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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- For two days, men, women and childre have been writing refrigerator notes to Bill Clinton. They've been penning bits of American graffiti on 6-inch-square construction paper and sticking them on the American Town Hall Wall, another brainchild of the image magicians who brought you the American Reunion on the Mall.They've written reminders, admonitions, scolds, quips, jests, sincere send-offs and even a plea for the pardon of Pee-wee Herman. They're Dear Bill-o-grams, and their authors have taken to this invitation with such enthusiasm you'd think the president-elect had promised to read every last one of them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 12, 2010
The Charles Theatre revival series this week offers its loyal but frigid audiences the closest they can come right now to Grade A cinematic comfort food: George Lucas' "American Graffiti." George Lucas' memories of growing up with carhops, cruising, hot rods and hoods produced a film 37 years ago that sent the whole country into an early-1960s flashback. Its in-and-out, vignette style, and its nonstop rock-oldies soundtrack, quickly became standard issue for teen movies. Some of Lucas's characters - the nerd (Charlie Martin Smith)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 22, 1993
There's an old Chinese curse that says: "May you live in the '70s."Well, maybe there's not, but there should be. So now we have a movie that takes us back to . . . disco . . . platform shoes . . . marijuana . . . Watergate. One question it never answers: Why?Another question it never answers: Who cares?"Dazed and Confused" is being called the "American Graffiti" of the '70s, primarily by the people who have money invested in it. And it has superficial similarities: It's one of those magic-night numbers, where a disparate mob of teen-agers, liberated from ++ their last day of school, wanders through an eventide that seems last a million years, meeting, combining and recombining, having adventures, getting high or getting drunk or getting high and getting drunk, falling in love, falling out of love . . . you get the picture.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | May 23, 2008
In Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, Harrison Ford reinvents the hard-guy archaeologist who carries lots of dents and a bottomless haversack of tricks. He convinces you that between 1989's Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (set in 1938) and The Crystal Skull (set in 1957), Jones has never stopped making things up as he goes along. A knack for exploiting twists of fate is crucial to Indy's makeup - and to the success of the entire series. At its best, it's been an inspired partnership between director Steven Spielberg and this sometimes gnarly, sometimes daffy star.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 26, 1994
Last season, Fox presented a telemovie pilot for a proposed series called "M.A.N.T.I.S.," starring Carl Lumbly as a paraplegic who invents and wears an exoskeleton suit that enables him to walk and gives him super-strength. The series based on that premise premieres tonight -- with a new supporting cast. It's worth watching on its own merits, and also because there's nothing else new and interesting on broadcast TV tonight.* "M.A.N.T.I.S." (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- One change in this series that not everyone may welcome is its reduction in the number of African-American cast members.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | December 2, 2005
Autobiographical movies are the most personal of "personal movies," and big U.S. studios rarely champion personal movies of any kind. Noah Baumbach based his corrosive yet empathic new indie, The Squid and the Whale (opening today at The Charles), on his parents' marital breakup when he was a teenager. It's a welcome addition to the small body of American features that put their creators' lives onscreen with unprecedented directness and intensity. Executives look askance at autobiographical movies partly out of fear that they'll be narrow and self-absorbed.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 24, 1993
To the men and women who lived through the First World War, the summer of 1914 is remembered as the most temperate, the loveliest, the fairest in history. Never were the winds more zephyr-like, never the flowers so gay, never the sky so blue, the grass so green.The only problem is that it wasn't so. Author Paul Fussell, uncovering the theme of the great summer in his examination of World War I memoirs, went back to the newspapers of the period and tracked the weather reports. He discovered the May, June and July that preceded the guns of August were not remarkable in any way.Clearly, a generation had invested its emotional poignancy in a fable, but a necessary one. The horrors that came after made the banality that came before seem ineffably pristine, an exemplar of vanished innocence, a paradise lost.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | May 23, 2008
In Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, Harrison Ford reinvents the hard-guy archaeologist who carries lots of dents and a bottomless haversack of tricks. He convinces you that between 1989's Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (set in 1938) and The Crystal Skull (set in 1957), Jones has never stopped making things up as he goes along. A knack for exploiting twists of fate is crucial to Indy's makeup - and to the success of the entire series. At its best, it's been an inspired partnership between director Steven Spielberg and this sometimes gnarly, sometimes daffy star.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun reporter | December 11, 2006
Cadillacs and DeSotos own the streets again. Men dress for success in tapeworm-thin ties. Suddenly, smoking is socially acceptable and transistor radios the epitome of cutting-edge technology. For a month, yesterday came back from the dead in Baltimore. The cast and crew of Boy of Pigs - an independent feature that completed filming over the weekend - re-created the recent past right down to the detail of forbidding actors to sport any hint of a sideburn. Boy of Pigs is set during the waning days of John F. Kennedy's glam presidency.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 12, 2010
The Charles Theatre revival series this week offers its loyal but frigid audiences the closest they can come right now to Grade A cinematic comfort food: George Lucas' "American Graffiti." George Lucas' memories of growing up with carhops, cruising, hot rods and hoods produced a film 37 years ago that sent the whole country into an early-1960s flashback. Its in-and-out, vignette style, and its nonstop rock-oldies soundtrack, quickly became standard issue for teen movies. Some of Lucas's characters - the nerd (Charlie Martin Smith)
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun reporter | December 11, 2006
Cadillacs and DeSotos own the streets again. Men dress for success in tapeworm-thin ties. Suddenly, smoking is socially acceptable and transistor radios the epitome of cutting-edge technology. For a month, yesterday came back from the dead in Baltimore. The cast and crew of Boy of Pigs - an independent feature that completed filming over the weekend - re-created the recent past right down to the detail of forbidding actors to sport any hint of a sideburn. Boy of Pigs is set during the waning days of John F. Kennedy's glam presidency.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | December 2, 2005
Autobiographical movies are the most personal of "personal movies," and big U.S. studios rarely champion personal movies of any kind. Noah Baumbach based his corrosive yet empathic new indie, The Squid and the Whale (opening today at The Charles), on his parents' marital breakup when he was a teenager. It's a welcome addition to the small body of American features that put their creators' lives onscreen with unprecedented directness and intensity. Executives look askance at autobiographical movies partly out of fear that they'll be narrow and self-absorbed.
NEWS
By FRANK LYNCH | November 15, 2000
WHENEVER I FIND myself feeling nostalgic, I alter my commute to work. Instead of using U.S. 1 to drive the 25 miles from Bel Air to Baltimore, I take the more scenic approach down Harford Road. Once within the city limits, it's just a short hop to the site once occupied by the Hot Shoppe Restaurant. There, my head immediately shifts into rewind. Memories spin out of control: hoop skirts, bobby sox, saddle shoes, white bucks, penny loafers, crew cuts, pony tails, khaki pants with a buckle in the back, V-neck sweaters, corduroy jackets in school colors, souped-up jalopies with glass-packed mufflers, hamburgers, french fries, milkshakes and onion rings.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2000
George Figgs, operator of Fells Point's late Orpheum Theater, is taking his act on the road. Tomorrow, Figgs will debut his Mobile Movie Unit - the projector, popcorn machine and other components of the old Orpheum - in Salisbury. There on Maryland's Eastern Shore, he'll re-create one of the most enjoyable movie-going experiences of yore: the drive-in. At 9 p.m., behind the Ethan Allen furniture store on Main Street, Figgs will show "American Graffiti," a film chosen to coincide with a daylong car show also scheduled for tomorrow in Salisbury.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 26, 1994
Last season, Fox presented a telemovie pilot for a proposed series called "M.A.N.T.I.S.," starring Carl Lumbly as a paraplegic who invents and wears an exoskeleton suit that enables him to walk and gives him super-strength. The series based on that premise premieres tonight -- with a new supporting cast. It's worth watching on its own merits, and also because there's nothing else new and interesting on broadcast TV tonight.* "M.A.N.T.I.S." (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- One change in this series that not everyone may welcome is its reduction in the number of African-American cast members.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 22, 1993
There's an old Chinese curse that says: "May you live in the '70s."Well, maybe there's not, but there should be. So now we have a movie that takes us back to . . . disco . . . platform shoes . . . marijuana . . . Watergate. One question it never answers: Why?Another question it never answers: Who cares?"Dazed and Confused" is being called the "American Graffiti" of the '70s, primarily by the people who have money invested in it. And it has superficial similarities: It's one of those magic-night numbers, where a disparate mob of teen-agers, liberated from ++ their last day of school, wanders through an eventide that seems last a million years, meeting, combining and recombining, having adventures, getting high or getting drunk or getting high and getting drunk, falling in love, falling out of love . . . you get the picture.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2000
George Figgs, operator of Fells Point's late Orpheum Theater, is taking his act on the road. Tomorrow, Figgs will debut his Mobile Movie Unit - the projector, popcorn machine and other components of the old Orpheum - in Salisbury. There on Maryland's Eastern Shore, he'll re-create one of the most enjoyable movie-going experiences of yore: the drive-in. At 9 p.m., behind the Ethan Allen furniture store on Main Street, Figgs will show "American Graffiti," a film chosen to coincide with a daylong car show also scheduled for tomorrow in Salisbury.
NEWS
By FRANK LYNCH | November 15, 2000
WHENEVER I FIND myself feeling nostalgic, I alter my commute to work. Instead of using U.S. 1 to drive the 25 miles from Bel Air to Baltimore, I take the more scenic approach down Harford Road. Once within the city limits, it's just a short hop to the site once occupied by the Hot Shoppe Restaurant. There, my head immediately shifts into rewind. Memories spin out of control: hoop skirts, bobby sox, saddle shoes, white bucks, penny loafers, crew cuts, pony tails, khaki pants with a buckle in the back, V-neck sweaters, corduroy jackets in school colors, souped-up jalopies with glass-packed mufflers, hamburgers, french fries, milkshakes and onion rings.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 24, 1993
To the men and women who lived through the First World War, the summer of 1914 is remembered as the most temperate, the loveliest, the fairest in history. Never were the winds more zephyr-like, never the flowers so gay, never the sky so blue, the grass so green.The only problem is that it wasn't so. Author Paul Fussell, uncovering the theme of the great summer in his examination of World War I memoirs, went back to the newspapers of the period and tracked the weather reports. He discovered the May, June and July that preceded the guns of August were not remarkable in any way.Clearly, a generation had invested its emotional poignancy in a fable, but a necessary one. The horrors that came after made the banality that came before seem ineffably pristine, an exemplar of vanished innocence, a paradise lost.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- For two days, men, women and childre have been writing refrigerator notes to Bill Clinton. They've been penning bits of American graffiti on 6-inch-square construction paper and sticking them on the American Town Hall Wall, another brainchild of the image magicians who brought you the American Reunion on the Mall.They've written reminders, admonitions, scolds, quips, jests, sincere send-offs and even a plea for the pardon of Pee-wee Herman. They're Dear Bill-o-grams, and their authors have taken to this invitation with such enthusiasm you'd think the president-elect had promised to read every last one of them.
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