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July 8, 2004
NOW OR NEVER Indulge your inner space cadet Saturday at the Anne Arundel Community College Astronomy Club's Community Observing Night. Bring your own telescope or binoculars or use one of AACC's eight telescopes to gaze at stars, planets and the moon. Weather permitting, this family event will be held from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. in parking lots A and B, near the AACC's Astronomy Lab, at 101 College Parkway, Arnold. Admission is free. Call 410-798-6625 after 6 p.m. -- Vera Adelman COMING UP Celebrate Native American culture at the 12th annual Howard County Pow-Wow / American Indian Show and Festival Saturday and Sunday at the Howard County Fairgrounds in Friendship.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 30, 1995
It will probably surprise a lot of people to learn that the largest furniture manufacturing company in North Carolina before the Civil War was owned and operated by an African-American.Also, that the world's first black Catholic religious community was started in Baltimore in 1829. And that the first American composer to become conductor of a European symphony orchestra was a black man from New Orleans.These and many other revealing facts are brought to light in "A Celebration of African-American Decorative Arts, 1790-1930," opening at the Maryland Historical Society tomorrow.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | May 18, 1994
AN astonishing scene unfolded early this month at the United States' greatest cultural guardian, the Smithsonian Institution.The chiefs of the Smithsonian stood silently. They listened while Hispanic activists accused them of "willful neglect" of "Latinos" and grandiosely demanded everything from the establishment of one or more museums about themselves to a special office for (yet again!) "multicultural initiatives."The articles about the event uniformly described the Smithsonian "keepers" -- men such as Smithsonian Secretary Robert McCormick Adams, as well as others distinguished in their fields -- as looking "glum."
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
When I wrote recently about the multi-lingual Coca-Cola commercial , expressing satisfaction that the influence of white racists appears to be on the wane,* reactions were predictable. A representative specimen from the comment by Blackberry82: " John, you may revel in your smug liberalism now, but your grandchildren and great-grandchildren won't share your amusement when they become the victims of race hatred when they are part of the minority white population in the future USA. They won't understand how you could take such joy in seeing the decline of your own kind and encouraging the onset of their future plight.
NEWS
By Harvey Cohen | February 27, 2001
WASHINGTON -- More than100 years after his birth, we are still coming to appreciate the enormity of Duke Ellington in both his contributions to the cause of civil rights and to American culture. Organized marching, protests and other confrontations did not represent the only ways blacks struggled against discrimination, though they are the methods of resistance on which historians have concentrated the most. Ellington's efforts in this area showed that those who were quiet on political issues could push the boundaries of racism and black participation at the higher reaches of society and culture.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
The challenge of racial and ethnic diversity was probed yesterday by 82 Christian audiences across the country via a television hookup that included about 30 men and women meeting at Baltimore's Episcopal Cathedral of the Incarnation.Dr. Ann Belford Ulanov, professor of psychiatry and religion at Union Theological Seminary in New York, drew on her interpretations of patients' dreams to suggest that spiritual and physical health comes from acceptance of "the other," such as unfamiliar images of God or cultures different from one's own."
NEWS
August 17, 1993
Pope John Paul II's four-day stay in Denver ended Sunday on a more conciliatory note than many observers had predicted. Rather than conclude his visit with an exclamation-point of a speech deriding American moral values, the pope addressed the 400,000 worshipers at a four-hour Mass in terms that for the most part were upliftingly pastoral.To be sure, his prepared text for the occasion included direct condemnations of abortion and euthanasia as examples of this century's "culture of death."
NEWS
By Harvey Cohen | July 15, 2001
AMID THE comment and celebration that accompanied Bob Dylan's recent 60th birthday, few observers viewed him as part of a larger American artistic thread. Because Mr. Dylan has developed counter to the usual expectations concerning American musical artists, his most enduring qualities, the ones that link him to the traditions of American culture, have often gone unrecognized. That voice, for one. Critics and audiences have dismissed it, put off by surface roughness and lack of technical perfection.
NEWS
March 28, 1993
School Success Without DiversityMinority diversity in schools is not a prerequisite for delivery of quality education to students. Schools do not need diversity; schools need to serve their communities and teach their students.When my Armenian ancestors immigrated to the United States in the early 1900s, they were a disliked minority. They established an Armenian community which became a major support system for them. They worked hard, realized the American dream and gradually became assimilated into mainstream American culture.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 29, 2005
WHEN GOV. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. called multiculturalism "bunk" and "crap" about a year ago, you'd have thought, judging from the reaction of some folks, that he'd just taken out a lifetime membership in the Ku Klux Klan. With the advent of "ethnomathematics," maybe some of those same folks will climb down off the governor's back. But I'm getting just a wee bit ahead of the discussion I had with Ehrlich at the governor's mansion Friday. The governor rehashed that multiculturalism business so he could clarify what his views are - and aren't.
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