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By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1998
Now that the dust has settled, the American Film Institute's canonization of the "greatest 100 American movies of all time" has inspired a few random observations:United Artists - This studio was responsible for the most titles on the list - 18. Formed in 1919 by Charlie Chaplin, D.W. Griffith, Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks Sr. as a refuge from the predations of exploitative studios, UA stayed true to its mission throughout economic busts and booms...
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Harvey G. Alexander, who founded and served as executive director of the Baltimore Film Festival and also read poetry on WBJC-FM, died Nov. 23 of pulmonary edema at Franklin Square Medical Center. He was 77. "I first got to know him in 1964 at Martick's. They wouldn't let me in, but I got to know him behind Martick's back in the alley," said film director and writer John Waters. "Harvey was an eccentric intellectual and a real bohemian, but always very friendly," said Mr. Waters.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
Just when you thought it was safe to stop thinking in blocks of 100, the American Film Institute (AFI) is coming out with the 100 Funniest Films of All Time. This list, of course, follows on the heels of the 100 Greatest Films of All Time (winner: "Casablanca") and the 50 Greatest Actors and 50 Greatest Actresses of All Time (winners: Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn). The results will be revealed Tuesday on "AFI's 100 Years - 100 Laughs," slated for 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Washington's WUSA, Channel 9. Baltimore's CBS affiliate, WJZ, Channel 13, will carry the Orioles game Tuesday night - even though there's been nothing funny about the O's this season - and won't air the AFI special until the following Sunday, June 18, beginning at 12:05 a.m. Drew Barrymore, whose films are unlikely to appear in the Top 100 will serve as host.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
A son of Hollywood royalty will be in Baltimore this week, lending his support in the fight against the disease that killed his father 55 years ago. Stephen Bogart, the son of acting legends Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, will be in town Oct. 24 to film a promotional spot for the Esophageal Cancer Action Network (ECAN), a three-year-old Baltimore-based non-profit promoting early detection and treatment of the disease. Humphrey Bogart, star of “Casablanca” and an Oscar-winner for “The African Queen,” died of esophageal cancer in 1957, when his son was just 8. Stephen Bogart, 63, will be taping a movie trailer and public service announcement at the MPT studios in Owings Mills.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 20, 1990
I'd be hard pressed to name a movie I enjoyed more than "Hollywood Mavericks," the American Film Institute documentary that heaves into the Charles for a couple of days on a rebel-with-a-cause double bill with "My Dinner with Abbie," about Abbie Hoffman.As a documentary the film isn't much, more an act of aggressive archivalism than filmmaking. And it's a bit shakily conceived as it searches through Hollywood history in search of "mavericks" who made movies by their own lights and not by the industry's.
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By Ann Hornaday | July 5, 1998
When the American Film Institute announced its list of the "greatest 100 American films of all time" last month, a collective cry went up: Great, but where can we see them on screen rather than video?Luckily, Baltimore has one of the country's few remaining revival houses dedicated to preserving our cinematic heritage by showing vintage films in an intimate theatrical setting. The Orpheum is running two of AFI's greatest films starting Monday: "On the Waterfront" (No. 8), Elia Kazan's brilliant 1954 drama starring Marlon Brando as a boxer battling union corruption; and Billy Wilder's incomparable "Sunset Boulevard" (No. 12)
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By Susan Baer | April 7, 1991
When a screening of "Separate But Equal" was held at the American Film Institute in Washington several weeks ago, the film's central character, NAACP counsel-turned-Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, was among the dignitaries in the audience.Although his presence alone at this event was most atypical, the 82-year-old justice, surrounded by family and friends, responded questions about the film with typical judicious restraint.A phone call to his chambers last week drew similar reticence.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 17, 1996
HOLLYWOOD -- A film that archivists believe to be the oldest complete American feature, a 1912 version of Shakespeare's "Richard III," has been been given to the American Film Institute in near-perfect condition. The print had been stored for more than 30 years in the basement of a former theater projectionist in Portland, Ore.Produced three years before D.W. Griffith's Civil War epic, "The Birth of a Nation," "Richard III" was long thought by film historians to be lost. The film, starring Frederick Warde, a popular Shakespearean actor of the day, was the second feature produced in the United States.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | August 25, 2006
Big Night, a drama starring Stanley Tucci and Tony Shalhoub as squabbling brothers resorting to desperate publicity stunts to keep their Italian restaurant afloat, is tonight's final offering in the 2006 Little Italy Open Air Film festival. Festivities at the corner of High and Stiles streets, including live music, begin at 7 p.m., with the movie starting at 9 p.m. Admission is free. Big crowds are expected, so arrive early and take a lawn chair. Information: lit tleitaly-baltimore.com.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | November 3, 2006
A series of films featuring and/or centering on hip-hop culture begins tomorrow at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. The series opens with two films: Tony Silver and Henry Chalfant's Style Wars, a 1983 documentary that looks at subway graffiti in New York, and Freshest Kids: A History of the B-boy, a 2002 documentary look by director Israel at the breakdancers (or B-boys) whose energy and visibility were key to spreading hip-hop culture. The film series, which continues Nov. 14 and 15, is part of the library's "Hip-Hop Happenings," sponsored in part by Free Fall Baltimore.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun movie critic | July 6, 2007
Porky's? Friday the 13th? If you were a decade, is that how you'd want to be remembered? Ask most people about the benchmark films of the 1980s, and that's what they'll come up with. Those, and a lot of John Hughes movies. Todd Hitchcock, 36, knows the era's cinematic landscape isn't rife with masterworks. But having come of age during that decade, he doesn't buy into the perception of the 1980s as a cinematic black hole, devoid of the boundary-pushing of the 1970s or even the big-budget grandeur of the 1990s.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | June 15, 2007
"Film Baltimore," a seven-week series of films made in and about Charm City, kicks off Thursday with that most Bawlmer of films, Barry Levinson's 1982 Diner. Steve Guttenberg, Paul Reiser, Mickey Rourke, Daniel Stern, Kevin Bacon and Timothy Daly star as a group of friends hesitant to leave the joys of adolescent camaraderie behind. Chip Silverman, one of the "diner guys" who inspired the film, will host the festival. Showtime is 8 p.m.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
Beginning this weekend, the weekly revival series at the Charles Theatre turns its attention to film noir, those bleak, shadowy movies filled with easily duped guys led astray by morally questionable gals that dominated post-war America's movie screens. First up in the 14-week series is Otto Preminger's 1944 Laura, starring Dana Andrews as a detective who falls in love with a painting of a woman who may not be as dead as everyone thinks. The cast also includes Gene Tierney, Clifton Webb, Vincent Price and Judith Anderson.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | November 3, 2006
A series of films featuring and/or centering on hip-hop culture begins tomorrow at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. The series opens with two films: Tony Silver and Henry Chalfant's Style Wars, a 1983 documentary that looks at subway graffiti in New York, and Freshest Kids: A History of the B-boy, a 2002 documentary look by director Israel at the breakdancers (or B-boys) whose energy and visibility were key to spreading hip-hop culture. The film series, which continues Nov. 14 and 15, is part of the library's "Hip-Hop Happenings," sponsored in part by Free Fall Baltimore.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | September 1, 2006
Doug Atchison's Akeelah and the Bee will be shown Thursday at the East Columbia branch of the Howard County Public Library. The film stars Keke Palmer as a middle-schooler in the Los Angeles public school system who has a gift for spelling but hesitates to show it, afraid of the razzing she'll get from classmates. Enter Dr. Larabee (Laurence Fishburne), a former English teacher who recognizes Akeelah's talent and uses a tough-love approach to try to bring it out. Also in the cast is Angela Bassett as Akeelah's mom. Akeelah is the latest in a film series showcasing titles recently released on DVD. Showtime is 7 p.m. at the library, 6600 Cradlerock Way. Admission is free.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | August 25, 2006
Big Night, a drama starring Stanley Tucci and Tony Shalhoub as squabbling brothers resorting to desperate publicity stunts to keep their Italian restaurant afloat, is tonight's final offering in the 2006 Little Italy Open Air Film festival. Festivities at the corner of High and Stiles streets, including live music, begin at 7 p.m., with the movie starting at 9 p.m. Admission is free. Big crowds are expected, so arrive early and take a lawn chair. Information: lit tleitaly-baltimore.com.
NEWS
By KEVIN SMOKLER | August 19, 1994
I magine going to the Louvre and noticing horrible changes. The Mona Lisa's smile has blurred into a muddy frown. The once brilliant colors of the Flemish masters have deteriorated to sludge.This horrifying vision is the reality of America's film history.The National Center for Film and Video Preservation (NCFVP) estimates that of the 21,000 feature films made before 1951, "only half exist today."Most of the remainder are falling victim to deterioration of their nitrate stock, the highly reactive substance base of pre-1951 film.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 9, 2005
For a city its size, Baltimore has surprisingly few operating movie theaters. There's the Charles, 1711 N. Charles St., which showcases first-run films that are unavailable elsewhere in the city. The Senator, 5904 York Road, with its state-of-the-art projection system and movie-palace ambience, remains one of the best places in the country to see a movie, any movie. (In fact, it was just named one of America's best 10 theaters by Entertainment Weekly magazine.) And the Rotunda Cinematheque, 711 W. 40th St., offers an intimate, cozy experience that is difficult to duplicate in a mega-mall.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 9, 2005
For a city its size, Baltimore has surprisingly few operating movie theaters. There's the Charles, 1711 N. Charles St., which showcases first-run films that are unavailable elsewhere in the city. The Senator, 5904 York Road, with its state-of-the-art projection system and movie-palace ambience, remains one of the best places in the country to see a movie, any movie. (In fact, it was just named one of America's best 10 theaters by Entertainment Weekly magazine.) And the Rotunda Cinematheque, 711 W. 40th St., offers an intimate, cozy experience that is difficult to duplicate in a mega-mall.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
Just when you thought it was safe to stop thinking in blocks of 100, the American Film Institute (AFI) is coming out with the 100 Funniest Films of All Time. This list, of course, follows on the heels of the 100 Greatest Films of All Time (winner: "Casablanca") and the 50 Greatest Actors and 50 Greatest Actresses of All Time (winners: Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn). The results will be revealed Tuesday on "AFI's 100 Years - 100 Laughs," slated for 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Washington's WUSA, Channel 9. Baltimore's CBS affiliate, WJZ, Channel 13, will carry the Orioles game Tuesday night - even though there's been nothing funny about the O's this season - and won't air the AFI special until the following Sunday, June 18, beginning at 12:05 a.m. Drew Barrymore, whose films are unlikely to appear in the Top 100 will serve as host.
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