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By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1998
The holidays are stressful for most people, but for Dickie Rose Godwin-Locklear, the season has been more difficult than in past years.Godwin-Locklear's husband, Willie Locklear, 45, has been unable work for six months since he fell off a roof and tore cartilage in his right leg, and she stopped working earlier in the year to care for her mother. With bills to pay, she said, the family doesn't have much left for gifts for her children -- Shena Morgan, 11, and Brian Ransom, 10.This year Godwin-Locklear, who lives in East Baltimore's Highlandtown, turned to the Baltimore American Indian Center for help.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | August 25, 2008
Two by two, they danced into a tent wearing elaborate feather headdresses, leather moccasins and bells tied to their ankles or knees. A circle of drummers played and chanted in the corner. Native Americans from Baltimore and across the country gathered in Patterson Park yesterday for the 34th Annual Powwow put on by the Baltimore American Indian Center. Participants included members of the Haliwa-Saponi tribe from North Carolina, Kiowa from Oklahoma and Lumbee from Baltimore. The three-day event, which ended yesterday, was designed to spotlight Native American culture.
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NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
A caption in yesterday's editions of The Sun misidentified a leader at the Baltimore American Indian Center. His name is Keith Colston.The Sun regrets the errors.Eight months ago, morale at the Baltimore American Indian Center had hit an all-time low. The group's executive director had been fired after a handgun violation arrest. The center had been accused of mismanaging several thousand dollars.Then came Milton Hunt, an energetic entrepreneur whose no-nonsense business attitude and youthful energy have drawn comments -- some in praise, others in skepticism -- at the Fells Point center that serves the 6,000 American Indians in the Baltimore area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
For Native Americans, a dance can be so much more than a dance. "They can be traditional or contemporary," says Keith Colston, a cultural consultant for the Baltimore American Indian Center. Colston also teaches and choreographs dances for the Soaring Eagle Dance Troupe, which is scheduled to perform this weekend at the Baltimore American Indian Association's 25th Anniversary Pow-Wow celebration at the Baltimore Convention Center. "Traditional dances tell stories of hunts and battles of long ago," he says.
NEWS
April 12, 1997
A caption in yesterday's editions of The Sun misidentified a leader at the Baltimore American Indian Center. His name is Keith Colston.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 4/12/97
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 10, 1996
The executive director of the Baltimore American Indian Center was arrested Monday on assault and handgun possession charges in connection with a dispute at a downtown bar.Herbert H. Locklear, 63, was arrested at the center at 113 S. Broadway about 6 p.m. and released that day. A court date has not been set.James A. Jones, 23, filed charges against Locklear July 2, four days after Jones was approached at a North Howard Street bar and threatened with a...
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 11, 1996
A Festival of Nations, including live music and a U.S. citizenship ceremony, will be held from noon to 7 p.m. Sunday in the 200 block of S. Broadway.Billed as an event to bring ethnic groups together, it is sponsored by the Hispanic Business Association, the Southeast Development Initiative, El Coloqio and the American Indian Center.Pub Date: 10/11/96
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | October 12, 1993
Shirley Jeffrey, an East Baltimore resident, remembers the painful moment five years ago when two Sioux Indians told her that "Lumbees aren't really Indians."Jimmy Hunt recalls a similar experience as an Army recruit when a sergeant asked the American Indians in the group to stand up. "There were two others besides myself," he says. "Later they said I wasn't an Indian because I was a Lumbee."Not really Indians? How could this be said of the largest American Indian group east of the Mississippi?
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | November 24, 1991
Barry Richardson leans against a brick wall, staring into the sunlight of an unseasonably warm fall day. At a photographer's request, he points his eye toward the distance and offers a wry smile. It may only be a pose, but the subject sees grander meaning in the simple gesture."That's what I'm doing -- looking into the future," he says and pauses a moment. "And what I see is more budget cuts."That's not all he sees. As the executive director of the Baltimore ++ American Indian Center, much comes under his purview: a $1.5 million budget, roughly 3,000 Baltimore American Indians and a host of societal problems -- from high unemployment to low voter registration.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1999
Privacy at the cramped Centro de la Comunidad office in East Baltimore is a luxury. Battleship-gray filing cabinets serve as room dividers and crude conversation buffers.For three years, the staff at the outreach and social service center has managed to work there, practically whispering during job placement or family counseling sessions. But as Baltimore's Hispanic community has grown to an estimated 40,000, the center, in the 2700 block of Pulaski Highway, has been pressed to expand.With a long sought-after $200,000 state grant awarded at the end of the legislative session, the center will undergo renovations this summer that will almost double its size.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1999
Privacy at the cramped Centro de la Comunidad office in East Baltimore is a luxury. Battleship-gray filing cabinets serve as room dividers and crude conversation buffers.For three years, the staff at the outreach and social service center has managed to work there, practically whispering during job placement or family counseling sessions. But as Baltimore's Hispanic community has grown to an estimated 40,000, the center, in the 2700 block of Pulaski Highway, has been pressed to expand.With a long sought-after $200,000 state grant awarded at the end of the legislative session, the center will undergo renovations this summer that will almost double its size.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1998
The holidays are stressful for most people, but for Dickie Rose Godwin-Locklear, the season has been more difficult than in past years.Godwin-Locklear's husband, Willie Locklear, 45, has been unable work for six months since he fell off a roof and tore cartilage in his right leg, and she stopped working earlier in the year to care for her mother. With bills to pay, she said, the family doesn't have much left for gifts for her children -- Shena Morgan, 11, and Brian Ransom, 10.This year Godwin-Locklear, who lives in East Baltimore's Highlandtown, turned to the Baltimore American Indian Center for help.
NEWS
April 12, 1997
A caption in yesterday's editions of The Sun misidentified a leader at the Baltimore American Indian Center. His name is Keith Colston.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 4/12/97
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
A caption in yesterday's editions of The Sun misidentified a leader at the Baltimore American Indian Center. His name is Keith Colston.The Sun regrets the errors.Eight months ago, morale at the Baltimore American Indian Center had hit an all-time low. The group's executive director had been fired after a handgun violation arrest. The center had been accused of mismanaging several thousand dollars.Then came Milton Hunt, an energetic entrepreneur whose no-nonsense business attitude and youthful energy have drawn comments -- some in praise, others in skepticism -- at the Fells Point center that serves the 6,000 American Indians in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 11, 1996
A Festival of Nations, including live music and a U.S. citizenship ceremony, will be held from noon to 7 p.m. Sunday in the 200 block of S. Broadway.Billed as an event to bring ethnic groups together, it is sponsored by the Hispanic Business Association, the Southeast Development Initiative, El Coloqio and the American Indian Center.Pub Date: 10/11/96
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 10, 1996
The executive director of the Baltimore American Indian Center was arrested Monday on assault and handgun possession charges in connection with a dispute at a downtown bar.Herbert H. Locklear, 63, was arrested at the center at 113 S. Broadway about 6 p.m. and released that day. A court date has not been set.James A. Jones, 23, filed charges against Locklear July 2, four days after Jones was approached at a North Howard Street bar and threatened with a...
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | August 25, 2008
Two by two, they danced into a tent wearing elaborate feather headdresses, leather moccasins and bells tied to their ankles or knees. A circle of drummers played and chanted in the corner. Native Americans from Baltimore and across the country gathered in Patterson Park yesterday for the 34th Annual Powwow put on by the Baltimore American Indian Center. Participants included members of the Haliwa-Saponi tribe from North Carolina, Kiowa from Oklahoma and Lumbee from Baltimore. The three-day event, which ended yesterday, was designed to spotlight Native American culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
For Native Americans, a dance can be so much more than a dance. "They can be traditional or contemporary," says Keith Colston, a cultural consultant for the Baltimore American Indian Center. Colston also teaches and choreographs dances for the Soaring Eagle Dance Troupe, which is scheduled to perform this weekend at the Baltimore American Indian Association's 25th Anniversary Pow-Wow celebration at the Baltimore Convention Center. "Traditional dances tell stories of hunts and battles of long ago," he says.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | October 12, 1993
Shirley Jeffrey, an East Baltimore resident, remembers the painful moment five years ago when two Sioux Indians told her that "Lumbees aren't really Indians."Jimmy Hunt recalls a similar experience as an Army recruit when a sergeant asked the American Indians in the group to stand up. "There were two others besides myself," he says. "Later they said I wasn't an Indian because I was a Lumbee."Not really Indians? How could this be said of the largest American Indian group east of the Mississippi?
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | November 24, 1991
Barry Richardson leans against a brick wall, staring into the sunlight of an unseasonably warm fall day. At a photographer's request, he points his eye toward the distance and offers a wry smile. It may only be a pose, but the subject sees grander meaning in the simple gesture."That's what I'm doing -- looking into the future," he says and pauses a moment. "And what I see is more budget cuts."That's not all he sees. As the executive director of the Baltimore ++ American Indian Center, much comes under his purview: a $1.5 million budget, roughly 3,000 Baltimore American Indians and a host of societal problems -- from high unemployment to low voter registration.
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