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NEWS
January 26, 2013
  What's next, an attack on a Sunday School class?  Quick, put armed guards in all the churches! What about malls?  Do we want armed guards at every entrance?  Is this how we want to live?   Americans are fond of saying our country is exceptional.  It's true: Twenty times more people are shot to death here than in any other country.  Ninety percent of children killed by gunfire are Americans.  Often they are doing something as innocent as going to school or watching the fireworks on New Years Eve.  About 30 people die from gunshots every day.  Is this how we want to be exceptional?
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 31, 2014
Sometimes you read a sentence and you think to yourself: only here, only us. Here's one such sentence. "A 9-year-old girl from New Jersey accidentally shot and killed her instructor with an Uzi submachine gun while he stood to her left side, trying to guide her. " That's from a New York Times account of the death of 39-year-old Charles Vacca, who worked for the Last Stop shooting range in White Hills, Ariz. He died Monday when his...
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 31, 2014
Sometimes you read a sentence and you think to yourself: only here, only us. Here's one such sentence. "A 9-year-old girl from New Jersey accidentally shot and killed her instructor with an Uzi submachine gun while he stood to her left side, trying to guide her. " That's from a New York Times account of the death of 39-year-old Charles Vacca, who worked for the Last Stop shooting range in White Hills, Ariz. He died Monday when his...
NEWS
January 30, 2014
I appreciated Dan Rodricks recent column about American "exceptionalism" ( "Expecting the horrible is the American way," Jan. 25). Some years ago when I conducted student travel-study semesters in various European countries with, among other things, well-functioning transportation systems, my students had no problem recognizing that some things were indeed better in Europe. After our return I asked them about this, and their answer was: "The U.S. is still the best country.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | October 10, 2005
ATLANTA -- It sounds like the plot of countless plague movies, but it is, instead, an unsettling reality: In a laboratory at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, scientists have reconstituted the influenza strain that killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide in 1918. They hope study of the virus will help them avert another deadly pandemic. Perhaps they can. Perhaps our faith in science and technology will pay off once again as researchers find ways to fend off disaster.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown stepped into the role of surrogate for President Obama Monday as he joined in a conference call to denounce former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's record on veterans' issues, the federal budget and the GOP presidential candidate's charge this weekend that Obama doesn't believe in "American exceptionalism. " Brown, a veteran of the Iraq war, charged that Romney was "out of touch with reality" and "went over the line" with his criticism of Obama. The lieutenant governor pointed to Obama's debut on the national stage in 2004 as a speech that was all about American exceptionalism.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
In recent days there has been much talk of the presidential debates. We are preoccupied with relatively trivial perceptions of who "won" or "lost. " There has also been endless discussion of whose policy proposals are better. Rather than entertain these meaningless debates, however, we would do better to look at our track record as a nation in comparison to other nations. I bring this up because in 2008 too many of us were blinded by "American exceptionalism" to realize that the recession that we suffered was global in its reach and not isolated to the U.S. All of the research has already been done for us, via the CIA World Fact Book.
NEWS
April 18, 2007
By the desensitizing standards of routine American gun violence, the shootings at Virginia Tech University were shocking only in their scale. Over more than 20 years, Americans have got grimly used to a ritual that plays out on the cable news every few months. The initial news is sketchy, reports of shots fired at a campus or in a schoolyard. Then, the first confused images of students running terrified from classrooms, black-clothed SWAT teams gingerly pressing into doorways; the press conference in which some dazed school principal or university president mutters the first incomplete details, with casualty estimates and emergency phone numbers for worried relatives to call.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | February 7, 1991
There is a striking passage in Thomas Jefferson's message to Congress of 1803, during the pause between the French revolutionary wars and those, to follow shortly, of Napoleon's Empire. He said, ''Let us bow with gratitude to that kind Providence which . . . guarded us from hastily entering into the sanguinary contest, and left us only to look on and to pity its ravages.''He went on to say that ''we should be most unwise, indeed, were we to cast away the singular blessings of the position in which nature has placed us, the opportunity she has endowed us with of pursuing, at a distance from foreign contentions, the paths of industry, peace and happiness; of cultivating general friendship, and of bringing collisions of interest to the umpirage (sic)
FEATURES
By Michael Kenney and Michael Kenney,Boston Globe | March 17, 1994
In October 1947, Ronald Reagan testified at the House Un-American Activities Committee hearings on communist influence in Hollywood. He "created something of a stir," according to a report in Motion Picture Daily, with his "affirmation of . . . American democracy, in and out of Hollywood."But, writes University of Wisconsin communications professor Stephen Vaughn in his absorbing -- but unsettling -- study of Mr. Reagan as actor-politician, Mr. Reagan was an informer for the FBI, complete with a code name, "T-10."
NEWS
December 3, 2013
A report this week that American students are lagging behind their top international peers in math, reading and science should give pause to those who argue that the nation's school reform efforts are going too far and too fast. In fact, they suggest just the opposite: The, at best, middling scores of American 15-year-olds not only challenge the notion of American "exceptionalism," they also threaten over time to erode the educational foundations of the world's largest economy and its global political and military influence.
NEWS
January 26, 2013
  What's next, an attack on a Sunday School class?  Quick, put armed guards in all the churches! What about malls?  Do we want armed guards at every entrance?  Is this how we want to live?   Americans are fond of saying our country is exceptional.  It's true: Twenty times more people are shot to death here than in any other country.  Ninety percent of children killed by gunfire are Americans.  Often they are doing something as innocent as going to school or watching the fireworks on New Years Eve.  About 30 people die from gunshots every day.  Is this how we want to be exceptional?
NEWS
October 11, 2012
In recent days there has been much talk of the presidential debates. We are preoccupied with relatively trivial perceptions of who "won" or "lost. " There has also been endless discussion of whose policy proposals are better. Rather than entertain these meaningless debates, however, we would do better to look at our track record as a nation in comparison to other nations. I bring this up because in 2008 too many of us were blinded by "American exceptionalism" to realize that the recession that we suffered was global in its reach and not isolated to the U.S. All of the research has already been done for us, via the CIA World Fact Book.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown stepped into the role of surrogate for President Obama Monday as he joined in a conference call to denounce former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's record on veterans' issues, the federal budget and the GOP presidential candidate's charge this weekend that Obama doesn't believe in "American exceptionalism. " Brown, a veteran of the Iraq war, charged that Romney was "out of touch with reality" and "went over the line" with his criticism of Obama. The lieutenant governor pointed to Obama's debut on the national stage in 2004 as a speech that was all about American exceptionalism.
NEWS
May 8, 2011
One of the things that really bugged us about Osama bin Laden was his brilliance as a military strategist. He challenged Americans' sacrosanct self-image of invincibility as measured in military might. In doing so, he forced us to question our sense of God-given exceptionalism and superiority as a nation. This could not stand. It explains the triumphant chest-thumping in response to his killing, something that goes well beyond satisfaction from knowing that the perpetrator of vast crimes has been laid low.   John G. Bailey, Edgemere
NEWS
April 18, 2007
By the desensitizing standards of routine American gun violence, the shootings at Virginia Tech University were shocking only in their scale. Over more than 20 years, Americans have got grimly used to a ritual that plays out on the cable news every few months. The initial news is sketchy, reports of shots fired at a campus or in a schoolyard. Then, the first confused images of students running terrified from classrooms, black-clothed SWAT teams gingerly pressing into doorways; the press conference in which some dazed school principal or university president mutters the first incomplete details, with casualty estimates and emergency phone numbers for worried relatives to call.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | January 11, 2005
NORWAY'S JAN Egeland started it with his remark that America is stingy, or words to that effect, focusing on the early U.S. response to Southeast Asia's tsunami victims. Since then, competitive caring has taken off around the globe as nations vie to display and measure their greater virtue. There are surely worse things to get in a heat about. Who gives more? Who cares more? Who among men, which among nations, is most charitable? Dollar by dollar, Americans are having to match their worldly weight in gold.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | March 28, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Are Americans different? The question has been asked by scholars and writers at least since Alexis de Tocqueville wrote "Democracy in America" in the 1830s. His answer was, "Yes, they are" -- and he became the father to regularly emerging theories of American "exceptionalism." The American, de Tocqueville thought, was exceptional because he lacked a feudal past, was more socially egalitarian, more meritocratic, more individualistic, more rights-oriented and more religious.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | October 10, 2005
ATLANTA -- It sounds like the plot of countless plague movies, but it is, instead, an unsettling reality: In a laboratory at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, scientists have reconstituted the influenza strain that killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide in 1918. They hope study of the virus will help them avert another deadly pandemic. Perhaps they can. Perhaps our faith in science and technology will pay off once again as researchers find ways to fend off disaster.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | January 11, 2005
NORWAY'S JAN Egeland started it with his remark that America is stingy, or words to that effect, focusing on the early U.S. response to Southeast Asia's tsunami victims. Since then, competitive caring has taken off around the globe as nations vie to display and measure their greater virtue. There are surely worse things to get in a heat about. Who gives more? Who cares more? Who among men, which among nations, is most charitable? Dollar by dollar, Americans are having to match their worldly weight in gold.
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