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By LAWRENCE M. O'ROURKE | December 26, 1994
Washington. -- Given the tendency of the American press and public to focus on personalities of politicians, it is not surprising that House Speaker-to-be Newt Gingrich of Georgia has emerged as hero of the Republican takeover of Congress.Mr. Gingrich is a rags-to-riches story. Just a few years ago, he was a Republican back-bencher distinguished by disdain for his party's leadership. He was a fountain of untested ideas and flamboyant criticism. Now he sits as third man from the presidency, pursued by book publishers with big checkbooks, about to impose his hard-edged theories on the nation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 21, 2013
Comparing the House and Senate federal budget proposals should make the decision a no-brainer. Do we want a $7 billion surplus per the Republican budget or a $566 billion deficit per the Democratic budget? This would be simple except that the American government is literally controlled by the "no brain" administration of President Barack Obama, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. Peggy Alley, Baltimore
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NEWS
March 21, 2013
Comparing the House and Senate federal budget proposals should make the decision a no-brainer. Do we want a $7 billion surplus per the Republican budget or a $566 billion deficit per the Democratic budget? This would be simple except that the American government is literally controlled by the "no brain" administration of President Barack Obama, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. Peggy Alley, Baltimore
NEWS
December 3, 2012
Public sympathy for Pfc. Bradley Manning is misplaced ("Manning: 'I thought I was going to die,'" Nov. 30). He may well be a misfit, but he is a soldier who volunteered for the job. As a member of the armed forces, he must do as he is told. He had no authority to release classified information to the public. He stands to be convicted of sedition, mutiny, dereliction of duty and other crimes. As a civilian, you can "blow the whistle" and not expect to go to prison for it. But you cannot do that as an member of the armed services of any country in the world.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
An American government exam taken by all high school students in Maryland would be eliminated next year under the proposed state budget, a surprising shift in policy that comes just three years after the test was made a graduation requirement. Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal cuts $1.9 million from the Maryland State Department of Education budget that would pay for the test and its grading. However, the legislature could still restore the test if it found the funding. Some educators expressed immediate concern that social studies would get less attention in high schools if the test is eliminated.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
Public sympathy for Pfc. Bradley Manning is misplaced ("Manning: 'I thought I was going to die,'" Nov. 30). He may well be a misfit, but he is a soldier who volunteered for the job. As a member of the armed forces, he must do as he is told. He had no authority to release classified information to the public. He stands to be convicted of sedition, mutiny, dereliction of duty and other crimes. As a civilian, you can "blow the whistle" and not expect to go to prison for it. But you cannot do that as an member of the armed services of any country in the world.
NEWS
By LINDA R. MONK | December 15, 1994
Alexandria, Virginia.--Happy Birthday to the Bill of Rights -- NOT! Today the Bill of Rights is 203 years old, but to many Americans it has become a growing irrelevancy.The speaker-elect of the House of Representatives plans hearings in all 50 states on a constitutional amendment to restore official prayer in the public schools, and the president of the United States is all ears. Never mind that it would be the first time the Bill of Rights has ever been amended. So what if it would abolish separation of church and state, a principle that America invented and that religious people struggled for centuries to establish?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 1996
CAIRO, Egypt -- The most powerful group of Muslim militants here has vowed to strike back at U.S. targets in revenge for the life sentence that was handed down against Sheik Omar Abdel Rahman in New York last week."
NEWS
By TRB | May 18, 1993
Washington. -- If Bill Clinton wants to avoid failure, he desperately needs to focus his presidency on one or two major issues. How do I know this? Because in the last three weeks, according to the Nexis data base, there have been 201 separate stories in the Washington Post and New York Times containing the words ''Clinton'' and ''focus.''The next word to appear in 201 stories about President Clinton will probably be ''comeback.'' But I want to suggest another, more pessimistic angle: President Clinton is failing, he'll keep failing, and it's not his fault.
NEWS
September 12, 2012
The attack on the American consulate in Libya that left four dead, including our ambassador to that country, Chris Stevens, is outrageous and deplorable. The senseless loss of life there should be a cause of mourning for Americans, not a flash point in the presidential election. That said, Mitt Romney has a point in criticizing some of the Obama administration's statements about the attack. The violence in Libya and simultaneous unruly protests at the American embassy in Cairo were ostensibly sparked by outrage over an obscure, unreleased film that is said to depict the Prophet Muhammad negatively and criticizes the Muslim religion.
NEWS
September 12, 2012
The attack on the American consulate in Libya that left four dead, including our ambassador to that country, Chris Stevens, is outrageous and deplorable. The senseless loss of life there should be a cause of mourning for Americans, not a flash point in the presidential election. That said, Mitt Romney has a point in criticizing some of the Obama administration's statements about the attack. The violence in Libya and simultaneous unruly protests at the American embassy in Cairo were ostensibly sparked by outrage over an obscure, unreleased film that is said to depict the Prophet Muhammad negatively and criticizes the Muslim religion.
NEWS
August 4, 2011
Under our Constitution, a strong president should protect and defend the nation and the presidency from dangers both foreign and domestic. The question isn't whether Washington handled the debt ceiling crisis effectively. It didn't. The important question is why a small rogue ideological group was allowed to hold the American government hostage and create a dangerous precedent that future extremists, from the left and the right, will try to exploit. The president and congressional leaders should have resisted attempts to link two totally disparate issues: a short term self-imposed debt ceiling; and a serious recession, job shortage and long term growth and fiscal problems.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
An American government exam taken by all high school students in Maryland would be eliminated next year under the proposed state budget, a surprising shift in policy that comes just three years after the test was made a graduation requirement. Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal cuts $1.9 million from the Maryland State Department of Education budget that would pay for the test and its grading. However, the legislature could still restore the test if it found the funding. Some educators expressed immediate concern that social studies would get less attention in high schools if the test is eliminated.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Ned Parker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 2008
BAGHDAD - Australian troops ended their main combat mission in Iraq yesterday, handing over their responsibilities in southern Iraq to U.S. forces. An estimated 550 Australian troops, who served in a training and backup role to Iraqi forces in the provinces of Dhi Qar and Muthanna, made the transfer in a ceremony at Camp Talil outside Nasiriya, said Capt. Chris Ford, a British military spokesman in southern Iraq. Meanwhile, U.S. officials announced that a bomb killed an American soldier yesterday in Baghdad.
TOPIC
By Bill Sloat | August 19, 2001
CINCINNATI - Their brief ritual seemed straight from a James Bond novel. The American, speaking first, would say in Latin, "Vincit qui se vincit." (He conquers who conquers himself.) The European man, code-named Dynamo, would reply, "Verbum pat sapienti." (A word is enough for a wise man.) Then they would match halves of a torn playing card, the nine of diamonds. While this scene may have been common during the Cold War, Dynamo was no common spy. Documents unsealed in a case recently settled in Cincinnati federal court reveal that the man called Dynamo was paid to spy for the U.S. government - even though intelligence reports showed that he was considered a Nazi war criminal in Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 15, 1997
MEXICO CITY -- It has been a wretched year for Carlos Peralta, a swaggering young cellular-phone tycoon.First, he was caught up in a corruption scandal, with the revelation that he had funneled millions of dollars to the brother of former Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari. That led to his ouster as vice chairman of his company, Grupo Iusacell.But perhaps the worst news came in a phone call to his Mexico City home one recent morning: Peralta had been indicted for tax fraud.The indictment came about the time Mexicans, like Americans, face their annual tax deadline -- and symbolized a dramatic change in Latin America.
NEWS
August 4, 2011
Under our Constitution, a strong president should protect and defend the nation and the presidency from dangers both foreign and domestic. The question isn't whether Washington handled the debt ceiling crisis effectively. It didn't. The important question is why a small rogue ideological group was allowed to hold the American government hostage and create a dangerous precedent that future extremists, from the left and the right, will try to exploit. The president and congressional leaders should have resisted attempts to link two totally disparate issues: a short term self-imposed debt ceiling; and a serious recession, job shortage and long term growth and fiscal problems.
TOPIC
By Bill Sloat | August 19, 2001
CINCINNATI - Their brief ritual seemed straight from a James Bond novel. The American, speaking first, would say in Latin, "Vincit qui se vincit." (He conquers who conquers himself.) The European man, code-named Dynamo, would reply, "Verbum pat sapienti." (A word is enough for a wise man.) Then they would match halves of a torn playing card, the nine of diamonds. While this scene may have been common during the Cold War, Dynamo was no common spy. Documents unsealed in a case recently settled in Cincinnati federal court reveal that the man called Dynamo was paid to spy for the U.S. government - even though intelligence reports showed that he was considered a Nazi war criminal in Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 1996
CAIRO, Egypt -- The most powerful group of Muslim militants here has vowed to strike back at U.S. targets in revenge for the life sentence that was handed down against Sheik Omar Abdel Rahman in New York last week."
NEWS
By LAWRENCE M. O'ROURKE | December 26, 1994
Washington. -- Given the tendency of the American press and public to focus on personalities of politicians, it is not surprising that House Speaker-to-be Newt Gingrich of Georgia has emerged as hero of the Republican takeover of Congress.Mr. Gingrich is a rags-to-riches story. Just a few years ago, he was a Republican back-bencher distinguished by disdain for his party's leadership. He was a fountain of untested ideas and flamboyant criticism. Now he sits as third man from the presidency, pursued by book publishers with big checkbooks, about to impose his hard-edged theories on the nation.
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