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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | October 29, 1990
HE IS ALWAYS referred to in the textbooks, as David McCullough notes in his introduction to tonight's edition of PBS' American Experience, as "a disgruntled office seeker."His name was Charles Guiteau, and he shot President James Garfield not long after he had taken office in 1881. The fact that Guiteau could not get the job that he wanted is seen as sufficient explanation for his act.Of course, there was more to the story and "Insanity on Trial," the American Experience that will be on Maryland Public Television, Channels 22 and 67, at 9 o'clock, tells Guiteau's oddly twisted tale and how it became intertwined with America's history.
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By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
From Rep. Elijah E. Cummings playing a leading role in televised hearings on American deaths in Benghazi, to the Game Show Network visiting a Baltimore church to play matchmaker for a member of the congregation, there is going to be a distinct local flavor to summertime TV this year. Here are 10 shows, stories and trends to look for in and on Baltimore television in coming weeks - for better or worse. “It Takes a Church” debuts at 9 p.m. Thursday on GSN. The reality-TV series hosted by gospel singer Natalie Grant visits a different church each week and, with the help of the pastor and congregation members, plays the dating game.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 16, 2000
Christianity and capitalism working hand in hand to shape the face of 19th and 20th century America. That's the story of the Rockefeller family that "American Experience" tells this week as it launches its 13th season with "The Rockefellers," a two-night, four-hour film on the dynasty that Standard Oil built. While the documentary pulls some fairly serious punches (it makes no mention of the anti-Semitism of John D. Rockefeller Sr.), this is a great American saga. The filmmakers are keenly in touch with the larger patterns of American history and the ways in which this prominent family both shaped and reacted to its ebb and flow.
NEWS
June 30, 2013
The private ownership of property is embedded throughout the Constitution and is a foundational aspect of the American experience ("High court bolsters property owners' rights" June 26). Justice Elena Kagan's strongly worded dissent that state and local government land-use decisions would be subjected to heightened constitutional scrutiny reflects her apparently limited understanding - or more likely - socialist-leaning personal philosophy regarding the Constitution and the reasons the country was founded, one of which was individual property rights.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | December 9, 1992
WHY only America?Why is America, and America alone, the country that is expected to send thousands of troops to Somalia, supply food for the starving and now even put shattered Humpty-Dumpty states back together again?As we daringly dispatch 20,000 troops to Somalia this week, I hear more and more Americans asking these questions -- and they are fair and just ones. For, at this very moment, two U.S. strike forces composed of 1,800 U.S. Marines are landing in the starving, disintegrating African nation.
FEATURES
October 6, 1997
The biographical documentary of President Harry S. Truman concludes tonight on PBS, on "The American Experience" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67).Afterward, "The Great Upset of '48" (10 p.m.-11 p.m.) tells of his 1948 election, one of the greatest political upsets in American history.Pub Date: 10/06/97
NEWS
June 30, 2013
The private ownership of property is embedded throughout the Constitution and is a foundational aspect of the American experience ("High court bolsters property owners' rights" June 26). Justice Elena Kagan's strongly worded dissent that state and local government land-use decisions would be subjected to heightened constitutional scrutiny reflects her apparently limited understanding - or more likely - socialist-leaning personal philosophy regarding the Constitution and the reasons the country was founded, one of which was individual property rights.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 6, 1994
Tonight's most compelling program, on an otherwise uneventful evening, is an episode of the PBS series "The American Experience," examining America's slow reaction to Nazi atrocities during World War II.* "The Nanny" (8-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Guest star Rita Moreno is a bossy gym instructor whose career has spanned two generations: first Fran's, and now Maggie's. Fran Drescher stars. CBS.* "Beverly Hills, 90210" (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Donna and Kelly (Tori Spelling, Jennie Garth)
NEWS
August 29, 2005
A screening and discussion of the film The Murder of Emmett Till is set for 6:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Enoch Pratt Central Library, 400 Cathedral St. The free presentation - sponsored by the library and the Baltimore Community Relations Commission - marks the 40th anniversary of Till's death. The 14-year-old boy had traveled from Chicago to Mississippi to visit relatives in August 1955, and was beaten and killed, allegedly by two white men, after he purportedly whistled at a white woman.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 23, 1998
In biography, you almost always pay a price for access. We've become suspicious of books bearing the "authorized" label. We wonder what concessions were made by the author to gain entry and how those concessions affected his story."
NEWS
By Childs Walker | childs.walker@baltsun.com | February 21, 2010
Ahmed's hands trembled as he stepped to the microphone. Despite the horror and tumult that had visited his home city of Baghdad, he had never been the sort of boy to confront politicians. But before him stood one of the chief advisers to the U.S. president who had abruptly halted the calm routines of Ahmed's youth with bombs and tanks. Ahmed could not live with himself if he remained silent. If Saddam Hussein paid for vicious crimes with his life, Ahmed asked Karl Rove, what should the punishment be for the invaders who cost millions of Iraqis their lives, their homes, their health and their security?
NEWS
By Quincy Jones | January 19, 2009
Like many Americans and citizens of the world, on the morning of Nov. 5, I awoke with a renewed sense of purpose. Having witnessed, the night before, an event that I never imagined contemplating, the election of an African-American to the office of president of the United States of America, I felt truly vindicated in the belief that if you live long enough, anything is possible. The night before, as I sat with family and friends watching the election results come in, I resigned myself to tempering my emotions.
NEWS
By JAMES J. ZOGBY | October 19, 2005
WASHINGTON -- There are important differences between the Arab and broader Muslim immigrant experience in Europe and that of the Arab-American and American Muslim communities in the United States. First, America itself is different, both in concept and in reality. I have heard third-generation Kurds in Germany or Algerians in France complain that they remain on the margins of their societies. With difficulty, they may obtain citizenship, but not the identity of being German or French.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
A screening and discussion of the film The Murder of Emmett Till is set for 6:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Enoch Pratt Central Library, 400 Cathedral St. The free presentation - sponsored by the library and the Baltimore Community Relations Commission - marks the 40th anniversary of Till's death. The 14-year-old boy had traveled from Chicago to Mississippi to visit relatives in August 1955, and was beaten and killed, allegedly by two white men, after he purportedly whistled at a white woman.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 8, 2005
It is far from entertaining for the people living it, but the Iraq war is becoming a staple of prime-time entertainment television. During Sunday's Super Bowl, the Iraq conflict was the unstated theme of a wordless Anheuser-Busch spot featuring American troops in desert gear walking through an airport - and receiving a standing ovation from civilians. In recent weeks, prime-time TV has featured wounded veterans getting home makeovers (A&E's At Home With the Brave), professional wrestlers taking their show to Iraq (UPN's WWE Smackdown!
FEATURES
By Robin Pogrebin and Robin Pogrebin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 31, 2005
Adriana Bosch remembers asking her father to take her to the Santiago airport in Cuba when she was 4 years old so that she could see Fidel Castro get off the plane from Havana after the Cuban Revolution. She stood at the foot of the stairs, and when Castro descended, he picked her up and kissed her for the cameras. Bosch left Cuba a decade later. Her father, who worked in the cattle business, had lost all his property. Several family friends had wound up in jail. Now, at 49, after years of working on documentary films about the likes of Ulysses S. Grant, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, Bosch has turned her attentions toward home.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | May 25, 1994
Soap opera takes center stage tonight, as ABC presents the "Daytime Emmy Awards" and Fox devotes two hours to the season finale of "Beverly Hills, 90210." Not to be overlooked, though, is tonight's "American Experience," which gets a jump on the documentary competition by presenting its "D-Day" special well in advance of the event's actual 50th anniversary on June 6.* "Home Improvement" (8-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Once again, Tim (Tim Allen) closes out a season by challenging guest star Bob Vila to a mano a mano duel -- this time in hot rods.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney | July 19, 1991
METROPOLITANRCA/Columbia Pictures Home Video$89.95.It is perhaps hard to imagine that a film that concerns itself mostly with the somewhat aimless wanderings of a group of New York upper-class kids during the Christmas party season could be extremely inventive and very entertaining, but "Metropolitan" is both.Writer/director Whit Stillman spent years writing the witty, literate script, raising the minuscule budget and getting crew and cast (all unknowns) together. It was worth the effort; "Metropolitan" is a gem.It is an examination of a class and of a lifestyle that is slowly sinking beneath the surface of the American Experience in the egalitarian '90s.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2004
SPOTSYLVANIA, Va. - It's a brisk fall morning, the sun battling to break its way through leaden clouds, as the man in the wraparound shades pops out of a thicket of trees. Thirty-five people trail in James McPherson's wake as he ambles down a brush-covered hillside toward a clearing below, but he casts nary a glance to the rear. The general's job is to keep his eyes on the battlefield, you see, to keep looking ahead. The troops just have to keep pace. Like any good leader, McPherson has canvassed his terrain before.
TRAVEL
BY STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and BY STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2002
"Flood's over!" That's the hook for Johnstown's current campaign to lure visitors to the site of the notorious disaster that struck the town more than a century ago. It's a reassuring motto, but not an entirely accurate one. After torrential rain, the neglected South Fork dam burst on May 31, 1889, unleashing a crushing wall of water that claimed 2,209 lives and leveled the bustling Conemaugh Valley steel town, tucked deep within southwestern Pennsylvania's Alle-...
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