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NEWS
November 5, 1995
Kimberly Park hired by U.S. Naval InstituteKimberly Park of Annapolis was recently hired by the membership department of the U.S. Naval Institute as the public relations and promotions assistant.Ms. Park, formerly a membership services representative for the National Business Forms Association in Alexandria, Va., is a 1994 graduate of West Virginia University.Jerry Brice, Anne Drissel named top producersJerry Brice and Anne Drissel were named top producers/units for the Annapolis Office of Weichert, Realtors for the month of August.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | October 7, 2012
Not so long ago, many believed the advent of social media would contribute to more substantive discourse in modern campaigns. But no such luck in our hotly contested presidential race. Sideshows have ruled the day. From caged dogs on car roofs to birth certificates to out-of-context alleged gaffes, it's been "gotcha politics" played out in real time. If it seems the daily one-hit wonder stories enjoy a longer than normal shelf life, they do. Well-financed super PACs are at least partly to blame.
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NEWS
March 28, 2012
Columnist Robert Ehrlich asks why the Affordable Health Care Act is so long ("Obamacare: The 2,300 page monstrosity," March 25). The answer is that in a simpler time it was possible to write a law in simpler form because everyone knew what you meant, and you did not have to defend against every kook whose only goal in life was to look for any possible mistake or alternate meaning of a word or phrase. Anyone who takes the trouble to look into the American health care system realizes the U.S. is sadly lacking in caring for it's citizens.
NEWS
By Benjamin R. Barber | September 25, 2012
The outcome of November's presidential election will affect the entire world. Yet until the attack on our consulate in Libya, issues of foreign policy and globalization were nearly absent from the political discourse. There was talk at both parties' political conventions about American exceptionalism and the nation's exalted place in the world, but little was said about the need for common action with other nations to secure our imperiled common planet. Even former President Bill Clinton stuck to the domestic agenda at his party's Charlotte, N.C., convention.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1998
New positionsMcConnell appointed chief financial officer of KCI TechnologiesKCI Technologies appointed Donald A. McConnell as chief financial officer of the Hunt Valley engineering firm.Formerly a vice president and director of finance with Baltimore-based RTKL Associates, the Timonium resident is a graduate of Pennsylvania State University and a certified public accountant.He is active with the American Heart Association and the Baltimore Area Penn State Campaign.McCormick promotes Abbott to vice presidentMcCormick & Co. promoted Susan L. Abbott to vice president for regulatory and environmental affairs at the international spice and flavorings manufacturer, which has its headquarters in Sparks.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- After 18 years as a family physician in Indianapolis, Dr. Bernard Emkes was sick of the paperwork, the insurance company hassles and the government red-tape imposed upon the modern practice of medicine."
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | October 15, 1991
Salt Lake City. - Former Colorado Gov. Richard Lamm says he hasn't been invited to address any meetings of the American Association of Retired Persons. No wonder. Mr. Lamm once said of the elderly that they have ''a duty to die and get out of the way'' and not tie up medical resources that could be used to benefit those with longer lives to live.Mr. Lamm, who is director of the Center for Public Policy and Contemporary Issues at the University of Denver, brought his message advocating radical reforms in the American health care system to a meeting of editorial writers at the University of Utah Medical Center.
NEWS
September 23, 1993
Excerpts from President Clinton's address on health care to a joint session of Congress, as recorded by the Associated Press:Tonight I want to talk to you about the most critical thing we can do to build that security. This health care system of ours is badly broken, and it is time to fix it.Despite the dedication of literally millions of talented health care professionals, our health care is too uncertain and too expensive, too bureaucratic and too wasteful.It has too much fraud and too much greed.
NEWS
By Daniel Munoz and Alexander A. Khalessi | January 17, 2003
FOREIGN POLICY has dominated much of the national debate recently, but the security of the American people rests equally on our government's attention to domestic concerns. Our country faces a future in which a generation of Americans will contend with illness compounded by inadequate access to necessary health care. For an aging population confronted with the specter of disease, prescription drug coverage through Medicare could offer a timely helping hand. Modern medicine often relies on heroic, resource-intensive measures in life-threatening situations.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | April 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Americans have a growing fear of rising health costs and decreasing medical benefits, a nationwide survey to be released tomorrow shows."
NEWS
March 28, 2012
Columnist Robert Ehrlich asks why the Affordable Health Care Act is so long ("Obamacare: The 2,300 page monstrosity," March 25). The answer is that in a simpler time it was possible to write a law in simpler form because everyone knew what you meant, and you did not have to defend against every kook whose only goal in life was to look for any possible mistake or alternate meaning of a word or phrase. Anyone who takes the trouble to look into the American health care system realizes the U.S. is sadly lacking in caring for it's citizens.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | August 11, 2009
If you're wondering what the ugly, pinched face of America looks like, just turn on the television, open a newspaper or fire up your laptop. Public mayhem, scare-mongering, and even a warning from the 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee about a fictitious "death panel" are, apparently, what constitutes thoughtful discourse about health care coming from the darker corners of American conservatism. And naturally, any serious national conversation on a major policy issue must begin with a thorough discussion ... of the president's birth certificate.
NEWS
By C. William Jones | January 6, 2009
As the U.S. economy continues its meltdown, it is unthinkable that the retirees who fought wars and built our nation through decades of labor, earning post-employment pensions and medical benefits, are among those being faulted for America's economic problems. Lately, economists, talk-show hosts, journalists and even politicians have been echoing the corporate-speak by tagging baby boomers and retirees' earned pensions and health benefits as "legacy costs" dragging our nation down. The Miriam-Webster dictionary defines legacy as a "gift by will, especially of money or other personal property; bequest; something transmitted or received from an ancestor or predecessor."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | September 6, 2007
David Murdock is annoyed. The mayor of Westlake Village, Calif., site of Murdock's new 270-room Four Seasons hotel and health spa, and headquarters of his $6 billion Dole Food Co., has just finished speaking for almost two hours. Murdock, proprietor of one of the nation's biggest private corporate empires and one of the early investors in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, is impatient to get back to business. At 84, he usually doesn't allow anyone to waste his time. "Two hours, can you believe it," he says, shaking his head in disbelief.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | June 29, 2007
WASHINGTON -- America's got a terrific health care system, as long as you don't get sick. That much, at least, seems to be conceded even by lobbyists for the nation's health insurance industry. That's judging by one of the few who showed up at Michael Moore's invitation for the Washington premiere of his new movie, Sicko. "Look, identifying problems in our health care system is like shooting fish in a barrel," consultant Claudia Schlosberg was quoted as saying by The Washington Post. The real issue, she said, is finding solutions.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | June 23, 2006
Americans who push their salt shakers away at home, only to be swamped by salt in take-out and restaurant fare, may get some help cutting back on the condiment. That's important, because we need salt to live - but in high doses, salt can worsen high blood pressure and increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. The American Medical Association has adopted four recommendations seeking federal regulation of the salt in processed foods and restaurant meals. The doctors group is also calling for new public education efforts and a new label - a bright red salt shaker - to warn consumers when food portions are high in salt.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1996
Integrated Health Services of Owings Mills announced yesterday revenues of $1.2 billion for the year -- an increase of 65 percent over 1994 -- and an agreement to buy First American Health Care of Brunswick, Ga., positioning the company for a greater emphasis on home health care.Despite the jump in revenues, Integrated reported a loss, after accounting changes, of $27 million, or $1.26 a share. Before accounting changes and other extraordinary charges, earningswere $2.15 a share, compared with $1.72 in 1994.
NEWS
May 9, 1991
Medical Students Value Serving OthersEditor: Of all your regular contributors to the Opinion * Commentary page, I believe Daniel S. Greenberg has the easiest job. While columnists Ellen Goodman, George F. Will and Carl Rowan may take predictable stances, at least they vary the topics of their columns.Mr. Greenberg's columns haven't changed appreciably in the five years I've read them. Every one bemoans the current state of the American health care system, without offering a single possible solution to what all agree is a treacherous quagmire.
NEWS
By HOLLY SHIVER and HOLLY SHIVER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2006
Hours after their son's death June 21, 1995, the parents of 25-year-old Randolph Scott Jr. made the daunting decision to donate their son's organs. The choice, a rarity in the African-American community, was prompted by their son's forethought to become a donor. "Scottie," as they called him, had registered to become a potential donor by indicating it on his driver's license. "Not only did we know that it was what he wanted, but since we did we agreed very quickly that it was the right thing to do to save someone else's life," says Robin Williams, Scott's mother.
NEWS
By KIM HART and KIM HART,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 2005
Getting sick is risky business for American Indians living in Maryland. At least, that's the way it seems to Theodore Lindamood, a Cherokee living in Somerset County, which the descendants of half a dozen tribes still call home. He sees no signs of the prosperous American Indian communities that once dotted Maryland's rural landscape. Instead, he sees people who are too poor, sick or uninformed to find the health care they need. "If you're native, doctors don't know you exist," said Lindamood, 49. "When you go to a clinic, it's like they don't even see you. You're invisible."
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