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NEWS
By Edward Flattau | October 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A national conservation organization has conducted a study of how much tree cover an urban center needs to sustain a high quality of life -- and guess what? Nary a city (with the possible exception of Minneapolis) approaches the arboreal goal.With the aid of urban silviculturists, the organization American Forests developed a minimum healthy tree-cover standard: At least 40 percent of a metropolitan area's acreage should have a tree canopy.Few cities come even close to meeting this leafy standard.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2010
On Broad Creek Boy Scout Reservation in northern Harford County, thousands of trees cover nearly 1,700 acres. But only one ranks as the champion. A 136-foot-tall Eastern hemlock, deep within the densest part of the forest, has earned national recognition. By reason of its height, girth and crown, the conifer has secured a place on the American Forests' 2010 National Register of Champion Trees. It has been found to be the largest example of its species in the country. Its age, estimated at 310 years, makes the champion the granddaddy of the woods that line Broad Creek, a swift-flowing waterway that feeds the Susquehanna River.
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
IN RESTORING environmental quality, there's an understandable tendency to focus on reducing pollutants that directly degrade water and air quality.Equally important, however, is improving what one might call environmental "resilience" -- the systems that help nature help itself to reduce pollution.With oysters, dredging long ago leveled the reef structures in which shellfish grew best. Draining wetlands removed an important filtering system. The vast meadows of submerged grasses driven from the bay by pollution absorbed huge quantities of pollutants.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Special to The Sun | June 1, 2008
As a child playing under its branches in the 1930s, Michael Jenkins Cromwell Jr. knew that the massive elm near his Baltimore County home was extraordinary. "It was the largest and oldest tree, going back to Revolutionary times," he said. Decades later, others would be charmed by the majestic tree. Soon after buying their house near Brooklandville, Charles and Anita Stapleton decided to contact state foresters to measure the tree in their backyard. That call set into motion a chain of events that led to their tree being recognized as the largest American elm in the nation.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Special to The Sun | April 30, 2008
Howard County is home to the national champion bigleaf magnolia tree, even though no one knows how it came to be so far outside its home range in the South. American Forests, a nonprofit conservation organization, has included the tree in its National Register of Big Trees, a biennial listing of the largest known trees in 826 species. The 2008-2009 register was released Friday for National Arbor Day. The bigleaf magnolia, located at a farm in West Friendship, stands 55 feet tall, measures more than 12 feet around the trunk.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
IT'S OLD news that we have been steadily losing forests around the bay's metropolitan regions during recent decades. Most probably think that it's regrettable, and many no doubt think it's a crying shame. But beyond lamentation, so what? What exactly does it mean when trees fall to development? How about the costs to the public health and to water quality, and the public works budgets of $4.5 million a year during the last decade in the Jones Falls watershed of Baltimore City and Baltimore County?
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Special to The Sun | June 1, 2008
As a child playing under its branches in the 1930s, Michael Jenkins Cromwell Jr. knew that the massive elm near his Baltimore County home was extraordinary. "It was the largest and oldest tree, going back to Revolutionary times," he said. Decades later, others would be charmed by the majestic tree. Soon after buying their house near Brooklandville, Charles and Anita Stapleton decided to contact state foresters to measure the tree in their backyard. That call set into motion a chain of events that led to their tree being recognized as the largest American elm in the nation.
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1997
Will Baltimore become a desert, just another hot dry spot on the map?It's a nightmarish thought, but not an impossible one. Consider the trend-line:More than 31 percent of the Baltimore area, including the city and a thin ring of suburbs, is sheltered by trees; 17 percent is covered by grass. The rest -- more than half the land in the metro area -- is under brick, concrete or asphalt.This impervious cover is advancing the way a sandy desert advances. Little by little, it eats the green.The canopy is shrinking.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
Watching children plant 117 saplings at Joppa View Elementary School in Baltimore County yesterday, Melvin Noland pointed to a hill near the school's parking lot."See that slope there," he said. "Someday, all that could be trees and shrubs."A member of Baltimore County's forestry board, Noland knows the value of a tree and how small hands can rebuild forests and wetlands demolished by shopping centers and housing tracts.He was part of the team of adults and children who broke up root balls and hefted buckets of mulch and water at the White Marsh school, which has stands of trees nearby but none close enough to shade classrooms and playgrounds.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2010
On Broad Creek Boy Scout Reservation in northern Harford County, thousands of trees cover nearly 1,700 acres. But only one ranks as the champion. A 136-foot-tall Eastern hemlock, deep within the densest part of the forest, has earned national recognition. By reason of its height, girth and crown, the conifer has secured a place on the American Forests' 2010 National Register of Champion Trees. It has been found to be the largest example of its species in the country. Its age, estimated at 310 years, makes the champion the granddaddy of the woods that line Broad Creek, a swift-flowing waterway that feeds the Susquehanna River.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Special to The Sun | April 30, 2008
Howard County is home to the national champion bigleaf magnolia tree, even though no one knows how it came to be so far outside its home range in the South. American Forests, a nonprofit conservation organization, has included the tree in its National Register of Big Trees, a biennial listing of the largest known trees in 826 species. The 2008-2009 register was released Friday for National Arbor Day. The bigleaf magnolia, located at a farm in West Friendship, stands 55 feet tall, measures more than 12 feet around the trunk.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
IT'S OLD news that we have been steadily losing forests around the bay's metropolitan regions during recent decades. Most probably think that it's regrettable, and many no doubt think it's a crying shame. But beyond lamentation, so what? What exactly does it mean when trees fall to development? How about the costs to the public health and to water quality, and the public works budgets of $4.5 million a year during the last decade in the Jones Falls watershed of Baltimore City and Baltimore County?
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
Watching children plant 117 saplings at Joppa View Elementary School in Baltimore County yesterday, Melvin Noland pointed to a hill near the school's parking lot."See that slope there," he said. "Someday, all that could be trees and shrubs."A member of Baltimore County's forestry board, Noland knows the value of a tree and how small hands can rebuild forests and wetlands demolished by shopping centers and housing tracts.He was part of the team of adults and children who broke up root balls and hefted buckets of mulch and water at the White Marsh school, which has stands of trees nearby but none close enough to shade classrooms and playgrounds.
FEATURES
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 16, 1999
SEATTLE -- Coffee in Seattle always has been about more than a caffeine jolt to start your day, or a cuppa joe to go with a piece of pie. No, in Seattle coffee is an affirmation of individual good taste in a world of supermarket shelf mediocrity, a fragrant bowl of warmth on a morning chilly with rain.Some would like it to be more. Folk singer Danny O'Keefe, who roasts his own beans in a popcorn popper, believes those who pick up a cup should be thinking about where their coffee came from and whether the beans at the corner espresso stand were farmed on clear-cut forests in Central America.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
IN RESTORING environmental quality, there's an understandable tendency to focus on reducing pollutants that directly degrade water and air quality.Equally important, however, is improving what one might call environmental "resilience" -- the systems that help nature help itself to reduce pollution.With oysters, dredging long ago leveled the reef structures in which shellfish grew best. Draining wetlands removed an important filtering system. The vast meadows of submerged grasses driven from the bay by pollution absorbed huge quantities of pollutants.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 31, 1998
At first glance, "Hope Floats" doesn't look like a revolutionary film.The romantic drama stars Sandra Bullock and Harry Connick Jr., both young, attractive and appealing. Its setting is the all-American town of Smithville, Texas. Its subject matter - a young wife who comes to terms with a philandering husband by returning to her small hometown - doesn't exactly sizzle with controversy. And the film's director, Forest Whitaker, is a proven master of the "chick flick," having shepherded Terry McMillan's best-selling romantic novel "Waiting to Exhale" to the screen and big box-office returns.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1994
Centuries of charm and fantasy bloom in little shopBetty Branson is filling me in on the workings of her antiques store/flower shop/gallery. "I just sold another gargoyle today," she says brightly. I had noticed a gargoyle outside on the stoop, chained to the front of Gallery Elizabeth along with a painted World War I artillery chest. The gargoyles fit right in with the general sense of fantasy at this odd little shop, filled with fresh flowers, dried arrangements and wreaths, fairy lights, turn-of-the-century and Civil War items, and Heidi the cat curled up on the counter.
FEATURES
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 16, 1999
SEATTLE -- Coffee in Seattle always has been about more than a caffeine jolt to start your day, or a cuppa joe to go with a piece of pie. No, in Seattle coffee is an affirmation of individual good taste in a world of supermarket shelf mediocrity, a fragrant bowl of warmth on a morning chilly with rain.Some would like it to be more. Folk singer Danny O'Keefe, who roasts his own beans in a popcorn popper, believes those who pick up a cup should be thinking about where their coffee came from and whether the beans at the corner espresso stand were farmed on clear-cut forests in Central America.
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1997
Will Baltimore become a desert, just another hot dry spot on the map?It's a nightmarish thought, but not an impossible one. Consider the trend-line:More than 31 percent of the Baltimore area, including the city and a thin ring of suburbs, is sheltered by trees; 17 percent is covered by grass. The rest -- more than half the land in the metro area -- is under brick, concrete or asphalt.This impervious cover is advancing the way a sandy desert advances. Little by little, it eats the green.The canopy is shrinking.
NEWS
By Edward Flattau | October 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A national conservation organization has conducted a study of how much tree cover an urban center needs to sustain a high quality of life -- and guess what? Nary a city (with the possible exception of Minneapolis) approaches the arboreal goal.With the aid of urban silviculturists, the organization American Forests developed a minimum healthy tree-cover standard: At least 40 percent of a metropolitan area's acreage should have a tree canopy.Few cities come even close to meeting this leafy standard.
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