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By Arthur Caplan | December 5, 1991
FEW COUNTRIES can claim politicians who expend more verbiage per minute extolling the glories of the family than ours.Attend any political rally for any candidate for any public office in any town from St. Paul to St. Petersurg, and you will find yourself adrift in a sea of warm fuzzies about the family that seem to have been lifted verbatim from old "Leave It to Beaver" scripts.George Bush is especially prone to wax eloquent over the family as the moral linchpin of American society. Why then, it is reasonable to wonder, is the man who would lay claim to being the staunchest friend the American family ever had threatening a veto of the 12-week family-leave policy recently enacted by Congress?
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 24, 2014
Ward and June. Ozzie and Harriet. Jim and Margaret Anderson. If you recognize those couples - and if you grew up wishing they were your parents - you likely hearken to a time when the American family was made up of a breadwinning father and a homemaking mother and a couple of kids. We like to think of the 1950s and the early 1960s as the golden age of family life, but it was also a repressive time for women. Only a handful had college degrees, only about 30 percent ventured outside the home to work, and women had little control over the timing and number of the children they bore.
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NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | August 18, 1991
THE JAMESES: A FAMILY NARRATIVE. R. W. B. Lewis. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 696 pages. $35. The James family, which in one generation produced two great men, the psychologist and philosopher William and the writer Henry, is perhaps America's most esteemed family of letters. Probably no other American family has chronicled itself more articulately or voluminously, or has been more studied by ++ scholars. Drawing on the wealth of materials and sources, R. W. B. Lewis -- author of a prize-winning biography of Edith Wharton -- has compiled a three-generational saga of this remarkable family, from the arrival of the founding patriarch, William, from Ireland in 1789 to the death of his grandson, Henry, in 1916.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
Representative C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger's decision not to run for governor might not have been much of a surprise for Maryland's politicians, but his older constituents, who comprise about 12 percent of his district's voters, may well have been surprised to hear that he wants to remain in Washington to continue working on tax and entitlement reform ( "Ruppersberger decides against a run for governor," Jan. 22). On Capitol Hill, "entitlement reform" is the "kinder, gentler" phrase that members of both political parties now use to describe plans to cut benefits for middle-class Americans.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 1999
ORLANDO, Fla. -- American Family Publishers, one of the nation's two largest sweepstakes promotion companies, agreed yesterday to extensive changes in its practices and a $4 million settlement of civil charges by four states that the company deceived consumers.Under the agreement, the company will stop telling recipients of its mailings that they are winners or members of a group of finalists or semifinalists unless that is true. It will also send notices to customers who buy large numbers of magazines in a year, reminding them that no purchase is necessary to enter the sweepstakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 5, 2003
Television this week begins its midseason cycle of replacement series, and if you can't handle reality programming, you might as well turn off the tube. Networks and cable channels will feature the debuts of some two dozen new reality series in the next four months -- five this week alone. Combined with series already on the air, like MTV's The Osbournes, and those returning for a second season, like NBC's Meet the Folks, it might seem like too much reality to bear. But in the mix this week with such debased notions of reality as WB's The Surreal Life -- which places faded celebrities in singer Glen Campbell's former mansion to see how strange things can get -- is a profound PBS documentary that offers desperately needed context to the whole cultural megillah that reality television has become.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 20, 2002
American Family is being touted by PBS as the first weekly drama on American broadcast television about a Latino family. That's a historic claim, and the series deserves to be celebrated for its commitment to diversity and ethnic understanding. But creator Gregory Nava (El Norte and Selena) doesn't want viewers to think the 13-week series that begins Wednesday night on public television is only by, for and about the Latino experience. "American Family is about everybody's family," Nava said at a PBS press conference in Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 26, 1997
A COVER STORY in Newsweek magazine suggests people are cheating their spouses and kids by spending too much time in the office. A new book, "The Time Bind," says work has become more homey for people than home itself, because, well, there's too much work to do at home.A University of Maryland College Park sociologist, who has long studied the use of time, says people have more free hours than ever; they simply use them up watching television.So what's ailing the American family? Perhaps too much thought and energy spent on the adoptive kin who visit our homes via TV nightly.
BUSINESS
By Steve Halpern for Knight Ridder | April 10, 1991
Safecard"Shares of Safecard (SSI, NYSE, around $7), the provider of credit-card loss notification services, fell in price recently in response to allegations that ex-chairman and current consultant Peter Halmos is the target of a criminal probe," says John Bickingham, The Prudent Speculator, of Santa Monica, Calif."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 28, 2001
LOS ANGELES - American Family, the first Latino drama in the history of broadcast television, will debut in January on PBS. The series, which was announced to the nation's television critics yesterday, also is the first original weekly drama produced by public television in decades. It stars Edward James Olmos, Sonia Braga and Raquel Welch as members of a multi-generational Latino family living in East Los Angeles. The creator and executive producer is Gregory Nava, the writer and producer of El Norte and Selena.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | November 26, 2012
President Barack Obama has several stated ambitions for his presidency. He wants it to be "transformative. " He wants to unite Americans of all parties. He wants to build an economy from the middle class out (whatever that means), and he wants to help what you might call the domestic refugees of America's economic transformation. Given the principled disagreements dividing left and right in America, it's hard to see how he can accomplish these goals when it comes to conventional economic policy.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | November 22, 2012
I view most efforts to coerce people into doing a particular thing on a particular day with suspicion. Consider Christmas. It can be great, but I'm not sure little baby Jesus would need an Xbox. And why did President Ronald Reagan make June 25 National Catfish Day? Salmon tastes so much better. It's the commercialization of commemoration, which is why I love Thanksgiving. There's no profit motive. You've got family and gluttony. That's it. And I like the nonprofit group StoryCorps' effort to wrest the day after Thanksgiving from Mammon with a National Day of Listening, an opportunity to share stories with those close to you. So, family, friends, and friends whom I have yet to meet, here's my story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
When a dozen Morgan State University students launched a theater troupe called ArtsCentric nearly a decade ago, their goal went beyond creating performance opportunities for themselves. They wanted to do work that could make a difference to people. The two goals come together this weekend with a production of the Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning musical "Next to Normal," a groundbreaking show about a woman whose battle with bipolar disorder threatens to tear apart her family.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | June 13, 2012
When President Barack Obama stopped in Baltimore yesterday he mentioned two issues likely to be far more contentious here than his own re-election: Same-sex marriage and rights for illegal immigrants. Speaking at the Hyatt Regency in Baltimore , the president made direct comments about the expected battle over Maryland's new same-sex marriage law. The law does not take effect until Jan. 2013, and opponents have gathered more than enough signatures needed to put the issue to voters in November.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
At the end of World War II in Europe, a young American soldier was reassigned from the infantry to the military police. He was issued a new uniform, told to practice saluting and ordered to guard the former German SS headquarters in Bavaria, where the U.S. Army had set up a base of operations. As he stood at his post, proudly sporting the black-and-gray patch of the 94th Division on his sleeve, Pfc. Roland "Ron" Sluder spotted a tall, broad-shouldered man in a trench coat making his way down the corridor.
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | June 11, 2008
In the worst-case scenario, soon no one will be going to the mountains or the shore, and cross country family odysseys will be fuzzy memories from a distant, Norman Rockwell past. Thanks to America's energy mess, the family vacation of the future could evolve into a stay-at-home enterprise, an interval of togetherness without endless days cooped up in station wagons and vans as Mom and Dad bicker while trying to keep Junior and Sis from pounding each other into smithereens in the back seat.
NEWS
By Jill Vejnoska | January 15, 1993
STOP snipping your toenails or sniping about the grandmother who cut in front of you in the Elvis stamp line.Whatever else you're doing, just drop it.Because if you don't, YOU (insert name here) will not have taken every advantage when it comes to entering Publishers Clearing House and American Family Publishers sweepstakes. And we know YOU (insert name here) are a finalist.The two behemoths among magazine subscription service companies, each this year is offering a $10 million grand prize to be doled out -- to YOU (insert name here)
NEWS
May 23, 1995
In contrast to the take-no-prisoners rhetoric that often characterized their past political forays, the Christian Coalition's Contract with the American Family suggests this 1.5 million member group recognizes the need for compromise on some issues.A notable instance: Rather than seeking an absolute ban on abortions, it calls only for laws restricting abortions in the last stages of pregnancy -- a move even many abortion-rights supporters may be willing to consider. As coalition chairman Ralph Reed noted before the contract was unveiled with fitting humility: "These are the Ten Suggestions.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 16, 2006
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.VA. / / Families and happiness -- the two don't always go together. That's certainly true in the plays at the 16th annual Contemporary American Theater Festival. Edginess has always been a hallmark of Shepherdstown's new-play festival, and this year, that edginess extends from a 4-year-old's fantasies to father-son rivalry. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN THEATER FESTIVAL / / Through July 30 / / Shepherd University, Shepherdstown, W. Va. / / 800-999-2283 or catf.org
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
A white Hanover teenager pleaded guilty yesterday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to committing a hate crime by scraping a profanity-laced racial epithet into a black neighbor's car - an act of vandalism that some in the African-American community said showed racial tensions in the county. Assistant State's Attorney Laura S. Kiessling said she would seek jail time for Alan Lee Davis, 19, for the damage to the car belonging to Joan and Barry Turner when Davis is sentenced Dec. 22. Davis' lawyer said he would seek probation before judgment.
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