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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | July 15, 2001
Describing the Maryland Arts Festival opening night party as a freak show could actually be taken as a compliment. After all, the lobby of Towson University's Center for the Arts was decorated with artifacts and banners from old time carnival sideshows -- courtesy of the American Dime Museum. And this was the Baltimore premiere of the musical "Side Show" -- about a real-life pair of conjoined sisters who lived in the early 1900s. Enjoying all the delightful weirdness was an extremely normal looking bunch of 300 folks, including Michael Decker, Maryland Arts Festival artistic producer; Bryon Predika, festival company manager; Tom Kosis, "Side Show" director; Shawn Doyle, Dr. Harold Kaplan, Nan Rosenthal, Janet Tolbert and Mary Louise Williams, festival board members; Joanne K. Glasser, Towson University executive vice president; Mara-vene Loeschke, TU fine arts and communication department dean; James Taylor and Dick Horne, American Dime Museum co-directors; Robert Longbottom, Broadway "Side Show" production director / choreographer; Phyllis Kolodner, Burton Travel travel agent; Roger Birkel, Baltimore Zoo executive director; Gayle Streimer, e.magination new business development manager; Caroline Hillmar, Capital One marketing manager; Irv Neuman, retired clothing manufacturer; Ann Mainolfi, Vagabond Theatre president; Mahnoosh Alemi, Japanese Language School director; Tony Montcalmo, McCormick Spice director of worldwide compensation; Leonard LeMelle, Pennsylvania Turnpike...
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 4, 2010
Baltimore's Public Works Museum, called the only one of its kind, has delighted engineering geeks and other Inner Harbor visitors with a peek into a world of odoriferous sewer pipes, spidery tunnels and water treatment plants since it opened almost 30 years ago. But Wednesday, the museum became a victim of municipal hardship and closed immediately, saving the city about $300,000 a year. "It was a great way to present to the public all the challenges we take for granted," said Mari Ross, its director, who is one of five museum employees to lose their jobs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2004
Just ask John Waters. Or William Donald Schaefer. Or Rebecca Hoffberger even. They'll tell you all about Betsy. About her raw artistic talent. And her impact on Baltimore. Betsy, of course, is the finger-painting chimpanzee who spent most of her life at the Baltimore Zoo. She lived from 1951 to 1960. The American Dime Museum is honoring the primate artist with the exhibit Baltimore's Betsy -- The Finger-Painting Chimp: A Retrospective of Her Work, Saturday through March 21. About 15 of Betsy's colorful paintings will be on display, as well as news articles and posted remembrances of Betsy by local notables, including Waters, Schaefer and Hoffberger.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | February 3, 2010
Baltimore's Public Works Museum, called the only one of its kind, had delighted engineering geeks and other Inner Harbor visitors with a peek into a world of odoriferous sewer pipes, spidery tunnels and water treatment plants since it opened almost 30 years ago. But Wednesday, the museum became a victim of municipal hardship and closed immediately, saving the city about $300,000 a year. "It was a great way to present to the public all the challenges we take for granted," said Mari Ross, its director, who is one of five museum employees to lose their jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
It almost makes turning a certain age worth it. Vet-about-town (he's a partner at veterinary hospitals in Pikesville, Owings Mills and Reisterstown) Dr. Michael Wiseman just returned from a two-week trip he planned for his wife, Shelley, to celebrate her "special birthday." ("If I say which birthday," he confides, "she'll find the largest frying pan and ... ") Michael and Shelley started out in London for a couple of days, then took the cruise ship Norwegian Dream across the English Channel and through the Kiel Canal, which cuts through Denmark connecting the North and Baltic seas.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | February 3, 2010
Baltimore's Public Works Museum, called the only one of its kind, had delighted engineering geeks and other Inner Harbor visitors with a peek into a world of odoriferous sewer pipes, spidery tunnels and water treatment plants since it opened almost 30 years ago. But Wednesday, the museum became a victim of municipal hardship and closed immediately, saving the city about $300,000 a year. "It was a great way to present to the public all the challenges we take for granted," said Mari Ross, its director, who is one of five museum employees to lose their jobs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 4, 2010
Baltimore's Public Works Museum, called the only one of its kind, has delighted engineering geeks and other Inner Harbor visitors with a peek into a world of odoriferous sewer pipes, spidery tunnels and water treatment plants since it opened almost 30 years ago. But Wednesday, the museum became a victim of municipal hardship and closed immediately, saving the city about $300,000 a year. "It was a great way to present to the public all the challenges we take for granted," said Mari Ross, its director, who is one of five museum employees to lose their jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | December 23, 2001
One thing you gotta say about American Dime Museum boosters -- they know how to party. At the museum's second anniversary celebration, they ate fire and light bulbs, twisted themselves into knots, lay on a bed of nails and pounded 8-inch nails up their noses. OK, so maybe "they" were the featured entertainers, Todd Robbins and Ula, the Pain-Proof Rubber Girl. But the other 348 folks in attendance at the Dime Museum and at the Charles Theatre ate it up -- along with the party food of corn dogs, popcorn and cotton candy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and By Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
A first for the American Dime Museum -- it made money at its recent benefit. In the past, co-founders Dick Horne and James Taylor have just requested a donation of "paper money" for admission to their wing-dings, which usually helps them break even, if that. In exchange, guests get a gander at the North Charles museum's collections of sideshow oddities while chowing down on popcorn, corn dogs and wine. Guests have also enjoyed performances by visiting sideshow artists. This year, some 400 folks enjoyed all those things plus shuttle rides and free admission to the "World Famous Insanitarium" sideshow, which the Maryland Institute College of Art helped bring to town, that was set up under a tent on Mount Royal Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | December 9, 2004
Where: 1808 Maryland Ave. When: 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Why: Bored with the tired pickup lines you hear at bars and clubs? The strange, creepy and exotic memorabilia at the American Dime Museum should foster more inspiring conversation. (However, the museum's singles-night event takes place every second Thursday, so there is still the threat of hearing "Come here often?") Information: Call 410-230-0263 or visit www.dimemuseum.net. Event is BYOB, with some snacks provided. Admission: $5
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | December 9, 2004
Where: 1808 Maryland Ave. When: 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Why: Bored with the tired pickup lines you hear at bars and clubs? The strange, creepy and exotic memorabilia at the American Dime Museum should foster more inspiring conversation. (However, the museum's singles-night event takes place every second Thursday, so there is still the threat of hearing "Come here often?") Information: Call 410-230-0263 or visit www.dimemuseum.net. Event is BYOB, with some snacks provided. Admission: $5
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2004
It is, in most ways, just another art exhibit. There is wine and cheese, and classical music, and people with art degrees peering intently at abstract paintings, talking about curvilinear shapes and undulating lines and the echoes of Pollock's style. There are also bananas. "Would you like a banana?" someone asks. But other than the bananas; and the photographs of a chimpanzee wearing a dress; and the fact that the chimpanzee wearing the dress painted the 15 works in this retrospective - which opened Friday night for a 10-week run at the American Dime Museum - this is, in every other way, just another art exhibit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2004
Just ask John Waters. Or William Donald Schaefer. Or Rebecca Hoffberger even. They'll tell you all about Betsy. About her raw artistic talent. And her impact on Baltimore. Betsy, of course, is the finger-painting chimpanzee who spent most of her life at the Baltimore Zoo. She lived from 1951 to 1960. The American Dime Museum is honoring the primate artist with the exhibit Baltimore's Betsy -- The Finger-Painting Chimp: A Retrospective of Her Work, Saturday through March 21. About 15 of Betsy's colorful paintings will be on display, as well as news articles and posted remembrances of Betsy by local notables, including Waters, Schaefer and Hoffberger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and By Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
A first for the American Dime Museum -- it made money at its recent benefit. In the past, co-founders Dick Horne and James Taylor have just requested a donation of "paper money" for admission to their wing-dings, which usually helps them break even, if that. In exchange, guests get a gander at the North Charles museum's collections of sideshow oddities while chowing down on popcorn, corn dogs and wine. Guests have also enjoyed performances by visiting sideshow artists. This year, some 400 folks enjoyed all those things plus shuttle rides and free admission to the "World Famous Insanitarium" sideshow, which the Maryland Institute College of Art helped bring to town, that was set up under a tent on Mount Royal Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | December 23, 2001
One thing you gotta say about American Dime Museum boosters -- they know how to party. At the museum's second anniversary celebration, they ate fire and light bulbs, twisted themselves into knots, lay on a bed of nails and pounded 8-inch nails up their noses. OK, so maybe "they" were the featured entertainers, Todd Robbins and Ula, the Pain-Proof Rubber Girl. But the other 348 folks in attendance at the Dime Museum and at the Charles Theatre ate it up -- along with the party food of corn dogs, popcorn and cotton candy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
It almost makes turning a certain age worth it. Vet-about-town (he's a partner at veterinary hospitals in Pikesville, Owings Mills and Reisterstown) Dr. Michael Wiseman just returned from a two-week trip he planned for his wife, Shelley, to celebrate her "special birthday." ("If I say which birthday," he confides, "she'll find the largest frying pan and ... ") Michael and Shelley started out in London for a couple of days, then took the cruise ship Norwegian Dream across the English Channel and through the Kiel Canal, which cuts through Denmark connecting the North and Baltic seas.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2004
It is, in most ways, just another art exhibit. There is wine and cheese, and classical music, and people with art degrees peering intently at abstract paintings, talking about curvilinear shapes and undulating lines and the echoes of Pollock's style. There are also bananas. "Would you like a banana?" someone asks. But other than the bananas; and the photographs of a chimpanzee wearing a dress; and the fact that the chimpanzee wearing the dress painted the 15 works in this retrospective - which opened Friday night for a 10-week run at the American Dime Museum - this is, in every other way, just another art exhibit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | July 15, 2001
Describing the Maryland Arts Festival opening night party as a freak show could actually be taken as a compliment. After all, the lobby of Towson University's Center for the Arts was decorated with artifacts and banners from old time carnival sideshows -- courtesy of the American Dime Museum. And this was the Baltimore premiere of the musical "Side Show" -- about a real-life pair of conjoined sisters who lived in the early 1900s. Enjoying all the delightful weirdness was an extremely normal looking bunch of 300 folks, including Michael Decker, Maryland Arts Festival artistic producer; Bryon Predika, festival company manager; Tom Kosis, "Side Show" director; Shawn Doyle, Dr. Harold Kaplan, Nan Rosenthal, Janet Tolbert and Mary Louise Williams, festival board members; Joanne K. Glasser, Towson University executive vice president; Mara-vene Loeschke, TU fine arts and communication department dean; James Taylor and Dick Horne, American Dime Museum co-directors; Robert Longbottom, Broadway "Side Show" production director / choreographer; Phyllis Kolodner, Burton Travel travel agent; Roger Birkel, Baltimore Zoo executive director; Gayle Streimer, e.magination new business development manager; Caroline Hillmar, Capital One marketing manager; Irv Neuman, retired clothing manufacturer; Ann Mainolfi, Vagabond Theatre president; Mahnoosh Alemi, Japanese Language School director; Tony Montcalmo, McCormick Spice director of worldwide compensation; Leonard LeMelle, Pennsylvania Turnpike...
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