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By Jules Witcover | December 10, 2012
In a profession like politics and in a town like the nation's capital, the phenomenon of a U.S. senator voluntarily surrendering his seat for a think-tank job would have been unthinkable some years ago. The decision of Republican Jim DeMint of South Carolina, founder of the Senate Tea Party Caucus and darling of true-believing ultraconservatives, to chuck his Senate seat during his second six-year term is a measure of the growing influence of...
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NEWS
May 29, 2013
As is often his wont, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s recent column on Obamacare provided a very one-sided narrative using gross generalizations and failing to provide context for his arguments ("Lost jobs, higher costs: Obamacare hits home," May 26). Mr. Ehrlich notes that landmark legislation typically passes Congress with some degree of bipartisan support. However, the examples he provides were all approved more than 48 years ago, at a time when many elected officials strove to do what was best for their constituents and the country.
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NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | April 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Charles Murray, who is the sort of big-thinking, think-tank scholar that Washington's power elite listens to, has a new plan to reduce poverty, encourage work, fortify marriages, insure the uninsured, "replace the welfare state" and save money in the long run. Unfortunately, his elegantly crafted and richly researched proposal, published by the conservative American Enterprise Institute as In Our Hands: A Plan to Replace the Welfare State,...
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 3, 2013
The government in Britain recently did something interesting. It asked everyone receiving an "incapacity benefit" -- a disability program slowly being phased out under new reforms -- to submit to a medical test to confirm they were too disabled to work. A third of recipients (878,000 people) didn't even bother and dropped out of the program rather than be examined. Of those tested, more than half (55 percent) were found fit for work, and a quarter were found fit for some work. But that's Britain, where there's a long tradition of gaming the dole.
NEWS
By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
Three days after Washington announced plans to award $2.5 billion this year in homeland security grants, the city council of a suburban Alabama city voted to create its own Department of Homeland Security and Immigration. It didn't matter that some residents and a council member, Mike Natter, argued that Hoover (population 65,000) was under no threat from terrorism. Newly elected Hoover Mayor Tony Petelos, a former Republican state lawmaker, expects his new office to be like like flypaper for homeland security grants.
NEWS
May 29, 2013
As is often his wont, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s recent column on Obamacare provided a very one-sided narrative using gross generalizations and failing to provide context for his arguments ("Lost jobs, higher costs: Obamacare hits home," May 26). Mr. Ehrlich notes that landmark legislation typically passes Congress with some degree of bipartisan support. However, the examples he provides were all approved more than 48 years ago, at a time when many elected officials strove to do what was best for their constituents and the country.
NEWS
By Edward J. Pinto | December 31, 2012
Imagine that a federal agency wanted to hurt America's working-class families on purpose. How would it inflict maximum damage? It might start by aggressively marketing homeownership to marginal borrowers. It would tell them that bad credit scores aren't a problem. It would push them into homes they can't afford, saddle them with loans that barely build equity and provide no incentives for fiscal discipline. And when many of these homes go underwater and into foreclosure, it would leave families in financial ruin.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | March 11, 2003
CHICAGO - The rest of the world may be opposed to a U.S. attack on Iraq, but here in America, there is general agreement that we are right and everybody else on Earth is wrong. American public opinion was in favor of taking out Saddam Hussein after the Sept. 11 attacks, and it still is. Who cares if this war, which we intend to fight for the good of humanity, doesn't appeal to most of humanity? Polls suggest that a large majority of Americans endorses the Bush administration's drive toward war. Why do Americans take such a different view from Europeans and other pesky foreigners?
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 8, 2013
In the Republican Party's developing effort to put on a new face after November's presidential defeat, the latest gesture is trotting out freshman Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida to deliver the GOP response to President Barack Obama's State of the Union address before Congress next week. The 41-year-old Rubio, the American-born son of naturalized Cuban-American parents, will deliver his speech in English and Spanish -- in case anyone might miss the political significance in a country with a rapidly surging Hispanic population that gave 73 percent of its votes to Mr. Obama.
NEWS
By Robert Yentzer | January 28, 2013
When it comes to fixing America's ballooning debt problem, there is one policy option that both Democrats and Republicans should be rushing to embrace. It is the proposal to replace the current Consumer Price Index (CPI) with a more accurate measure of price inflation: the Chained-CPI. If this index were used to calculate cost of living increases in Social Security benefits, income tax brackets and the like, the government could realize significant savings. The current CPI's exaggerated estimates of inflation are a wasteful leak in the fiscal pipeline.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 8, 2013
In the Republican Party's developing effort to put on a new face after November's presidential defeat, the latest gesture is trotting out freshman Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida to deliver the GOP response to President Barack Obama's State of the Union address before Congress next week. The 41-year-old Rubio, the American-born son of naturalized Cuban-American parents, will deliver his speech in English and Spanish -- in case anyone might miss the political significance in a country with a rapidly surging Hispanic population that gave 73 percent of its votes to Mr. Obama.
NEWS
By Robert Yentzer | January 28, 2013
When it comes to fixing America's ballooning debt problem, there is one policy option that both Democrats and Republicans should be rushing to embrace. It is the proposal to replace the current Consumer Price Index (CPI) with a more accurate measure of price inflation: the Chained-CPI. If this index were used to calculate cost of living increases in Social Security benefits, income tax brackets and the like, the government could realize significant savings. The current CPI's exaggerated estimates of inflation are a wasteful leak in the fiscal pipeline.
NEWS
By Edward J. Pinto | December 31, 2012
Imagine that a federal agency wanted to hurt America's working-class families on purpose. How would it inflict maximum damage? It might start by aggressively marketing homeownership to marginal borrowers. It would tell them that bad credit scores aren't a problem. It would push them into homes they can't afford, saddle them with loans that barely build equity and provide no incentives for fiscal discipline. And when many of these homes go underwater and into foreclosure, it would leave families in financial ruin.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 10, 2012
In a profession like politics and in a town like the nation's capital, the phenomenon of a U.S. senator voluntarily surrendering his seat for a think-tank job would have been unthinkable some years ago. The decision of Republican Jim DeMint of South Carolina, founder of the Senate Tea Party Caucus and darling of true-believing ultraconservatives, to chuck his Senate seat during his second six-year term is a measure of the growing influence of...
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Leslie Wilson's work as a behind-the-scenes bureaucrat may involve statistical analysis and minutiae that would put most of the world to sleep, but she has suddenly become one of the most powerful people in the Maryland State Department of Education, sometimes more sought-after than her boss, Nancy S. Grasmick. Wilson is the assistant state superintendent for assessment, a lively woman who keeps track of student test scores and is now a magnet for contractors seeking work in a tough economy.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | April 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Charles Murray, who is the sort of big-thinking, think-tank scholar that Washington's power elite listens to, has a new plan to reduce poverty, encourage work, fortify marriages, insure the uninsured, "replace the welfare state" and save money in the long run. Unfortunately, his elegantly crafted and richly researched proposal, published by the conservative American Enterprise Institute as In Our Hands: A Plan to Replace the Welfare State,...
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 3, 2013
The government in Britain recently did something interesting. It asked everyone receiving an "incapacity benefit" -- a disability program slowly being phased out under new reforms -- to submit to a medical test to confirm they were too disabled to work. A third of recipients (878,000 people) didn't even bother and dropped out of the program rather than be examined. Of those tested, more than half (55 percent) were found fit for work, and a quarter were found fit for some work. But that's Britain, where there's a long tradition of gaming the dole.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Leslie Wilson's work as a behind-the-scenes bureaucrat may involve statistical analysis and minutiae that would put most of the world to sleep, but she has suddenly become one of the most powerful people in the Maryland State Department of Education, sometimes more sought-after than her boss, Nancy S. Grasmick. Wilson is the assistant state superintendent for assessment, a lively woman who keeps track of student test scores and is now a magnet for contractors seeking work in a tough economy.
NEWS
By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
Three days after Washington announced plans to award $2.5 billion this year in homeland security grants, the city council of a suburban Alabama city voted to create its own Department of Homeland Security and Immigration. It didn't matter that some residents and a council member, Mike Natter, argued that Hoover (population 65,000) was under no threat from terrorism. Newly elected Hoover Mayor Tony Petelos, a former Republican state lawmaker, expects his new office to be like like flypaper for homeland security grants.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | March 11, 2003
CHICAGO - The rest of the world may be opposed to a U.S. attack on Iraq, but here in America, there is general agreement that we are right and everybody else on Earth is wrong. American public opinion was in favor of taking out Saddam Hussein after the Sept. 11 attacks, and it still is. Who cares if this war, which we intend to fight for the good of humanity, doesn't appeal to most of humanity? Polls suggest that a large majority of Americans endorses the Bush administration's drive toward war. Why do Americans take such a different view from Europeans and other pesky foreigners?
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