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By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 7, 2000
MOSCOW - The first time around, the new American Embassy building here was like a giant Soviet antenna, a monument to the ingenuity of the KGB and a constant and embarrassing reminder to the United States of a skirmish lost in the hard-fought Cold War. Yesterday, U.S. Ambassador James Collins welcomed reporters to the second version of the building, finally open and operating 15 years after the first attempt had to be abandoned. "It's a symbol," Collins said. "We are entering a new era in our relations with the Russian Federation.
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NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
NAIROBI, Kenya -- The last thing Richard Wamarite saw with two eyes was a truck moving Aug. 7, 1998, toward the American Embassy here in the Kenyan capital. Then an explosion rocked the intersection where the bus he was riding happened to be, and dusk fell over his world. To many Americans, the embassy attacks here and in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, have become footnotes in a larger war against terrorism. But in Nairobi, the grassy memorial park created on the site of the ruined embassy is a constant reminder of the blast that killed more than 200 people and injured more than 4,000 - and that remains the source of protests against the United States.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 11, 2002
A funny thing happened to a new Fox drama called Emma Brody on the way to its premiere tonight. It was retitled The American Embassy, and became a red, white and blue series as much about America's place in the world as it was the coming-of-age story of a young embassy worker in London named Emma Brody (Arija Bareikis). The thing that happened was Sept. 11. And so, six months after the terrorist attacks, Fox premieres The American Embassy tonight at 9 in Ally McBeal's old spot. Any and all similarities to the earlier workplace-centered drama featuring a young, single, attractive, professional woman trying to find herself are purely intentional.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 31, 2004
MOSCOW - Suicide bombers struck the U.S. and Israeli embassies in Uzbekistan yesterday, killing two local guards and injuring at least nine others in the second wave of attacks this year against a key U.S. ally during the war in Afghanistan. The prosecutor general's office also was hit in the coordinated afternoon attacks in the capital city of Tashkent. It sustained more damage than either of the embassies, where guards prevented bombers from entering the buildings. The attacks came as 15 Muslim militants linked to al-Qaida went on trial for a series of bombings in March that killed 47 people.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 31, 2004
MOSCOW - Suicide bombers struck the U.S. and Israeli embassies in Uzbekistan yesterday, killing two local guards and injuring at least nine others in the second wave of attacks this year against a key U.S. ally during the war in Afghanistan. The prosecutor general's office also was hit in the coordinated afternoon attacks in the capital city of Tashkent. It sustained more damage than either of the embassies, where guards prevented bombers from entering the buildings. The attacks came as 15 Muslim militants linked to al-Qaida went on trial for a series of bombings in March that killed 47 people.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 23, 2003
ISTANBUL, Turkey - If we ever run out of room to store our gold in Fort Knox, I know just the place to put it: the new U.S. Consulate in Istanbul. It looks just like Fort Knox - without the charm. The U.S. Consulate used to be in the heart of the city, where it was easy for Turks to pop in for a visa or to use the library. For security reasons, though, it was recently moved 45 minutes away to the outskirts of Istanbul, on a bluff overlooking the Bosporus - surrounded by a tall wall. The new consulate looks like a maximum-security prison.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
NAIROBI, Kenya -- The last thing Richard Wamarite saw with two eyes was a truck moving Aug. 7, 1998, toward the American Embassy here in the Kenyan capital. Then an explosion rocked the intersection where the bus he was riding happened to be, and dusk fell over his world. To many Americans, the embassy attacks here and in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, have become footnotes in a larger war against terrorism. But in Nairobi, the grassy memorial park created on the site of the ruined embassy is a constant reminder of the blast that killed more than 200 people and injured more than 4,000 - and that remains the source of protests against the United States.
NEWS
April 27, 2009
FREDERICK GULDEN, 86 'Last American in Vietnam' Frederick Gulden, an architect who was dubbed "the last American in Vietnam" when he was stranded in the country for 15 months after the U.S. military withdrew at the close of the Vietnam War, died of complications from esophageal cancer April 4. Mr. Gulden had established a Saigon office for the architectural firm DeLeuw Cather International in 1972. In 1975, when he got word that the South Vietnamese government's collapse was imminent, he tried to evacuate the firm's Vietnamese employees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Woestendiek and By John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2002
It was in ancient Egyptian times -- this being a complete history, we must begin there -- that man first took inky reed to papyrus and, not long thereafter, made his first disposable mistake: a hieroglyphic boo-boo of such embarrassing proportions he felt the need to rip it up in pieces so small nobody could see. While man had always had an irresistible urge to express himself, he had mostly done so, up until the invention of papyrus in 4000 B.C., on...
BUSINESS
By David E. Sanger and David E. Sanger,New York Times News Service | March 15, 1991
TOKYO -- Japanese government officials this week invited the leading computer companies in the United States and Europe, along with the top research universities on both sides of the Atlantic, to join in a 10-year project to develop advanced computers for the next century.For reasons that appear equally rooted in trade politics and Japan's own technological gaps, Tokyo is going to great lengths to draw American and European researchers into the project.The invitation, extended during an international conference, seems open to all comers, though clearly Japan will direct its pitch to leading companies, which would have the required resources.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 23, 2003
ISTANBUL, Turkey - If we ever run out of room to store our gold in Fort Knox, I know just the place to put it: the new U.S. Consulate in Istanbul. It looks just like Fort Knox - without the charm. The U.S. Consulate used to be in the heart of the city, where it was easy for Turks to pop in for a visa or to use the library. For security reasons, though, it was recently moved 45 minutes away to the outskirts of Istanbul, on a bluff overlooking the Bosporus - surrounded by a tall wall. The new consulate looks like a maximum-security prison.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 11, 2002
A funny thing happened to a new Fox drama called Emma Brody on the way to its premiere tonight. It was retitled The American Embassy, and became a red, white and blue series as much about America's place in the world as it was the coming-of-age story of a young embassy worker in London named Emma Brody (Arija Bareikis). The thing that happened was Sept. 11. And so, six months after the terrorist attacks, Fox premieres The American Embassy tonight at 9 in Ally McBeal's old spot. Any and all similarities to the earlier workplace-centered drama featuring a young, single, attractive, professional woman trying to find herself are purely intentional.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 7, 2000
MOSCOW - The first time around, the new American Embassy building here was like a giant Soviet antenna, a monument to the ingenuity of the KGB and a constant and embarrassing reminder to the United States of a skirmish lost in the hard-fought Cold War. Yesterday, U.S. Ambassador James Collins welcomed reporters to the second version of the building, finally open and operating 15 years after the first attempt had to be abandoned. "It's a symbol," Collins said. "We are entering a new era in our relations with the Russian Federation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 4, 2003
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Indonesian police have arrested one of the most hunted terrorist suspects in Southeast Asia, Mas Selamat bin Kastari, who is accused of having been involved in plots to attack U.S. facilities in the region. Kastari was arrested Sunday, on the Indonesian island of Bintang, just off Singapore, the Indonesian police announced yesterday. Singaporean authorities have said that Kastari is the leader of the Singaporean cell of Jemaah Islamiyah, the radical Islamic group based in Indonesia.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 23, 1991
AMMAN, Jordan -- Chanting "Go away, U.S.A." and waving Iraqi flags, a noisy but orderly crowd of about 200 women staged an anti-war demonstration in front of the American Embassy here yesterday.Machine gun-toting Jordanian security police stationed at the embassy gate called in reinforcements as the midday rally picked up steam. The biggest disturbance was the occasional blocking of traffic.One sign summed up the crowd's sentiment, saying, "If you cared that much about Kuwait, why didn't you care about Palestine?"
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