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Dan Rodricks | November 6, 2012
So intent was Riccardo Migliori on his mission - observing the U.S. election and asking questions about the voting process in Baltimore - that he missed the statues of saints and the oil painting of Pope Leo XIII. So foreign was the idea that voting might take place in a house of worship that he apparently didn't notice the brass crucifix on the wall above him, either. In fact, it wasn't until he left the polling place in Little Italy and stepped onto chilly Exeter Street on Tuesday morning that Migliori, a senior member of Big Italy's parliament, realized he had just seen Americans voting in the basement of a Roman Catholic church.
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NEWS
June 24, 2014
What's going on here? First it's the Internal Revenue Service harassing and intimidating minority political organizations. And now it's the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office trying to act as judge and jury regarding the ongoing debate over the use of the Washington Redskins team name ( "Washington's offensive line," June 20). This is apparently the brave new world of American democracy. Special interest groups now look to resolve any issue in their favor by raising a strident clamor and then look forward expectantly as a federal bureaucracy, obscure or not, resolves everything in their favor.
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NEWS
December 3, 2012
I have to disagree with your statement that Grover Norquist was only a symptom of the GOP's refusal to raise taxes ("Bucking the pledge," Nov. 28). Most, if not all, of the Republicans in Congress have signed his pledge. In doing so they pledged their primary allegiance not to the United States but to Mr. Norquist. And there were real consequences to pay for those who didn't side with him. Have you forgotten that Maryland lost Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrist, a talented, moderate Republican House member from the 1st District, thanks to Mr. Norquist's operatives?
NEWS
June 6, 2014
Seventy years ago, thousands of America's young and courageous men were landing on the shores of Normandy, France. The names of "Omaha," "Utah" and other beaches became emblazoned in American history. On that June 6 morning, my first memory of history came alive as my parents and I heard the radio voice of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. "Our sons, pride of our nation, today have landed on the shores of France," President Roosevelt announced. "Some may return, some may never return.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 8, 2012
Who's buying our democracy? Wall Street financiers, the Koch brothers, and casino magnates Sheldon Adelson and Steve Wynn, among others. And they're doing much of it in secret. It's a perfect storm -- the combination of three waves that are about to drown government as we know it. The first is the greatest concentration of wealth in America in more than a century. The 400 richest Americans are richer than the bottom 150 million Americans put together. The trend started 30 years ago, and it's related to globalization and technological changes that have stymied wage growth for most people.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 12, 1997
China's Communist rulers were only probing to see if American democracy was really as corrupt as they had always said.The FBI and White House sound like characters in an Oliver Stone movie about their relationship.The gangsta-rap community is doing the work of its most extreme critics.Sir Paul McCartney? That will never sell.Pub Date: 3/12/97
NEWS
By Dan Berger | July 28, 1998
It takes a violent assault on a shrine of American democracy to bring about a modicum of national unity, however brief.Q. How is Monicagate like Seinfeld? A. It goes on forever, is not really funny and is about nothing.What's an Arkansas chicken company doing polluting Maryland? @Let's go pollute Ark.Civil rights and the equal protection of the law are for Koreans, too.Pub Date: 7/28/98
NEWS
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,Chicago Tribune | February 4, 1996
"Breaking the News: How the Media Undermine American Democracy," by James Fallows. Pantheon. 296 pages. $23 This is a disturbingly thoughtful book. The author, Washington editor of the Atlantic Monthly, has fashioned a powerful indictment of media more inclined toward exploitation than explanation, and pontificating rather than probing."The message of today's news coverage is often that the world cannot be understood, shaped or controlled, but merely endured or held at arm's length." What is too often missing in daily reporting - especially on television - is a sense of context, the connecting points that explain the broader relevance of an event.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
Seventy years ago, thousands of America's young and courageous men were landing on the shores of Normandy, France. The names of "Omaha," "Utah" and other beaches became emblazoned in American history. On that June 6 morning, my first memory of history came alive as my parents and I heard the radio voice of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. "Our sons, pride of our nation, today have landed on the shores of France," President Roosevelt announced. "Some may return, some may never return.
NEWS
June 24, 2014
What's going on here? First it's the Internal Revenue Service harassing and intimidating minority political organizations. And now it's the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office trying to act as judge and jury regarding the ongoing debate over the use of the Washington Redskins team name ( "Washington's offensive line," June 20). This is apparently the brave new world of American democracy. Special interest groups now look to resolve any issue in their favor by raising a strident clamor and then look forward expectantly as a federal bureaucracy, obscure or not, resolves everything in their favor.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
I have to disagree with your statement that Grover Norquist was only a symptom of the GOP's refusal to raise taxes ("Bucking the pledge," Nov. 28). Most, if not all, of the Republicans in Congress have signed his pledge. In doing so they pledged their primary allegiance not to the United States but to Mr. Norquist. And there were real consequences to pay for those who didn't side with him. Have you forgotten that Maryland lost Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrist, a talented, moderate Republican House member from the 1st District, thanks to Mr. Norquist's operatives?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 6, 2012
So intent was Riccardo Migliori on his mission - observing the U.S. election and asking questions about the voting process in Baltimore - that he missed the statues of saints and the oil painting of Pope Leo XIII. So foreign was the idea that voting might take place in a house of worship that he apparently didn't notice the brass crucifix on the wall above him, either. In fact, it wasn't until he left the polling place in Little Italy and stepped onto chilly Exeter Street on Tuesday morning that Migliori, a senior member of Big Italy's parliament, realized he had just seen Americans voting in the basement of a Roman Catholic church.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 8, 2012
Who's buying our democracy? Wall Street financiers, the Koch brothers, and casino magnates Sheldon Adelson and Steve Wynn, among others. And they're doing much of it in secret. It's a perfect storm -- the combination of three waves that are about to drown government as we know it. The first is the greatest concentration of wealth in America in more than a century. The 400 richest Americans are richer than the bottom 150 million Americans put together. The trend started 30 years ago, and it's related to globalization and technological changes that have stymied wage growth for most people.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Reporter | August 5, 2007
Peter Levine followed the pattern that he now sees as basic to getting involved in civic life. As an undergraduate at Yale, he was president of the student government. Later, after he got his doctorate in philosophy from Oxford University - where he was a Rhodes scholar - Levine did not retreat into the ivory tower of academia; he joined the civic-based lobbying group Common Cause. There was only one problem he found there. "The median age was very high," he says. Surrounded by people of a certain age who had grown up assuming that you were supposed to be engaged with your community and with politics and such, Levine became concerned about the apparent lack of civic involvement among young people.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | July 5, 2006
CHICAGO -- When it comes to partisan gerrymandering, the subject of a U.S. Supreme Court decision last week, two numbers are relevant. The first: five. That's how many of the 392 incumbent House members running in 2004 lost to non-incumbents. The second: zero. That's how much chance there is that the Supreme Court will stop this endless, insatiable and alarmingly successful effort to prevent voters from deciding elections. American democracy is beginning to resemble a Western movie set: authentic-looking storefronts with nothing behind them.
NEWS
March 20, 2003
ONE OF THE BLESSINGS of American democracy is a military that takes its orders from civilians and stays out of politics. This is so ingrained in American thinking that the alternative is almost beyond imagining. Yet there are countries around the world where generals have to be factored into the political reckoning, and it distorts the entire framework of public life. Today the American military is setting out to fulfill the orders it has received. Readers know that this page takes issue with the policy that led to those orders.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | April 7, 1992
THE LAST week of March, two D.C. City Council members took an interesting, unannounced trip to El Salvador.Frank Smith and Harry Thomas flew to San Salvador on March 23, without notifying either the American Embassy there or the Salvadoran Embassy here, and traveled around for a week, largely to formerly Marxist rebel-held territory.Members of the curious 16-member delegation, which included immigration activists from D.C., made it clear when they returned home a week later where their sympathies lay. They spoke of observing naked children running around town squares and of an undetonated bomb on church steps with the words on it: "Made in the U.S.A."
NEWS
By LINDA R. MONK | July 4, 1995
Alexandria, Virginia. -- "What then is the American?'' asked a French-American farmer, J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur, in 1782. His extremely popular book, ''Letters from an American Farmer,'' helped define the soul of a new nation. Crevecoeur's question bears repeating every July 4, as our nation annually renews its credo.To Crevecoeur, Americans were ''the poor of Europe.'' In the ''great American asylum,'' these dispossessed found land, livelihood and liberty -- regardless of previous nationality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Lewis and Tess Lewis,Special to the Sun | October 28, 2001
Almost 40 years ago, Susan Sontag burst onto the literary scene with the battle cry, "In place of a hermeneutics we need an erotics of art." And she delivered. This cultural gambit, developed in Against Interpretation and Other Essays (Picador, 312 pages, $14), has been republished to coincide with the appearance of her new collection of essays, Where the Stress Falls (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 351 pages, $27). Sontag's status as a trendsetter has long been eclipsed, but the recent essays show that her moral and aesthetic self-righteousness remain intact.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 2001
AS OUR NATION is racked by crisis, it can't hurt to remember that other countries look to the United States as a role model of democracy. Before the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, three women from Zambia arrived in Maryland to learn about American democracy. They stayed in Calvert County and spent time in Washington. They visited Howard County last week, meeting with civic leaders and comparing notes on topics such as gender issues, government policies and grass-roots organizing. The trip was sponsored by the League of Women Voters and the State Department as part of an effort to promote democracy in underdeveloped countries.
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