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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2003
Having launched a movement to try to keep the nation from going to war, peace activists in Maryland and across America are now asking: Where do we go from here? Unlike the Vietnam era, when protests grew louder as the war dragged on, most activists today said they have no illusions that continued demonstrations might help end the war. Instead, they said their goals are to press the Bush administration on critical issues of how the war is waged, whether the nation will continue a policy of pre-emptive strikes and what the costs are to cities.
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NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | March 27, 2014
'I told you so.' That's what I'm sure most of my Romanian friends would tell me about Russia's heavy handed assault on Ukraine - if they weren't so polite. Almost from the day I arrived in Bucharest in February 1998 (when Boris Yeltsin, not Vladimir Putin, was President of Russia), Romanians tried to convince me that the U.S. was naive about Russia. There was - and is - plenty of evidence to support their view. I remember particularly a Saturday in June 1999 as the war in Kosovo was ending.
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NEWS
By Reported by Frank P. L. Somerville | May 12, 1995
"Religion in the Public Schools" is the subject of a seminar for teachers, clergy and parents to be held May 31 at St. Mary's Seminary and University, 5400 Roland Ave.Speakers and discussion leaders will bring Jewish, Protestant and Roman Catholic perspectives to the questions of how and whether religious values should be taught to public school students.The 3:30 p.m.-to-6 p.m. program is co-sponsored by the Baltimore chapter of the American Jewish Committee and the Ecumenical Institute at the seminary.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 23, 2013
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the younger of the two brothers accused of perpetrating the Boston Marathon bombing, is the baffling mystery man in this crime. His older brother, Tamerlan, who died in a shootout with police in the dark early hours Friday morning, better fits the stereotype of a disaffected, nascent terrorist. He was nearing adulthood when he came to this country from Russia's predominantly Muslim central Asian region. He talked of having no American friends. He had openly disdained the immorality of American society and adopted a zealous brand of Islam.
NEWS
By Richard Holbrooke | February 25, 1992
IN THE last two months, U.S.-Japanese relations have deteriorated more quickly than at any time since the Tokyo anti-American demonstrations of 1960. Yet nothing fundamental has changed between the two nations. It is quite simply the result of a failure of leadership on both sides.That this has occurred is particularly puzzling because George Bush and Kiichi Miyazawa are both personal friends and knowledgeable about each other's countries. Neither could have wanted this to happen, yet ultimately the current crisis can be laid to their own actions and statements.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 23, 2013
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the younger of the two brothers accused of perpetrating the Boston Marathon bombing, is the baffling mystery man in this crime. His older brother, Tamerlan, who died in a shootout with police in the dark early hours Friday morning, better fits the stereotype of a disaffected, nascent terrorist. He was nearing adulthood when he came to this country from Russia's predominantly Muslim central Asian region. He talked of having no American friends. He had openly disdained the immorality of American society and adopted a zealous brand of Islam.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | March 27, 2014
'I told you so.' That's what I'm sure most of my Romanian friends would tell me about Russia's heavy handed assault on Ukraine - if they weren't so polite. Almost from the day I arrived in Bucharest in February 1998 (when Boris Yeltsin, not Vladimir Putin, was President of Russia), Romanians tried to convince me that the U.S. was naive about Russia. There was - and is - plenty of evidence to support their view. I remember particularly a Saturday in June 1999 as the war in Kosovo was ending.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Joan A. Parr, a homemaker and peace activist, died Tuesday from heart failure at her Lauraville home. She was 84. The former Joan Atkins was born in Springfield, Mass., and moved to Baltimore in 1945, when her father joined the upper school math faculty at Park School. After graduating from Park in 1946, she earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1950 from Goucher College. During the early 1950s, she worked as an administrative assistant at the Baltimore Broom Machine Co. In 1951, she married Albert Gilmore Kinsey, who was a food service company personnel director.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 2001
TALOQAN, Afghanistan - Two weeks ago, Abdullah Mohammed Massin was cooking plain lentils for Taliban commanders who didn't appreciate good food anyway. Yesterday, he cooked up a turkey, Afghan-style, for a homesick American and a small group of colleagues. The dinner he laid out was lacking in cranberry sauce and stuffing and potatoes and other items that the homesick American's wife calls the non-negotiables of Thanksgiving. But Massin is a self-confessed happy man, and how could that not rub off in a catch-as-catch-can place such as Afghanistan?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin D. Thompson and By Kevin D. Thompson,Cox News Service | March 3, 2005
You can't take your eyes off Shohreh Aghdashloo. It's not because she's strikingly beautiful. She is. Or because her voice is deeper than Barry White's. It seems like it. Or because she's a good actress. She was nominated for an Oscar for House of Sand and Fog. No, it's because the 52-year-old Iranian actress is playing a chillingly sinister Middle Eastern terrorist on 24. As the wickedly cunning Dina Araz, Aghdashloo is stealing every scene she's in with her icy looks, throaty voice and scary ability to poison her son's girlfriend with ease.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Joan A. Parr, a homemaker and peace activist, died Tuesday from heart failure at her Lauraville home. She was 84. The former Joan Atkins was born in Springfield, Mass., and moved to Baltimore in 1945, when her father joined the upper school math faculty at Park School. After graduating from Park in 1946, she earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1950 from Goucher College. During the early 1950s, she worked as an administrative assistant at the Baltimore Broom Machine Co. In 1951, she married Albert Gilmore Kinsey, who was a food service company personnel director.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2003
Having launched a movement to try to keep the nation from going to war, peace activists in Maryland and across America are now asking: Where do we go from here? Unlike the Vietnam era, when protests grew louder as the war dragged on, most activists today said they have no illusions that continued demonstrations might help end the war. Instead, they said their goals are to press the Bush administration on critical issues of how the war is waged, whether the nation will continue a policy of pre-emptive strikes and what the costs are to cities.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 2001
TALOQAN, Afghanistan - Two weeks ago, Abdullah Mohammed Massin was cooking plain lentils for Taliban commanders who didn't appreciate good food anyway. Yesterday, he cooked up a turkey, Afghan-style, for a homesick American and a small group of colleagues. The dinner he laid out was lacking in cranberry sauce and stuffing and potatoes and other items that the homesick American's wife calls the non-negotiables of Thanksgiving. But Massin is a self-confessed happy man, and how could that not rub off in a catch-as-catch-can place such as Afghanistan?
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P. L. Somerville | May 12, 1995
"Religion in the Public Schools" is the subject of a seminar for teachers, clergy and parents to be held May 31 at St. Mary's Seminary and University, 5400 Roland Ave.Speakers and discussion leaders will bring Jewish, Protestant and Roman Catholic perspectives to the questions of how and whether religious values should be taught to public school students.The 3:30 p.m.-to-6 p.m. program is co-sponsored by the Baltimore chapter of the American Jewish Committee and the Ecumenical Institute at the seminary.
NEWS
By Richard Holbrooke | February 25, 1992
IN THE last two months, U.S.-Japanese relations have deteriorated more quickly than at any time since the Tokyo anti-American demonstrations of 1960. Yet nothing fundamental has changed between the two nations. It is quite simply the result of a failure of leadership on both sides.That this has occurred is particularly puzzling because George Bush and Kiichi Miyazawa are both personal friends and knowledgeable about each other's countries. Neither could have wanted this to happen, yet ultimately the current crisis can be laid to their own actions and statements.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Expanding NATO is a boon for U.S. defense contractors but a strain for taxpayers, who will wind up paying for some of the military equipment Eastern Europe needs to join the alliance, according to a study released yesterday by the World Policy Institute arms-control group.Bethesda's Lockheed Martin Corp. has been the most aggressive defense contractor in pushing for Eastern and Central European countries to modernize their armies, and in lobbying for the United States to help those countries pay for the goods, the study's author said.
NEWS
January 4, 2005
On December 18, 2004, MARGARET NEUSTADT RANDOL. A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, January 8, at 11 A.M. at the Stony Run Friends Meeting (5116 N. Charles Street; parking in the Friends School Parking lot below). In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to the American Friends Service Committee (4806 York Road, Baltimore, 21212).
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