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TRAVEL
By June Sawyers and June Sawyers,Chicago Tribune | October 12, 2003
Business travelers have been the backbone of the hotel industry for so long that it became easy to take them for granted, assuming they'd always be there. Not anymore. With occupancy rates dropping from 63 percent in 2000 to 59.1 percent, according to the American Hotel & Lodging Association's 2003 Lodging Industry Profile, hotels have a lot of unanticipated empty beds to fill. Now the business traveler is being wooed, pursued and flattered through incentive and frequent guest programs, discounted corporate rates and various packaging and bundling schemes.
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TRAVEL
By JANE ENGLE and JANE ENGLE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
Here's an urban myth that refuses to die: Hotel card keys are gold mines for identity thieves, who extract credit card numbers and other personal nuggets from them. This rumor, generating millions of Internet postings in recent years, is based on a thin premise at best. Now it's been convincingly debunked by Computerworld, a Framingham, Mass.-based weekly trade tabloid for information technology professionals. The publication challenged a top maker of magnetic card readers to find personal data on 100 room-card keys -- from Hilton, Holiday Inn, Sheraton, Westin and other major chains -- collected by staff members in their travels.
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NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2000
In Columbia, three extended-stay hotels stand on a swath of land that stretches just longer than a half-mile, and soon, a Hampton Inn hotel will join them. Although the competitors are sandwiched together on Route 100, company officials say with the extended-stay business booming, there's enough business to go around. "All of this starts with demand," said Tim Sheldon, senior vice president of extended-stay lodging for Bethesda-based Marriott International Inc., adding that different brands of extended-stay hotels fill different niches, from budget lodgings to upscale accommodations.
TRAVEL
By June Sawyers and June Sawyers,Chicago Tribune | October 12, 2003
Business travelers have been the backbone of the hotel industry for so long that it became easy to take them for granted, assuming they'd always be there. Not anymore. With occupancy rates dropping from 63 percent in 2000 to 59.1 percent, according to the American Hotel & Lodging Association's 2003 Lodging Industry Profile, hotels have a lot of unanticipated empty beds to fill. Now the business traveler is being wooed, pursued and flattered through incentive and frequent guest programs, discounted corporate rates and various packaging and bundling schemes.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1997
NEW YORK -- The NAACP called yesterday for a boycott of three major hotel chains, saying they did not respond to a survey of blacks' role in the lodging industry.NAACP President Kweisi Mfume gave F's on a hotel report card to the Best Western, Holiday Inn and Westin chains. In a preliminary report in February, the NAACP gave eight chains failing grades. Five later responded and improved their standing.Mfume said the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and three dozen black professional and fraternal groups hoped to mount a boycott of the three chains by midsummer in the nation's 25 largest markets, including Baltimore, where the NAACP is based.
TRAVEL
By JANE ENGLE and JANE ENGLE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
Here's an urban myth that refuses to die: Hotel card keys are gold mines for identity thieves, who extract credit card numbers and other personal nuggets from them. This rumor, generating millions of Internet postings in recent years, is based on a thin premise at best. Now it's been convincingly debunked by Computerworld, a Framingham, Mass.-based weekly trade tabloid for information technology professionals. The publication challenged a top maker of magnetic card readers to find personal data on 100 room-card keys -- from Hilton, Holiday Inn, Sheraton, Westin and other major chains -- collected by staff members in their travels.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2001
In the months leading up to last week's opening of the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, managers interviewed thousands of potential employees -- including some who didn't know they were being interviewed. Managers frequented restaurants and shops around town, watched and listened, and then slipped cards to certain workers. "YOU IMPRESSED ME!" read the cards, which had a picture of the hotel on the front and an invitation to apply for a job inside. Marketing Director Mike Waterman said he handed out at least 50. That's just one of the aggressive methods of recruiting workers that hotels have resorted to in recent years as unemployment has hit record lows, and workers have found jobs outside the traditionally low-paying hospitality industry.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1997
WASHINGTON -- NAACP President Kweisi Mfume gave most major hotel chains failing grades yesterday on doing business with black Americans, and he urged consumers to boycott those with bad report cards.Flanked by representatives of black professional and fraternal groups, Mfume released highlights of an NAACP survey of hotel chains' hiring, promotion and procurement, but no detailed results. He said a "consumer guide" to the lodging industry was forthcoming.The survey represents the NAACP's first major foray under Mfume into what he calls the "logical extension of the civil rights movement -- economic empowerment."
FEATURES
By Naedine Joy Hazell and Naedine Joy Hazell,HARTFORD COURANT | October 11, 1998
The industry that has warmly embraced every trend from B&Bs to sleekly similar corporate rooms has put its arms around a new product - the boutique hotel."
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2001
The guy carrying a black duffel bag and walking out a door reserved for employees looked a little suspicious to Julevette Price as she made security rounds at the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel garage. "Sir, can I help you? Do you have a car in the garage," she asked. The man turned and Price immediately recognized the "peanut"-shaped head and dark-circled eyes from a crime photo she'd seen earlier in the week. The man fled into a thick July 4 crowd and Price radioed to other security officers who caught him at the other end of the hotel.
FEATURES
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2002
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - He started out convinced that he would become Russia's Picasso. But it's unlikely you will have heard of Sergei Yushkevich. At 43, his hair is graying and slightly wispy, and the skin around his eyes is delicately etched with the wrinkles left by a million smiles. He knows he is good at what he does. He wields his brushes and oils with dexterity and skill. But doubts swirl in his soul like snowflakes whipped by the winter wind outside his studio window. Is he an artist?
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2001
The guy carrying a black duffel bag and walking out a door reserved for employees looked a little suspicious to Julevette Price as she made security rounds at the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel garage. "Sir, can I help you? Do you have a car in the garage," she asked. The man turned and Price immediately recognized the "peanut"-shaped head and dark-circled eyes from a crime photo she'd seen earlier in the week. The man fled into a thick July 4 crowd and Price radioed to other security officers who caught him at the other end of the hotel.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2001
In the months leading up to last week's opening of the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, managers interviewed thousands of potential employees -- including some who didn't know they were being interviewed. Managers frequented restaurants and shops around town, watched and listened, and then slipped cards to certain workers. "YOU IMPRESSED ME!" read the cards, which had a picture of the hotel on the front and an invitation to apply for a job inside. Marketing Director Mike Waterman said he handed out at least 50. That's just one of the aggressive methods of recruiting workers that hotels have resorted to in recent years as unemployment has hit record lows, and workers have found jobs outside the traditionally low-paying hospitality industry.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2000
In Columbia, three extended-stay hotels stand on a swath of land that stretches just longer than a half-mile, and soon, a Hampton Inn hotel will join them. And while the competitors are sandwiched together beside Route 100, company officials say with the extended-stay business booming, there's enough business to go around. "All of this starts with demand," said Tim Sheldon, senior vice president of extended-stay lodging for Bethesda-based Marriott International Inc., adding that different brands of extended-stay hotels have different niches, from a budget stay to upscale accommodations.
FEATURES
By Naedine Joy Hazell and Naedine Joy Hazell,HARTFORD COURANT | October 11, 1998
The industry that has warmly embraced every trend from B&Bs to sleekly similar corporate rooms has put its arms around a new product - the boutique hotel."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1997
NEW YORK -- The NAACP called yesterday for a boycott of three major hotel chains, saying they did not respond to a survey of blacks' role in the lodging industry.NAACP President Kweisi Mfume gave F's on a hotel report card to the Best Western, Holiday Inn and Westin chains. In a preliminary report in February, the NAACP gave eight chains failing grades. Five later responded and improved their standing.Mfume said the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and three dozen black professional and fraternal groups hoped to mount a boycott of the three chains by midsummer in the nation's 25 largest markets, including Baltimore, where the NAACP is based.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1992
Talentbase Services, a provider of multimedia employment search assistance, moved from Eastport to Clock Tower Place on Forest Drive in Annapolis.R. E. Michel Co., a Baltimore-based distributor of air-conditioning, heating and refrigeration equipment and supplies, opened a branch office in Providence, R.I. Roy Johnson is branch manager.Ecological Restoration and Management Inc. has won a contract from J. D. Eckman Inc. to work on wetlands in Cecil County.KudosStouffer Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore and Choice Hotels International, a Silver Spring-based hotel chain, won Gold Key Public Relations Awards from the American Hotel & Motel Association.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1997
WASHINGTON -- NAACP President Kweisi Mfume gave most major hotel chains failing grades yesterday on doing business with black Americans, and he urged consumers to boycott those with bad report cards.Flanked by representatives of black professional and fraternal groups, Mfume released highlights of an NAACP survey of hotel chains' hiring, promotion and procurement, but no detailed results. He said a "consumer guide" to the lodging industry was forthcoming.The survey represents the NAACP's first major foray under Mfume into what he calls the "logical extension of the civil rights movement -- economic empowerment."
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