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By Peter Goodman and By Peter Goodman,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
Most people think of Bing Crosby -- when they think of him at all -- as the ultra-square pop crooner who was overtaken by the very hip Frank Sinatra and eventually thrust aside by the raw power of rock and the growth of cynicism and distrust in American society. Almost nobody knows that the young Crosby was one of the hottest jazzmen around. He was the first singer to popularize a gentle, conversational style speckled with held notes like groans, a pioneer who traded innovations with good friend Louis Armstrong and may very well have been the single most influential American musician of the 20th century.
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NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | May 2, 1994
THE EASIEST and most necessary way to honor Ralph Ellison, the author of "Invisible Man" who died April 16, is to reprint words that remain true a half century after he wrote them. Ellison wrote in a 1945 essay: "For since 1876 the race issue has been like a stave driven into the American system of values, a stave so deeply imbedded in the American ethos as to render America a nation of ethical schizophrenics."Believing truly in democracy on one side of their minds, they act on the other in violation of its most sacred principles; holding that all men are created equal, they treat 13 million Americans as though they are not."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 28, 1998
ROME -- When Heather Parisi fainted at the end of a dance number on a popular Italian variety show, it was reported on the front pages of Italy's leading newspapers. Wendy Windham, a blond and buxom sidekick on yet another popular variety show, was mobbed by paparazzi as she went Christmas shopping in the Piazza Navona. Justine Mattera, who does a pale impersonation of Marilyn Monroe on a talk show, is a household name in Italy. So is Randi Ingerman, who recently got her own sitcom, "Men Are All Alike."
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
The challenge of racial and ethnic diversity was probed yesterday by 82 Christian audiences across the country via a television hookup that included about 30 men and women meeting at Baltimore's Episcopal Cathedral of the Incarnation.Dr. Ann Belford Ulanov, professor of psychiatry and religion at Union Theological Seminary in New York, drew on her interpretations of patients' dreams to suggest that spiritual and physical health comes from acceptance of "the other," such as unfamiliar images of God or cultures different from one's own."
NEWS
December 27, 1996
EARLIER THIS MONTH, the Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that heralds the clash of language and culture that already marks political life in parts of the United States. In 1988, voters in Arizona approved an amendment to the state's constitution requiring all the state's business be conducted in English and that state employees use only English on the job.A state worker sued, claiming the provision violated her free speech rights. Questions from the justices indicate that they are more likely to decide this case on narrow procedural grounds than on the broader issues it entails.
NEWS
August 17, 1993
Pope John Paul II's four-day stay in Denver ended Sunday on a more conciliatory note than many observers had predicted. Rather than conclude his visit with an exclamation-point of a speech deriding American moral values, the pope addressed the 400,000 worshipers at a four-hour Mass in terms that for the most part were upliftingly pastoral.To be sure, his prepared text for the occasion included direct condemnations of abortion and euthanasia as examples of this century's "culture of death."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
Carroll educators are set to administer the state's annual school performance tests next week, but this year students will be asked what they think, along with what they know.In addition to the now-familiar Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP) tests, students will be completing a survey that counties all over the state are adapting to find out how well local schools are incorporating different cultures into their curricula.Another version of the survey will be given to some teachers and other staff members, and yet another survey will go home to some parents, community members and business leaders.
NEWS
By Harvey Cohen | July 15, 2001
AMID THE comment and celebration that accompanied Bob Dylan's recent 60th birthday, few observers viewed him as part of a larger American artistic thread. Because Mr. Dylan has developed counter to the usual expectations concerning American musical artists, his most enduring qualities, the ones that link him to the traditions of American culture, have often gone unrecognized. That voice, for one. Critics and audiences have dismissed it, put off by surface roughness and lack of technical perfection.
NEWS
March 28, 1993
School Success Without DiversityMinority diversity in schools is not a prerequisite for delivery of quality education to students. Schools do not need diversity; schools need to serve their communities and teach their students.When my Armenian ancestors immigrated to the United States in the early 1900s, they were a disliked minority. They established an Armenian community which became a major support system for them. They worked hard, realized the American dream and gradually became assimilated into mainstream American culture.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Staff Writer | June 28, 1993
Nick Ton started forgetting how to read and write in his native language around the fourthgrade, and soon after he started forgetting bits and pieces of his culture and history as well.Like many other Vietnamese who have lived in the United States for a long time, Nick Ton adapted so well to American culture that his native country became a distant picture. English became his first language and Vietnamese, his second. The United States was his home.Now, at age 19, Mr. Ton is determined not to lose his "other half."
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