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April 29, 2013
David Jahnke is the winner of the Maryland Daughters of American Revolution Outstanding Teacher of American History for 2013. He was nominated by the Governor William Paca DAR Chapter of Harford County. On March 23 at Hunt Valley Inn, Jahnke was presented with a $750 check for his outstanding achievements. He will compete in the national DAR contest in June. Jahnke is teaching U.S. History at Harford Technical High School. He began his teaching career in February 2001 by teaching U.S. Government, U.S. History and finally Advanced Placement U.S. History.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 28, 2014
This is a tale of two countries. The first country was built on a radical new promise of human equality and a guarantee of the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That country made it possible for even those born in the humblest and most meager circumstances to climb to the pinnacle of prosperity and achievement. It helped save the world in a great global conflagration, fed and rebuilt the devastated nations of Europe, planted the first footprints on another world.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | November 20, 1998
The opening of "American History X," which was reviewed in last Friday's Sun, was delayed until today. The full review is still available on the Web at http: // citysearch.sunspot.net/E/M/ BALMD/0000/01/82/cs1.html. Here is a summary:"American History X" has been dogged by so much controversy recently that filmgoers may wonder whether they should wear flak jackets and safety goggles.Well, doff those goggles and unzip the protective outerwear: The good news and the bad news is that "American History X" is nothing to be afraid of. Star Edward Norton plays skinhead teen-ager Derek Vinyard, whose most menacing attribute isn't his imposing physicality, it's his mind.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Old photographs, newspapers and other miscellaneous "gay pride ephemera" from the last half-century of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender history in Baltimore will be added on Tuesday to one of the nation's most esteemed museum collections. Officials at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History will accept the archival materials from the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore (GLCCB), and add them to its growing collection of items documenting LGBT history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight | September 19, 2002
With their fresh faces and soft cloth bodies, American Girl dolls have been a phenomenon since they were created in 1985. In addition to a unique look, each doll comes with its own story that teaches kids about American history. As every American Girl fan knows, there also is a series of books to complement the line of dolls. These books tell chatty, upbeat stories centered on life lessons and historical events. One title, Samantha's Ocean Liner Adventure, details a young girl's trip on a steamer ship in 1906.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE ROBINSON | March 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- With the close of Black History Month, African-Americans once again joke about being assigned the shortest month of the year to celebrate our history: "It figures that they give us February." As with most jokes, this one is underscored by truth. Many African-Americans question the scope of America's commitment to a fully inclusive democracy. Choosing February to celebrate Black History Month, then, is consistent with a perceived national inclination to reserve the fewest days possible to address the history, culture, strivings and aspirations of people of African descent.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2003
The sharecropper of a bygone American era probably had little to be cheerful about, considering the cruel cycle of debt, the brutal poverty and backbreaking labor. Still, this particular "sharecropper" on this particular Thursday afternoon finds a way to be downright perky as he greets visitors to PassPort: Voyages of Discovery, but then the new Inner Harbor attraction is an upbeat kind of place. "I'm a sharecropper," says G. Scott Spence, offering a hearty handshake. Wearing blue overalls and straw hat and emitting the sort of vibes one seeks in motivational speakers, Spence ushers folks into "TimeElevator America," a combination cinematic history primer and amusement park ride now open for previews.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | November 13, 1998
The distributor of the film "American History X," reviewed in yesterday's Today section, has delayed the Baltimore opening of the movie until Friday.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 11/14/98American History X" has been dogged by so much controversy recently that filmgoers may wonder whether they should wear flak jackets and safety goggles to the theater. When New Line Cinema and star Edward Norton began editing the movie themselves, its director, Tony Kaye, asked that his name be removed (at one point suggesting the pseudonym "Humpty Dumpty")
FEATURES
By Dawn Fallik and Dawn Fallik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Have you been to the Museum of American History?Not sure? It's the one with the pendulum swinging in the middle of it. Oh, yeah, now you remember. But hold on to that memory, because the pendulum's swing may soon be a part of history -- French history, not American.Like the endless swing of the piece that is at the center of this debate, Smithsonian scholars have swung back and forth over the need for this French bit of science."It's not American and it's not historical," said Steve Lubar, chairman of the division of the history of technology at the MAH. He said the argument over whether to get rid of the pendulum has been going on for about a decade but is now coming to a close.
NEWS
September 17, 2012
One hundred fifty years ago today, two great armies clashed in a titanic struggle that would decide the fate of a nation. "Around a cornfield and a little white Dunker church, around a stone bridge and in a pasture lane worn by cow paths, surged a human tornado," wrote Carl Sandburg many years later. Never before or since has such a deadly concentration of firepower been unleashed on the American continent. The Battle of Antietam, waged across a meandering stream called Antietam Creek in Western Maryland near Hagerstown, was the first great turning point of the American Civil War and the bloodiest single day of combat ever waged on U.S. soil.
NEWS
By Michael Justin Lee | August 14, 2014
Although the summer season still has a few weeks left, the box office take thus far suggests that Hollywood's string of consecutive records likely ended last summer. While consumer tastes are notoriously fickle in the entertainment industry, I do give credit to Hollywood for trying to give consumers more of what they have wanted in the past. So, this season, we welcomed back old friends in new displays of derring-do as they saved humanity from various foes. There was Captain America appearing with the Winter Soldier, Falcon and the Black Widow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lily Hua and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
As the head bartender and mixologist at B&O American Brasserie, Brendan Dorr, 34, has concocted drinks for every type of occasion for his restaurant's guests. But in September, Dorr will have the chance that only 14 mixologists from around the country have: showcasing a concoction at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. The National Museum of American History and Smithsonian Channel are toasting to the 200 th anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner with an event called Raise a Glass to History.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
Seventy years ago, thousands of America's young and courageous men were landing on the shores of Normandy, France. The names of "Omaha," "Utah" and other beaches became emblazoned in American history. On that June 6 morning, my first memory of history came alive as my parents and I heard the radio voice of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. "Our sons, pride of our nation, today have landed on the shores of France," President Roosevelt announced. "Some may return, some may never return.
NEWS
By Johnny Slaughter | February 26, 2014
For years, a group of black men has gathered daily at a cigar shop across from Cross Street Market, here in Baltimore. We talk politics and sports amid plumes of pipe and cigar smoke. However, conversation halts at 7 p.m. when the quiz show "Jeopardy" begins. The wide-screen display, mounted high on an exposed brick wall, shutters conversation when the words: "This. Is. Jeopardy!" bellow from the speakers. An eclectic group of business owners, active/retired police officers, firefighters, salesmen and educators congregate and shout "questions" to the proffered answers.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | January 8, 2014
One of the worst epithets that can be leveled at a politician these days is to call him a "redistributionist. " Yet 2013 marked one of the biggest redistributions in recent American history -- a redistribution upward, from average working people to the owners of America. The stock market ended 2013 at an all-time high -- giving stockholders their biggest annual gain in almost two decades. Most Americans didn't share in those gains, however, because most people haven't been able to save enough to invest in the stock market.
NEWS
By J.B. Salganik | October 15, 2013
While it saddened me to read recently of the attendance troubles at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, I was not surprised. In a city where museums generally exceed expectations, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum has always left something to be desired. As a high school history teacher in Baltimore City public schools, I have never wanted to take my students there because I know intuitively they would hate it. While I understand the impulse to showcase African Americans' social and economic high achievers, this positivist approach obscures the scope of what black Americans have overcome in the past and the challenges they still face today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,Sun Staff | April 4, 2004
CUMBERLAND -- When the women from the Baltimore museum arrive, Miss Romaine Denson Franklin smells like a flower and looks as pretty as a porcelain doll. She's even more promising in person than any artifacts or antiques yet assembled for the new African-American collection. The museum's registrar and exhibits manager help her into the car and drive her to dinner at the Rocky Gap Lodge. The next morning, they will pick her up for church. It's hugs every time they meet, kisses every time they say good-bye.
FEATURES
By Harry Shattuck and Harry Shattuck,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | June 14, 1998
As one progresses north at 50 mph - careful, not a smidgen faster - along the immaculately maintained Natchez Trace Parkway, beside densely wooded forests in southern Mississippi and over the rolling hills of Alabama and Tennessee, the primary sensation is serenity.Could there possibly be a more soothing travel experience? And is there any wonder that this 434.2-mile, two-lane connection between Natchez, Miss., and Nashville, Tenn. - introducing an ever-changing panorama of scenic, recreational and cultural treasures - was selected as one of the first six All-American roadways by the Department of Transportation?
NEWS
October 9, 2013
Baltimore sage H.L. Mencken provided several observations that are relevant to the current political situation. For example, he wrote that "people constantly speak of 'the government' doing this or that, as they might speak of God doing it. But the government is really nothing but a group of men, and usually they are very inferior men. " On the fact that the fractious incompetents in Congress were all duly elected and that the country has thus...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Milton Kent, For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
On its face, "History come to life" isn't the most memorable of corporate sayings, like "Good to the last drop" or "It keeps going and going …" Yet it would be hard to argue that Thomas Saunders and his company, Renaissance Productions & Tours, don't deliver on the promise. For 20 years, Saunders, who has done a little of everything from operating a disco to quashing rumors for Baltimore City government, has been leading groups on tours around the area to sites that have significance in African-American history.
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