove it from more than 100 places throughout California, including the most famous of all: Squaw Valley.These activists, leaders of the American Indian Movement, say the word is the white man's pejorative slang for "vagina," and they consider it among "the worst of the worst."The group's crusade has already met with success in Minnesota, where activists persuaded the state Legislature to pass a law decreeing that 19 places containing the word "squaw" be changed.
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