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By Jane Casper and Ralph Fuccillo | June 21, 2010
After Deamonte Driver, a 12-year-old Maryland boy, died from an untreated dental infection in 2007, it's hard to forget that an $80 tooth extraction could have saved his life. Never have the words "system failure" rung so true. For more than 10 years, the U.S. surgeon general has recognized dental disease as a "silent epidemic" impacting low-income and minority children most severely. Maryland was no different. By 2006, more than one-third of all Maryland kindergarteners and third-graders had untreated decay in their primary teeth, but more than 70 percent of children in the state's Medicaid program had not seen a dentist in the past year.
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NEWS
By Jane Casper and Ralph Fuccillo | June 21, 2010
After Deamonte Driver, a 12-year-old Maryland boy, died from an untreated dental infection in 2007, it's hard to forget that an $80 tooth extraction could have saved his life. Never have the words "system failure" rung so true. For more than 10 years, the U.S. surgeon general has recognized dental disease as a "silent epidemic" impacting low-income and minority children most severely. Maryland was no different. By 2006, more than one-third of all Maryland kindergarteners and third-graders had untreated decay in their primary teeth, but more than 70 percent of children in the state's Medicaid program had not seen a dentist in the past year.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1995
In the next few years, more dentists may set aside their drills and chisels and zap their patients' mouths with laser beams, high-pressure streams of metal particles and radio waves.They'll also spend more time trying to make people look good by whitening and sculpting smiles, and less time treating disease or repairing damage."That's where we're getting pushed, because we don't have the decay we had in the past," said Dr. Paul Bussman, chairman of the public information council of the Academy of General Dentistry.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1995
In the next few years, more dentists may set aside their drills and chisels and zap their patients' mouths with laser beams, high-pressure streams of metal particles and radio waves.They'll also spend more time trying to make people look good by whitening and sculpting smiles, and less time treating disease or repairing damage."That's where we're getting pushed, because we don't have the decay we had in the past," said Dr. Paul Bussman, chairman of the public information council of the Academy of General Dentistry.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 9, 2004
ATLANTA - Mercury in dental fillings has not been proved to cause kidney, brain or immune system damage, as critics charge, says a report funded by the National Institutes of Health. But the report is being released today under controversy. The NIH is investigating whether its dentistry institute improperly awarded the research contract, allegedly to uphold the American Dental Association's stance that mercury fillings are safe. The Life Sciences Research Office, a Washington-based nonprofit group, conducted the research on behalf of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.
NEWS
November 4, 1990
Dr. John F. Clark, who was a dentist in South Baltimore for 60 years, died Wednesday at Union Memorial Hospital of complications to a broken hip.Dr. Clark, who was 94 and a longtime resident of Roland Park, retired in 1982.He was a life member of the Baltimore City Dental Society, the Maryland State Dental Society and the American Dental Association.Born in Utica, N.Y., he attended the University of Buffalo before coming to Baltimore to attended the University of Maryland dental school. He graduated in 1922.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | January 19, 2009
Please help me. I am 35 years old and have been addicted to Argo Corn Starch for the past four years. How can I stop eating it? It makes my mouth dry and my limbs cramp. I have mood swings and have gained weight. But just knowing I shouldn't eat starch is not enough. Please see a doctor and ask to be tested for iron or zinc deficiency. Pica, compulsively eating a substance that is not food, is frequently associated with such a mineral deficiency and often goes away when the deficiency is corrected.
NEWS
By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,Special to the Sun | January 10, 1999
Here's another one for the "what to get the person who has everything" list: etc -- the world's first electric tongue scraper. Wait -- this is serious.The American Dental Association recommends daily tongue cleaning as a necessary part of home oral hygiene. "Cleaning the tongue once a day, in conjunction with dental products containing chlorine dioxide, is the best way to combat bad breath," says Baltimore dentist Robert A. Jacobson.Although tongue scrapers have been on the market since 1951, the Oralgiene company has developed the first electric tongue cleaner.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | November 24, 1992
Kevin R. Doring has won what amounts to the Oscar award for dentists.Last month, the 33-year-old Ellicott City dentist received one of the American Dental Association's highest honors: the Golden Apple Young Dentist Leadership Award."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2000
If an apple a day keeps the doctor away, will a California roll a day keep the dentist at bay? Probably not. But there is a claim that certain compounds found in wasabi, the piquant green horseradish that accompanies sushi and sashimi, can kill the bacteria that cause tooth decay. The notion of wasabi-as-cavity-fighter was developed by Dr. Hideki Masuda, a research director at Ogawa and Co. of Japan, which makes food flavorings and fragrances, including wasabi flavors, but not wasabi paste.
NEWS
October 8, 2008
Dr. D. Michael Brown, a retired dentist who also had been on the faculty of the University of Maryland Dental School, died Saturday of pneumonia at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The longtime Gambrills resident was 77. Dr. Brown was born in Canton, Ohio, and raised in Landover Hills. After graduating from St. John's College in Annapolis in 1951, he served two years in the Army. He earned his dental degree from the University of Maryland in 1961. Dr. Brown maintained a practice in Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties for more than 35 years.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | October 23, 1990
Is there a cloud behind our silver linings?In a recent study, Canadian scientists put "silver" fillings, which are half mercury and half silver-tin alloy, in young sheep, which showed signs of kidney failure within months. The scientists thought the mercury might be to blame.Mercury makes fillings pliable and hardens to a high state of durability. But it's toxic in high doses.Scientists have known for some time that small amounts of mercury leach out of fillings. But whether that adds up to human fTC risk is still unknown.
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