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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1999
Dr. Philip Dirlam Bonnet, a retired physician-administrator and former head of the American Hospital Association, died May 12 of a heart ailment at his Roland Park home. He was 87.In a long career, Dr. Bonnet was administrator of University Hospital in Boston from 1948 to 1966 when he moved to Baltimore and joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins University's School of Hygiene and Public Health. He retired as chairman of the school's health care organization department in 1976.He then joined Social Security Administration and retired as the agency's acting chief medical officer for disability in the 1980s.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
The Maryland Hospital Association said Friday that jobs may be in jeopardy if a state commission approves a plan that would make hospitals absorb all of the 2 percent Medicare cuts required under federal sequestration. The board of the Health Services Cost Review Commission, which sets the state's hospital rates, is scheduled to vote Wednesday on how to implement the cuts. The commission's staff has recommended a plan that keeps hospital rates flat for the last three months of fiscal year 2013, which ends June 30. Hospitals are pushing for a rate increase to help offset the cost of the cuts.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Health officials predicted yesterday that hospitals would take more stringent action to ensure that health practitioners infected with the AIDS virus do not perform invasive procedures.Their predictions were prompted by the Senate's overwhelming approval on Thursday of two tough measures intended to prevent health professionals from infecting patients with the AIDS virus.The officials interpreted the Senate votes as expressions of a growing public fear that health practitioners could infect patients, although this is known to have occurred in only five of the 182,000 cases of AIDS reported since the disease was first recognized in 1981.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2012
Johns Hopkins Hospital lost its coveted spot as the nation's top-ranked hospital for the first time in 22 years, edged out by Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital in the latest analysis by U.S. News & World Report to be released Tuesday. Hopkins still ranked No. 2, and marketing experts said falling one spot will hurt the hospital's ego more than its reputation. "They'll survive this, I'm sure," said Roger Gray, founder and partner of GKV, an advertising and marketing firm in Baltimore.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 19, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Congressional leaders, concerned that many nonprofit hospitals are not providing enough charity care to justify their tax-exempt status, say they will set standards for the industry if it does not do so itself. Senate Finance Committee Chairman Charles E. Grassley, an Iowa Republican, is examining nonprofit hospitals with an eye to legislation that would clarify standards for their tax exemptions. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Bill Thomas, a California Republican, began investigating the financial practices of nonprofit hospitals last year.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
The Maryland Hospital Association said Friday that jobs may be in jeopardy if a state commission approves a plan that would make hospitals absorb all of the 2 percent Medicare cuts required under federal sequestration. The board of the Health Services Cost Review Commission, which sets the state's hospital rates, is scheduled to vote Wednesday on how to implement the cuts. The commission's staff has recommended a plan that keeps hospital rates flat for the last three months of fiscal year 2013, which ends June 30. Hospitals are pushing for a rate increase to help offset the cost of the cuts.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Many hospital patients are dissatisfied with some aspects of their care and might not recommend their hospitals to friends and relatives, the federal government said yesterday as it issued ratings for most of the nation's hospitals, based on the first uniform national survey of patients. The survey was meant to provide a constructive way for patients to complain about arrogant doctors, crabby nurses and dirty or noisy hospital rooms. Medical experts said some of the complaints bore directly on the quality of care.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 18, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Life-and-death decisions involving thousands of critically ill people could be profoundly affected next year under a new law requiring that patients be informed of their right to refuse life-prolonging care.Starting next year, all adult patients must be told on admission to a hospital, nursing home or health maintenance organization how to prepare a legally binding living will, which typically directs doctors not to use heroic measures in hopeless cases.As a result, death could come more swiftly for thousands of critically ill people in years to come, according to medical researchers.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | March 30, 1993
Charles F. Morrison, retired director of plant operations at Church Home and Hospital and a national leader in hospital safety and maintenance, died at the hospital Friday of heart failure. He was 76.Known as "Uncle Charlie," Mr. Morrison was a familiar figure in the restaurants and bars of Fells Point, the neighborhood where he lived alone for many years. A dining room at the Waterfront Hotel on Thames Street was named for him 13 years ago because of the number of patrons he took there.At the Red Star, next to his Wolfe Street home, employees remembered Mr. Morrison over the weekend by setting up at his regular place at the bar a T-shirt he had made saying, "Friendship: You Can't Buy It," a drink and a pack of cigarettes.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | January 19, 2007
Two venerable local hospitals, St. Agnes Hospital and St. Joseph Medical Center, will announce today that they will work jointly on clinical and business opportunities, allowing them to expand services in ways neither institution easily could do alone. They're not merging. The two will keep their current names, medical staffs, employees, management and boards. The new "strategic alliance," called Mission Health Partners, will explore joint outpatient centers and programs for underserved neighborhoods and sharing of "back office" functions.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Many hospital patients are dissatisfied with some aspects of their care and might not recommend their hospitals to friends and relatives, the federal government said yesterday as it issued ratings for most of the nation's hospitals, based on the first uniform national survey of patients. The survey was meant to provide a constructive way for patients to complain about arrogant doctors, crabby nurses and dirty or noisy hospital rooms. Medical experts said some of the complaints bore directly on the quality of care.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | January 19, 2007
Two venerable local hospitals, St. Agnes Hospital and St. Joseph Medical Center, will announce today that they will work jointly on clinical and business opportunities, allowing them to expand services in ways neither institution easily could do alone. They're not merging. The two will keep their current names, medical staffs, employees, management and boards. The new "strategic alliance," called Mission Health Partners, will explore joint outpatient centers and programs for underserved neighborhoods and sharing of "back office" functions.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 19, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Congressional leaders, concerned that many nonprofit hospitals are not providing enough charity care to justify their tax-exempt status, say they will set standards for the industry if it does not do so itself. Senate Finance Committee Chairman Charles E. Grassley, an Iowa Republican, is examining nonprofit hospitals with an eye to legislation that would clarify standards for their tax exemptions. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Bill Thomas, a California Republican, began investigating the financial practices of nonprofit hospitals last year.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1999
Dr. Philip Dirlam Bonnet, a retired physician-administrator and former head of the American Hospital Association, died May 12 of a heart ailment at his Roland Park home. He was 87.In a long career, Dr. Bonnet was administrator of University Hospital in Boston from 1948 to 1966 when he moved to Baltimore and joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins University's School of Hygiene and Public Health. He retired as chairman of the school's health care organization department in 1976.He then joined Social Security Administration and retired as the agency's acting chief medical officer for disability in the 1980s.
NEWS
December 2, 1993
Dr. Clement BrownSSA officialDr. Clement R. Brown, associate chief medical director of the Social Security Administration's disability program since 1989, died Sunday after suffering a heart attack while running near his home on Bellona Avenue in the Pinehurst area.Dr. Brown, who was 65, taught and maintained a private practice in internal and family medicine in the Chicago area before he came to the Baltimore area in 1989.He taught at the University of Illinois from 1971 until 1984 and also held a series of posts as director of medical education at hospitals.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | March 30, 1993
Charles F. Morrison, retired director of plant operations at Church Home and Hospital and a national leader in hospital safety and maintenance, died at the hospital Friday of heart failure. He was 76.Known as "Uncle Charlie," Mr. Morrison was a familiar figure in the restaurants and bars of Fells Point, the neighborhood where he lived alone for many years. A dining room at the Waterfront Hotel on Thames Street was named for him 13 years ago because of the number of patrons he took there.At the Red Star, next to his Wolfe Street home, employees remembered Mr. Morrison over the weekend by setting up at his regular place at the bar a T-shirt he had made saying, "Friendship: You Can't Buy It," a drink and a pack of cigarettes.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2012
Johns Hopkins Hospital lost its coveted spot as the nation's top-ranked hospital for the first time in 22 years, edged out by Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital in the latest analysis by U.S. News & World Report to be released Tuesday. Hopkins still ranked No. 2, and marketing experts said falling one spot will hurt the hospital's ego more than its reputation. "They'll survive this, I'm sure," said Roger Gray, founder and partner of GKV, an advertising and marketing firm in Baltimore.
NEWS
December 2, 1993
Dr. Clement BrownSSA officialDr. Clement R. Brown, associate chief medical director of the Social Security Administration's disability program since 1989, died Sunday after suffering a heart attack while running near his home on Bellona Avenue in the Pinehurst area.Dr. Brown, who was 65, taught and maintained a private practice in internal and family medicine in the Chicago area before he came to the Baltimore area in 1989.He taught at the University of Illinois from 1971 until 1984 and also held a series of posts as director of medical education at hospitals.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Health officials predicted yesterday that hospitals would take more stringent action to ensure that health practitioners infected with the AIDS virus do not perform invasive procedures.Their predictions were prompted by the Senate's overwhelming approval on Thursday of two tough measures intended to prevent health professionals from infecting patients with the AIDS virus.The officials interpreted the Senate votes as expressions of a growing public fear that health practitioners could infect patients, although this is known to have occurred in only five of the 182,000 cases of AIDS reported since the disease was first recognized in 1981.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 18, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Life-and-death decisions involving thousands of critically ill people could be profoundly affected next year under a new law requiring that patients be informed of their right to refuse life-prolonging care.Starting next year, all adult patients must be told on admission to a hospital, nursing home or health maintenance organization how to prepare a legally binding living will, which typically directs doctors not to use heroic measures in hopeless cases.As a result, death could come more swiftly for thousands of critically ill people in years to come, according to medical researchers.
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