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By Rafael Alvarez | October 17, 1991
Barnum would have loved this gig.Muscle-bound men and women with names like "Thunder" and "Storm" dress up in red, white and blue and try to pulverize local mortals in front of the hometown crowd.Oh boy.It's your "American Gladiators," sort of the Roller Derby of the '90s, and they lumbered into the Baltimore Arena on tour last night to take on eight Marylanders who work as prison guards and financial analysts and Realtors when they're not fighting Gladiators.Said Joseph W. Garrison of Brooklyn Park: "We're rag dolls for them to throw around and make them look that much more powerful."
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By RICK MAESE | June 16, 2007
OAKMONT, Pa.-- --There was a point midway through the second round of the U.S. Open when you couldn't tell whether we were talking about a golf tournament or a Die Hard sequel. The dejected duffers were scorned, hurt and a little scared. The course at Oakmont Country Club is "mean," they bellowed. And "treacherous" and "dangerous." Golfers were shocked at the "carnage" being scattered over western Pennsylvania. Puh-leez. These pretty boys with pleats probably confuse The View with Ultimate Fighting, too. That's why it was so refreshing to learn after two rounds of the Open that a guy named Bubba was nearly leading the thing.
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By John Barry and John Barry,Knight-Ridder Newspapers AJB | March 13, 1992
Now that "The Cosby Show" has taped its final episode, let it be said the show was indeed a good thing, very positive, inspiring, constructive and wholesome ... but ... really, wouldn't a tiny, just barely perceptible streak of perversity, have made it more interesting?Advertising Age asked its readers for piquant themes for "The Cosby Show" and they pounded out:* Mike Tyson, William Kennedy Smith and Clarence Thomas, guest-starring as themselves, gang up on Rudy on the playground during recess and beat her up.* Dr. Huxtable buys a Harley, joins the Hell's Angels, becomes known as "Dr. Death" and terrorizes Doogie Howser.
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By Libby Slate and Libby Slate,Los Angeles Times | May 19, 1995
Hollywood -- While most people consider the Daytime Emmys a bubble fest, soaps and their glamorous stars aren't the only prize winners in the show.In fact, in this year's 22nd annual awards celebration, airing tonight on NBC, daytime programs other than soap operas lead the total nomination tally, 179 to 79.Ironically enough, some of the nominations in the "non-soap" categories of talk, game/audience participation, service, children's, animation and special-class...
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By Jean Marbella | October 16, 1991
A hint to the "Maryland Gladiators" competing tonight at the Baltimore Arena against those champs of the big biceps and big hair set, the "American Gladiators": Get tougher names for yourselves!We're sure Eric Evans, James Gordon, Laura Majchrzak, Shetha McKenzie, Chaz Riddle, Ronald Sanders, Sharon Stouers and Barbara Wohndutka are tough -- they did beat out hundreds of others in local auditions on Sept. 16 to take on the heroes of that cult TV show, "American Gladiators." (Joe Garrison, Laura Lippman, Ivory Turner and Cherle Sparks were chosen as alternates as well.
FEATURES
By Libby Slate and Libby Slate,Los Angeles Times | May 19, 1995
Hollywood -- While most people consider the Daytime Emmys a bubble fest, soaps and their glamorous stars aren't the only prize winners in the show.In fact, in this year's 22nd annual awards celebration, airing tonight on NBC, daytime programs other than soap operas lead the total nomination tally, 179 to 79.Ironically enough, some of the nominations in the "non-soap" categories of talk, game/audience participation, service, children's, animation and special-class...
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By Michael Hill | May 22, 1991
So can Dabney Coleman do what three fat women couldn't: keep the Bart and Homer fans around? That's what Fox intends to find out come September.The highlight of the fourth network's fall schedule, announced yesterday, was Coleman's return to prime time, once again playing the type of nasty character that endeared him to the American viewing public in "Buffalo Bill" and "Slap Maxwell."This time, Coleman will be Otis Drexell, a con man who was convicted of tax evasion and avoided jail by agreeing to teach fourth grade.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | June 16, 2007
OAKMONT, Pa.-- --There was a point midway through the second round of the U.S. Open when you couldn't tell whether we were talking about a golf tournament or a Die Hard sequel. The dejected duffers were scorned, hurt and a little scared. The course at Oakmont Country Club is "mean," they bellowed. And "treacherous" and "dangerous." Golfers were shocked at the "carnage" being scattered over western Pennsylvania. Puh-leez. These pretty boys with pleats probably confuse The View with Ultimate Fighting, too. That's why it was so refreshing to learn after two rounds of the Open that a guy named Bubba was nearly leading the thing.
FEATURES
By Trish Hall and Trish Hall,New York Times News Service | July 27, 1991
Maybe it's the competition, or the hint of violence, or the skimpy costumes. Or maybe it's just the novelty for television audiences that have seen everything.Whatever the reason, "American Gladiators," a syndicated program shown by more than 150 stations nationwide -- including WJZ (Channel 13) which broadcasts it at 12:30 p.m. Saturdays -- is drawing more viewers every week who find something special in its peculiar melding of sporting event and game show.Although the show is hardly ready for prime time, its steadily growing ratings, up from 2.8 in September 1989 to 4.9 currently, make it one of the most successful syndicated programs on television after nearly two years on the air.Between 12 million and 15 million people every week watch the show, which is syndicated by the Samuel Goldwyn Co. in Los Angeles.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 22, 2008
Here we go again. Another wave of reality TV has started to wash across the prime-time landscape. And while the controversial genre has been on the rise for the past seven years, network programmers appear to have found a few new ways to shock - a sensation viewers seem to love despite all the public griping. NBC's American Gladiators, a trash-camp orgy of muscle-bound combat, returned to the airwaves Jan. 6 with 12 million viewers and a lot of morning-after chatter. Last week, the most successful series in TV history, American Idol, rebooted for a new season with an opening night cast of cringe-ably bad performers and an audience of 33.2 million.
FEATURES
By John Barry and John Barry,Knight-Ridder Newspapers AJB | March 13, 1992
Now that "The Cosby Show" has taped its final episode, let it be said the show was indeed a good thing, very positive, inspiring, constructive and wholesome ... but ... really, wouldn't a tiny, just barely perceptible streak of perversity, have made it more interesting?Advertising Age asked its readers for piquant themes for "The Cosby Show" and they pounded out:* Mike Tyson, William Kennedy Smith and Clarence Thomas, guest-starring as themselves, gang up on Rudy on the playground during recess and beat her up.* Dr. Huxtable buys a Harley, joins the Hell's Angels, becomes known as "Dr. Death" and terrorizes Doogie Howser.
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez | October 17, 1991
Barnum would have loved this gig.Muscle-bound men and women with names like "Thunder" and "Storm" dress up in red, white and blue and try to pulverize local mortals in front of the hometown crowd.Oh boy.It's your "American Gladiators," sort of the Roller Derby of the '90s, and they lumbered into the Baltimore Arena on tour last night to take on eight Marylanders who work as prison guards and financial analysts and Realtors when they're not fighting Gladiators.Said Joseph W. Garrison of Brooklyn Park: "We're rag dolls for them to throw around and make them look that much more powerful."
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | October 16, 1991
A hint to the "Maryland Gladiators" competing tonight at the Baltimore Arena against those champs of the big biceps and big hair set, the "American Gladiators": Get tougher names for yourselves!We're sure Eric Evans, James Gordon, Laura Majchrzak, Shetha McKenzie, Chaz Riddle, Ronald Sanders, Sharon Stouers and Barbara Wohndutka are tough -- they did beat out hundreds of others in local auditions on Sept. 16 to take on the heroes of that cult TV show, "American Gladiators." (Joe Garrison, Laura Lippman, Ivory Turner and Cherle Sparks were chosen as alternates as well.
FEATURES
By Trish Hall and Trish Hall,New York Times News Service | July 27, 1991
Maybe it's the competition, or the hint of violence, or the skimpy costumes. Or maybe it's just the novelty for television audiences that have seen everything.Whatever the reason, "American Gladiators," a syndicated program shown by more than 150 stations nationwide -- including WJZ (Channel 13) which broadcasts it at 12:30 p.m. Saturdays -- is drawing more viewers every week who find something special in its peculiar melding of sporting event and game show.Although the show is hardly ready for prime time, its steadily growing ratings, up from 2.8 in September 1989 to 4.9 currently, make it one of the most successful syndicated programs on television after nearly two years on the air.Between 12 million and 15 million people every week watch the show, which is syndicated by the Samuel Goldwyn Co. in Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | May 22, 1991
So can Dabney Coleman do what three fat women couldn't: keep the Bart and Homer fans around? That's what Fox intends to find out come September.The highlight of the fourth network's fall schedule, announced yesterday, was Coleman's return to prime time, once again playing the type of nasty character that endeared him to the American viewing public in "Buffalo Bill" and "Slap Maxwell."This time, Coleman will be Otis Drexell, a con man who was convicted of tax evasion and avoided jail by agreeing to teach fourth grade.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | September 12, 1991
You've armchair-wrestled them on Saturday nights, now see if you're tough or crazy enough to take them on in real life."American Gladiators," a weekly television show in which 10 professional hunk and hunk-ettes battle amateur challengers, will be in Baltimore Monday looking for victims, er, competitors. The one-hour show, which airs locally on WJZ-TV at 12:30 a.m. Saturday, has developed a cult following in its two-year history.Tryouts for challengers will be held at 5 p.m. at the Baltimore Arena, and the winners will then compete against the actual Gladiators in an Oct. 16 show at the arena.
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