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NEWS
June 2, 2011
The Maryland Dream Act should not be a partisan issue. It would enable children of illegal immigrants who are eligible for higher education to receive discounted in-state tuition provided that they, or their parents, have paid a considerable amount of taxes for the last three years. For me, it is a humanitarian issue. I volunteer at an elementary school in the Baltimore area which has an immigrant student population of around 40 percent. That someone would deny the opportunity of higher education to any of these children because their parents' misdeeds years ago (now substantially corrected by their current taxpaying, law-abiding status)
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Continuing to emerge as a major entertainment presence in Annapolis, Compass Rose Theater has opened its fourth season with Lorraine Hansberry's powerful 1959 drama, "A Raisin in the Sun," visiting issues of justice and equal opportunity that continue to resonate with audiences today. Groundbreaking 55 years ago as the first Broadway play written by a black female author, "A Raisin in the Sun" not only changed American theater, but offered hope for a future when the dreams of African-American families would no longer be deferred.
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NEWS
By Peggy Rowe | July 4, 2011
The two seemingly unrelated events took place only a day apart. On the 19th of June, a 22-year-old Northern Irishman waved his putter in triumph on the 18th green of the Congressional Country Club in Bethesda. A day later, at the Park Shore Centre Government Building in Charleston, S.C., a petite, 41-year-old Thai immigrant waved her small American flag and held up her Certificate of Citizenship. The golfer's victory was shared by a gallery of thousands. Millions watched worldwide as the young man broke records and told the press he had realized the dream of his short lifetime.
NEWS
By Kaitlin Thomas | September 18, 2014
It sounds great on the surface that there would actually be a place in the world where opportunity and money abound, knowing no imaginable limits. Almost as though a new life, full of the freedoms, finances and prospects, is ripe for the picking from the American Dream tree. Such is the too-good-to-be-true nature of this centuries old image that has charmed foreigners to uproot their lives, families and futures to cross a border into an immense unknown: the glistening USA. But, as they say, all that glitters is not gold - something to keep in mind when considering crossing an arbitrary line in the hopes it could change one's life so radically and, more importantly, effortlessly.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | August 23, 2012
It's been said it takes a village to raise a child, but in this scenario, it takes a community to build a home. For the past seven years, Habitat for HumanitySusquehanna and Harford Technical High School, a vocational school in Bel Air, have partnered to build homes for those in need. This summer, the students were able to give back to one of their own and help an alumna achieve the American dream of homeownership. “It's really nice,” says the new homeowner, Kimberly Johnson of Aberdeen.
NEWS
By Jacqueline Scott | May 16, 2013
Last weekend, the film "The Great Gatsby" was reported to have earned a whopping $51 million, according to Business Insider. Just prior to its release, however, many critics ripped the film for distorting the classic novel on which it is based with over-the-top production, including 3-D images and a modern soundtrack produced by Jay-Z. This is the third time that one of the most well-known flawed heroes of 20th century fiction has had his story told on the big screen. But unlike its B-movie 1949 adaptation or drab 1974 version starring Robert Redford, this film explodes with excess - just as Jay Gatsby had intended with his mansion parties on the West Egg. It also gives audiences yet another chance to analyze the one-time Bolton Hill resident F. Scott Fitzgerald's version of the Great American Novel, this time as told through the lens of director Baz Luhrmann.
NEWS
By Kaitlin Thomas | September 18, 2014
It sounds great on the surface that there would actually be a place in the world where opportunity and money abound, knowing no imaginable limits. Almost as though a new life, full of the freedoms, finances and prospects, is ripe for the picking from the American Dream tree. Such is the too-good-to-be-true nature of this centuries old image that has charmed foreigners to uproot their lives, families and futures to cross a border into an immense unknown: the glistening USA. But, as they say, all that glitters is not gold - something to keep in mind when considering crossing an arbitrary line in the hopes it could change one's life so radically and, more importantly, effortlessly.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Continuing to emerge as a major entertainment presence in Annapolis, Compass Rose Theater has opened its fourth season with Lorraine Hansberry's powerful 1959 drama, "A Raisin in the Sun," visiting issues of justice and equal opportunity that continue to resonate with audiences today. Groundbreaking 55 years ago as the first Broadway play written by a black female author, "A Raisin in the Sun" not only changed American theater, but offered hope for a future when the dreams of African-American families would no longer be deferred.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | May 12, 2011
Uncharacteristically, I want to begin this column with some good news on the economic front, though it will be brief: Across the country, state tax revenues are rising substantially, indicating there is a real recovery going on. For the spendthrift federal government, tax receipts rose by $110 billion, or 9.1 percent, in the first seven months of fiscal 2011. In telling us this, The Wall Street Journal says the bad news is that the federal deficit increased a record $871 billion, a $71 billion dollar bump, because spending went up $181 billion, or 6.4 percent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
It is impossible to watch the highly touted new AMC drama “Low Winter Sun” without thinking of HBO's “The Wire.” I tried. But as I watched the first two episodes of the crime drama set and filmed in Detroit, I kept flashing back to “The Wire” - in a good way. Based on a British miniseries, “Low Winter Sun,” which premieres at 10 p.m. Sunday, tells the story of a Detroit police detective, Frank Agnew (Mark Strong), who with the help of his partner kills another detective in an act of vengeance.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 30, 2013
It's the season to show concern for the less fortunate among us. We should also be concerned about the widening gap between the most fortunate and everyone else. Although it's still possible to win the lottery (your chance of winning $648 million in the recent Mega Millions sweepstakes was one in 259 million), the biggest lottery of all is what family we're born into. Our chances in life are now determined to an unprecedented degree by the wealth of our parents. That's not always been the case.
NEWS
December 17, 2013
Legalize a drug with virtually no beneficial effect which, when used as intended, causes feelings of extreme paranoia, hostility, anxiety and panic attacks? A "gateway" drug which will almost inevitably lead to an unquenchable craving in some for an even greater high? That's the proposal being floated by Montgomery County Del. Heather R. Mizeur ("Mizeur's marijuana plan deserves consideration," Dec. 9). Ms. Mizeur has stated that Maryland was founded on principals of "freedom, justice and tolerance.
NEWS
October 6, 2013
Over the years I have represented many Korean-American small business owners when Baltimore City acquired their stores, which included liquor outlets, as part of neighborhood renewal. Korean-American small business owners embody the American dream of immigrants striving to get ahead through hard work. For the last 40 years, it was city policy to compensate the owners when it shuttered their businesses. Now, however, after many owners have scrimped and saved and worked for years to purchase liquor outlets that are absolutely legal in every respect, the city is switching gears and proposing to eliminate those businesses by revising the zoning code - and not pay the owners on cent in compensation.
NEWS
By Katie V. Jones, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Ten years after starting his business, C.R. Dynamics and Associates, Charles Ramos began to wonder if it was ever going to work. He was confident in his business plan and strategy, but it was taking a lot longer than he hoped to get his marketing and sales-support business off the ground. "I didn't think it would be as difficult as it was the first 10 years," said Ramos, a Columbia resident. "We were most tested in the fourth and fifth years," he said. "I didn't think I could do this any more - and then things happened.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
It is impossible to watch the highly touted new AMC drama “Low Winter Sun” without thinking of HBO's “The Wire.” I tried. But as I watched the first two episodes of the crime drama set and filmed in Detroit, I kept flashing back to “The Wire” - in a good way. Based on a British miniseries, “Low Winter Sun,” which premieres at 10 p.m. Sunday, tells the story of a Detroit police detective, Frank Agnew (Mark Strong), who with the help of his partner kills another detective in an act of vengeance.
NEWS
By Jacqueline Scott | May 16, 2013
Last weekend, the film "The Great Gatsby" was reported to have earned a whopping $51 million, according to Business Insider. Just prior to its release, however, many critics ripped the film for distorting the classic novel on which it is based with over-the-top production, including 3-D images and a modern soundtrack produced by Jay-Z. This is the third time that one of the most well-known flawed heroes of 20th century fiction has had his story told on the big screen. But unlike its B-movie 1949 adaptation or drab 1974 version starring Robert Redford, this film explodes with excess - just as Jay Gatsby had intended with his mansion parties on the West Egg. It also gives audiences yet another chance to analyze the one-time Bolton Hill resident F. Scott Fitzgerald's version of the Great American Novel, this time as told through the lens of director Baz Luhrmann.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 23, 1992
DALLAS -- Warning that the United States is "on the edge of a severe recession or depression," Ross Perot is urging the nation's leaders to "get started now" on revitalizing the economy, adding that he may soon run television ads to highlight the dangers of not taking tough measures immediately.At the present rate of decline, he declared yesterday, "The American dream is gone."But Mr. Perot also expressed optimism that economic revitalization can be achieved. "We can do it now. And if we do it carefully and do it well, we can avoid an economic catastrophe," he said in the first interview he has given to a newspaper since quitting the race abruptly last Thursday.
NEWS
September 25, 2012
In his recent column ("'Occupy movement got America wrong," Sept. 23), Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. illustrates the denial of economic reality in America that is continually propagated by the 1 percent. At the heart of his argument is the idea that the American Dream is alive and well, the happy meritocracy is humming along nicely, and that Occupy Wall Street is a group of slackers who devote their energies to trying to derail this bedrock concept upon which he and the 1 percent perch. Either he wasn't paying attention and completely missed what Occupy is about, or simply will not admit that he does know.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | August 23, 2012
It's been said it takes a village to raise a child, but in this scenario, it takes a community to build a home. For the past seven years, Habitat for HumanitySusquehanna and Harford Technical High School, a vocational school in Bel Air, have partnered to build homes for those in need. This summer, the students were able to give back to one of their own and help an alumna achieve the American dream of homeownership. “It's really nice,” says the new homeowner, Kimberly Johnson of Aberdeen.
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