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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - American forces attacked an enemy camp in western Iraq yesterday, killing scores of fighters in the deadliest operation since President Bush declared on May 1 that the major fighting was over. The attack began shortly after midnight when American warplanes conducted a surprise bombing raid against a site that allied officers said was being used to train anti-American extremists. After the bombing, Army Special Operations Forces and troops from the 101st Airborne Division moved in on the ground, prompting a firefight.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 21, 2014
George W. Bush never claimed to be prescient, but here he is in 2007, warning us what would happen if the United States prematurely pulled its troops out of Iraq before Iraqi forces were sufficiently trained, equipped and motivated to defend the country we gave back to them after the ouster of Saddam Hussein: "To begin withdrawing before our commanders tell us we're ready would be dangerous for Iraq, for the region and for the United States....
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 16, 2011
- When President Barack Obama went to Fort Bragg the other day to proclaim the end of the nearly nine-year war in Iraq, it was hardly what you would call a traditional victory lap. There was no wild V-I Day to match the V-E and V-J Days that kicked off nationwide jubilation at the end of World War II. The most Mr. Obama could proclaim was that America wished a "welcome home" to the last of the 1.5 million American troops who had served in...
NEWS
November 1, 2013
This responds to the Oct. 17 letter by Chris Jones. "Dump the 'New Coke' educational reforms and bring back the classic. " Has Mr. Jones read the new State Standards for English Language Arts and State Standards for Mathematics?"
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,Los Angeles Times | December 15, 2007
BAGHDAD -- The U.S. military said yesterday that two American soldiers had died in separate incidents, but despite the latest deaths, December was shaping up to be the safest month for U.S. forces in Iraq since 2004. The military gave few details of the most recent casualties. Both occurred Thursday. One soldier died of wounds suffered when a bomb exploded during a foot patrol, and another was killed by gunfire in the capital. In the first two weeks of last month, 23 American military personnel had been killed, compared with 10 this month, according to the Department of Defense and www.icasualties.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Flying over Iraq this week, Maryland National Guard Col. David W. Carey surveyed miles and miles of emptiness. Where 500 U.S. bases once housed as many as 170,000 troops, the American military footprint had shrunk to two bases and 4,000 soldiers - all with orders to pack up and move out by the end of month. "It's as if you're going to a ghost town," Carey, commander of the 29th Combat Aviation Brigade, said Thursday from Iraq. "I have instructed and encouraged my soldiers to take it all in, take pictures, write stuff down, keep a journal," he said.
NEWS
By James Glanz and James Glanz,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 29, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iran's ambassador to Iraq outlined his country's ambitious plan yesterday to greatly expand economic and military ties with Iraq - including an Iranian national bank branch in the heart of the capital - that will almost certainly bring Iran into further conflict with U.S. military forces that have detained a number of Iranian operatives here in recent weeks. The ambassador, Hassan Kazemi Qumi, said Iran is prepared to offer Iraqi forces training, equipment and advisers for what he called "the security fight."
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 21, 2014
George W. Bush never claimed to be prescient, but here he is in 2007, warning us what would happen if the United States prematurely pulled its troops out of Iraq before Iraqi forces were sufficiently trained, equipped and motivated to defend the country we gave back to them after the ouster of Saddam Hussein: "To begin withdrawing before our commanders tell us we're ready would be dangerous for Iraq, for the region and for the United States....
NEWS
By LARRY WILLIAMS | January 1, 2006
Sometimes the news explodes, like a hurricane, earthquake or terrorist attack. Sometimes it creeps up glacially. These slower-moving stories that change our lives are almost always the hardest to see and understand. Here is a look at a few issues likely to have major effects on our lives in 2006: Iraq Although a majority of Americans disapproves of President Bush's handling of Iraq, the nation is closely divided on whether the decision to use military force there was right or wrong, and a majority believes it is still possible that a stable Iraqi democracy can be established.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 3, 2012
Most wars have a turning point that either signals the road to victory or the ditch of defeat. In Vietnam, the 1968 Tet Offensive by communist troops against South Vietnamese and American forces and their allies is regarded as the turning point in that conflict. Though communist forces suffered heavy losses, which would normally define defeat, CBS News anchor Walter Cronkiteand others in the U.S. media portrayed the operation as an allied loss, thus encouraging not only the anti-war movement, but North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops who believed all they had to do was hang on until America grew tired of the war and quit.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | August 3, 2013
For American forces in Afghanistan, this should be the last straw. It started in early July, when President Barack Obama was once again so furious with Afghan President Hamid Karzai that for the first time he began talking about the so-called "zero option" -- bringing home the entire American military presence next year. This came after Mr. Karzai lambasted the U.S. for trying to arrange peace negotiations with the Taliban. Lost in his latest fit of pique, Mr. Karzai summarily terminated the continuing negotiations over a long-term American presence in the state after the bulk of forces leave next year.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
After four and half years of dealing with Afghan President Harmid Karzai's temper tantrums, depressions and crazy mood swings, it's no wonder President Barack Obama has grown weary of playing baby sitter to this spoiled child of an ally. Perhaps that's why he floated a trial balloon this week, attributed to unnamed administration officials, that the U.S. might speed up the withdrawal of American and NATO forces from Afghanistan well before their previously agreed upon exit date at the end of 2014.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 3, 2012
Most wars have a turning point that either signals the road to victory or the ditch of defeat. In Vietnam, the 1968 Tet Offensive by communist troops against South Vietnamese and American forces and their allies is regarded as the turning point in that conflict. Though communist forces suffered heavy losses, which would normally define defeat, CBS News anchor Walter Cronkiteand others in the U.S. media portrayed the operation as an allied loss, thus encouraging not only the anti-war movement, but North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops who believed all they had to do was hang on until America grew tired of the war and quit.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 16, 2011
- When President Barack Obama went to Fort Bragg the other day to proclaim the end of the nearly nine-year war in Iraq, it was hardly what you would call a traditional victory lap. There was no wild V-I Day to match the V-E and V-J Days that kicked off nationwide jubilation at the end of World War II. The most Mr. Obama could proclaim was that America wished a "welcome home" to the last of the 1.5 million American troops who had served in...
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Flying over Iraq this week, Maryland National Guard Col. David W. Carey surveyed miles and miles of emptiness. Where 500 U.S. bases once housed as many as 170,000 troops, the American military footprint had shrunk to two bases and 4,000 soldiers - all with orders to pack up and move out by the end of month. "It's as if you're going to a ghost town," Carey, commander of the 29th Combat Aviation Brigade, said Thursday from Iraq. "I have instructed and encouraged my soldiers to take it all in, take pictures, write stuff down, keep a journal," he said.
SPORTS
By Liz Clarke, The Washington Post | August 7, 2011
In 16 years as a touring pro, Radek Stepanek had never faced Donald Young, a young American whose promise has been heralded since 2004. But when the two met Saturday for a place in the final of the Legg Mason Tennis Classic, the 32-year-old Stepanek knew precisely how to dismantle Young's game and quash the budding confidence the 22-year-old had gained by stringing together four victories in an ATP tournament for the first time. Aware that Young had faced a steady diet of baseline sluggers en route to his first ATP semifinal, Stepanek charged the net 20 times to disrupt his opponent's rhythm and won the point on 14. Aware that the left-handed Young liked to slice his second serve wide to yank opponents out of position, Stepanek stood inside the baseline to cut off the angle.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | August 3, 2013
For American forces in Afghanistan, this should be the last straw. It started in early July, when President Barack Obama was once again so furious with Afghan President Hamid Karzai that for the first time he began talking about the so-called "zero option" -- bringing home the entire American military presence next year. This came after Mr. Karzai lambasted the U.S. for trying to arrange peace negotiations with the Taliban. Lost in his latest fit of pique, Mr. Karzai summarily terminated the continuing negotiations over a long-term American presence in the state after the bulk of forces leave next year.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
After four and half years of dealing with Afghan President Harmid Karzai's temper tantrums, depressions and crazy mood swings, it's no wonder President Barack Obama has grown weary of playing baby sitter to this spoiled child of an ally. Perhaps that's why he floated a trial balloon this week, attributed to unnamed administration officials, that the U.S. might speed up the withdrawal of American and NATO forces from Afghanistan well before their previously agreed upon exit date at the end of 2014.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,Los Angeles Times | December 15, 2007
BAGHDAD -- The U.S. military said yesterday that two American soldiers had died in separate incidents, but despite the latest deaths, December was shaping up to be the safest month for U.S. forces in Iraq since 2004. The military gave few details of the most recent casualties. Both occurred Thursday. One soldier died of wounds suffered when a bomb exploded during a foot patrol, and another was killed by gunfire in the capital. In the first two weeks of last month, 23 American military personnel had been killed, compared with 10 this month, according to the Department of Defense and www.icasualties.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | May 29, 2007
ANBAR PROVINCE, Iraq -- Once the most violence-racked region of Iraq, much of Anbar has become a relatively peaceful haven, ripe for the kind of economic development and political reform that has been the most noble and pressing U.S. goal for the nation it invaded four years ago. About 200 local Iraqi leaders in the dusty Euphrates River towns that stretch more than a hundred miles west of Baghdad have thrown in their lot with U.S.
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