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NEWS
June 26, 2005
Trade agreements would be disasters President Bush continues to insist that the entangling of Canada, Mexico and the United States in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has been a grand success, not withstanding the fact that NAFTA has [cost] close to a million American jobs. Furthermore, a NAFTA tribunal claimed supremacy over our state and federal courts in a dispute involving a Canadian real estate company. The April 18, 2004, New York Times reported comments of Abner Mikva, a former member of Congress and former federal appeals court judge, "If Congress had known there was anything like this in NAFTA, they would never have voted for it."
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NEWS
June 26, 2005
Trade agreements would be disasters President Bush continues to insist that the entangling of Canada, Mexico and the United States in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has been a grand success, not withstanding the fact that NAFTA has [cost] close to a million American jobs. Furthermore, a NAFTA tribunal claimed supremacy over our state and federal courts in a dispute involving a Canadian real estate company. The April 18, 2004, New York Times reported comments of Abner Mikva, a former member of Congress and former federal appeals court judge, "If Congress had known there was anything like this in NAFTA, they would never have voted for it."
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Only four months before Congress is expected to vote on the sweeping package of economic changes known as the North American Free Trade Agreement, a New York Times/CBS News poll finds that nearly half of Americans say they have not heard anything about the agreement.Although President Clinton has often spoken of the consumer benefits of global trade, as he did repeatedly in Tokyo last week, FTC the White House seems to be letting others set the agenda for the national debate on the North American pact.
NEWS
By Christopher C. Schons | May 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - Congress must ratify the pending Central American Free Trade Agreement for one reason: national security. While much of our country's attention has been focused on Iraq, a series of troubling events, political and otherwise, have occurred in South America: Argentina has suffered economic collapse and, despite a recent recovery, remains a financial pariah. In oil-rich Venezuela, the erratic and autocratic President Hugo Chavez - in league with Fidel Castro of Cuba - has consolidated his power over his own dismayed population and extended his overtly anti-U.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration conceded yesterday that the controversial North American Free Trade Agreement has produced only "modest" benefits for the United States so far, but rejected claims by critics that the pact is hurting U.S. wages and jobs.In a 140-page report to Congress, the White House argues that NAFTA has caused increases in U.S. exports to Mexico, along with higher income, investment and jobs on both sides of the border as Mexico carries out its promises to reduce barriers to investment and trade.
NEWS
July 22, 1994
President Clinton had better start paying close attention to the state of trade legislation if he is to attain his key economic objective on Capitol Hill this year. While he is focused on such blue-ribbon domestic issues as health care and welfare reform, the rest of the world is waiting for Congress to ratify the vast liberalization in global commerce negotiated over seven hard years under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.What had seemed a fairly routine ritual under which Congress would find revenues to offset a projected five-year $12 billion loss in tariff receipts is developing into an ideological battle over the linkage of trade with environmental and labor standards.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | July 3, 1993
Maryland's globe-trotting governor will dabble in foreign affairs again when he meets with Mexico's president about the ** North American Free Trade Agreement this month.In his second international trip in as many months, Gov. William Donald Schaefer will meet with business and government officials July 16-20 in Guadalajara and Mexico City.He will meet with Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari and offer to drum up support in Maryland for the trade agreement, said Curt Matthews, a spokesman for the International Division of the state's Department of Economic and Employment Development (DEED)
NEWS
November 11, 1997
PRESIDENT CLINTON'S failure to convince Congress to give him fast track negotiating authority reverses the movement toward free world trade that has helped this country to prosper for the past half-century. The momentum still exists elsewhere, but for now the U.S. is the dragging anchor, not the propeller.Mr. Clinton was right to call off the vote in the House rather than be repudiated there, but the difference is not great. He failed to persuade most Democratic representatives to support him where most Republican representatives do. His chances next year, because of congressional elections, are less.
NEWS
By Christopher C. Schons | May 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - Congress must ratify the pending Central American Free Trade Agreement for one reason: national security. While much of our country's attention has been focused on Iraq, a series of troubling events, political and otherwise, have occurred in South America: Argentina has suffered economic collapse and, despite a recent recovery, remains a financial pariah. In oil-rich Venezuela, the erratic and autocratic President Hugo Chavez - in league with Fidel Castro of Cuba - has consolidated his power over his own dismayed population and extended his overtly anti-U.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 6, 2005
WHAT IS Chris Van Hollen so shy about? The Montgomery County congressman and possible candidate for Paul Sarbanes' Senate seat just got a well-deserved nod from the Cato Institute for his support of free trade. But he doesn't want to talk about it. I tried three times recently to interview him about his status as one of only seven of the think tank's "most consistent free traders" in the House - and one of only two Democrats. "He is interested in the issue," spokeswoman Marilyn Campbell said.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 6, 2005
WHAT IS Chris Van Hollen so shy about? The Montgomery County congressman and possible candidate for Paul Sarbanes' Senate seat just got a well-deserved nod from the Cato Institute for his support of free trade. But he doesn't want to talk about it. I tried three times recently to interview him about his status as one of only seven of the think tank's "most consistent free traders" in the House - and one of only two Democrats. "He is interested in the issue," spokeswoman Marilyn Campbell said.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 22, 2000
CELINA, Tenn. - For decades in this once-bustling town, aside from hunting and fishing, one thing was certain: OshKosh B'Gosh. The clothing factory had employed generation after generation, from high school through old age. But in 1994 came the North American Free Trade Agreement, and soon OshKosh closed its plants here in favor of cheaper operations outside the United States. Twelve hundred people lost their jobs. The county's unemployment rate shot up to 35 percent (worse than the national rate during the Great Depression.
NEWS
By Michael Riley and Michael Riley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 1998
EL PASO, Texas -- Celia Rodriguez came to the United States more than 30 years ago from Mexico. For most of that time, she lived out the immigrant's dream. She advanced through several jobs in clothing factories and became an inspector. She married, raised a family and became a citizen.The dream soured in 1996 when, responding to the incentives of the North American Free Trade Agreement, the garment industry fled this west-Texas border town. Rodriguez lost her job. Though she has gone through a federal retraining program and is still job-hunting, she hasn't worked since.
NEWS
November 11, 1997
PRESIDENT CLINTON'S failure to convince Congress to give him fast track negotiating authority reverses the movement toward free world trade that has helped this country to prosper for the past half-century. The momentum still exists elsewhere, but for now the U.S. is the dragging anchor, not the propeller.Mr. Clinton was right to call off the vote in the House rather than be repudiated there, but the difference is not great. He failed to persuade most Democratic representatives to support him where most Republican representatives do. His chances next year, because of congressional elections, are less.
NEWS
November 6, 1997
CONGRESS would grievously harm American workers, farmers, consumers, businesses and investors if it deprived President Clinton of the power to negotiate in trade arenas that Presidents Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton had used and needed. It would be sending him, or any successor, out to defend American interests with both hands tied behind his back.That is what the struggle to extend "fast track" negotiating authority is about. It is not about giving the president a necessary tool, but taking one away.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | September 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton says the decision about whether he wins "fast-track" authority to negotiate trade agreements is a matter of deciding whether "to advance or retreat." In political terms, however, it is far more complex.The president can make a persuasive case for being given the same flexibility Congress has given every president since Gerald R. Ford and almost routinely approved for George Bush six years ago. The mind boggles at the prospect of Congress picking apart every trade agreement clause by clause rather than being required to vote either acceptance or rejection, as fast-track provides.
NEWS
April 18, 1993
President Clinton's decision to seek legislation that will enable him to push for worldwide trade reform before the end of the year raises questions about his political acumen in dealing with Congress. After going into battle with Republicans over his $16.3 billion jobs-stimulus plan, the president will soon be needing GOP votes -- plenty of them -- to overcome strong protectionist sentiment in Democratic ranks. This being the case, you have to wonder if White House strategists have yet learned to look beyond one issue at a time.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Bucking organized labor and Democratic leaders in Congress once again, President Clinton launched another fight over global trade yesterday.In a reprise of his uphill -- and ultimately successful -- fight four years ago to get the North American Free Trade Agreement approved, Clinton is seeking "fast-track" authority to negotiate trade agreements with foreign countries.Under fast-track, a power routinely granted every president since the mid-1970s, the administration is given authority to hammer out trade agreements that Congress can vote either up or down -- without amending or altering the proposed treaty.
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