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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
I make an effort not to swear in the presence of older ladies, minor children, and evangelical clergy. I reviewed Jesse Sheidlower's The F Word without using English's most versatile verb/noun/adjective/adverb/interjection. But over the past week I watched American journalism contort itself attempting to write about the Russian band Pussy Riot without actually naming it, and I thought, "Enough. " Today I am reviewing a book about a vulgar word and how it reflects American culture, and, damme, I am going to use it. So if your sensibilities are delicate, STOP READING NOW. Let's take a moment to allow the audience to clear the exits.
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NEWS
July 14, 2014
Thanks for publishing letter writer Roz Heid's comments, which expresses the opinions held by many of us ( "Obama's disastrous immigration policy," July 10). The U.S. is justly proud of its inclusiveness, and most people want to be hospitable to newcomers. Today's arrivals, however, are from one particular area and represent a special problem since they constitute an extremely large group and therefore are not easily assimilated. They are supported by the fashionable doctrine of multiculturalism, which encourages them to bring their language and culture with them, instead of adopting the language and customs of their new country.
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NEWS
July 14, 2014
Thanks for publishing letter writer Roz Heid's comments, which expresses the opinions held by many of us ( "Obama's disastrous immigration policy," July 10). The U.S. is justly proud of its inclusiveness, and most people want to be hospitable to newcomers. Today's arrivals, however, are from one particular area and represent a special problem since they constitute an extremely large group and therefore are not easily assimilated. They are supported by the fashionable doctrine of multiculturalism, which encourages them to bring their language and culture with them, instead of adopting the language and customs of their new country.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
For The Atlantic  the distinguished linguist Geoffrey Nunberg has produced an article, "When Slang Becomes a Slur,"  about the controversy over the name of the Washington Redskins.  Don't pass over it without clicking. It is a thoughtful, substantial article that moves from the controversy over the team name to a deeper understanding of the interplay between language and culture. (You'd be better off reading that than this.)  Mr. Nunberg looks at a number of derogatory words that used to be in common use but which over the past half-century have come to be shunned as unacceptable for public discourse, and labeled as such in dictionaries.  Here's a salient paragraph: " That all started to change in the '60s, though it took dictionaries a while to catch up. The sea change in social attitudes that led to the civil rights acts of 1964 and 1965 also transformed the way we talked about race and ethnicity.
NEWS
By LARRY STURGILL | February 22, 1995
One of our greatest, and often untaught, heritages is the culture of the Native Americans who explored and inhabited this land long before the European explorers arrived.On March 1 and 2, the students of Running Brook Elementary School will explore Native American culture. Thanks to funding from the school PTA and a grant from the Howard County Arts Council, the school will hold an in-school residency featuring two Native American artists.M. Chochise Anderson is of Chickasaw/Mississippi Choctaw descent.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 1997
THE CANOE DANCE of the Haliwa-Saponi began a program of Native American songs, dances and games at Spring Garden Elementary School in Hampstead last week.The festive program was performed by the fifth-graders and culminated a lengthy classroom study and research project on Native American culture.Music instructor Idalea Rubin taught the students the songs and steps. The 147 fifth-graders were divided into six clans, wearing costumes stitched by parents and painted with animal motifs. The students made shell and feather necklaces and rattles from gourds.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 6, 2003
Baltimore's lone participant in the effort to rebuild Lower Manhattan is still in the running. Roland Park resident Janet Marie Smith is a member of one of the two design teams that were named finalists this week in the international competition held to produce a master plan to guide reconstruction of the 16-acre World Trade Center site destroyed by terror attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Smith is the vice president of planning and development for Baltimore's Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse and previously held the same title with the Baltimore Orioles.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
John Higham, a retired Johns Hopkins University history professor and nationally known authority on American culture, immigration and the historical aspects of ethnicity, died of a cerebral aneurysm Saturday at his North Baltimore apartment. He was 83. Dr. Higham, who was born and raised in Jamaica, N.Y., earned his bachelor's degree in history from the Johns Hopkins University in 1941. During World War II, he served with the Historical Division of the 12th Army Air Forces in Italy. After his 1945 discharge, he served for a year as assistant editor of American Mercury, an intellectual review that had been founded by H.L. Mencken in 1925.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
JUBILANTLY, Steven Cameron Newsome thumps his fist on the padded pew where he sits in the Banneker-Douglass Museum in Annapolis.For the first time, he says, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra lists in its calendar of events the annual "Let Freedom Ring" concert honoring the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.For Newsome, whose life is committed to promoting and preserving African American culture and history, official recognition by the BSO is a significant revision...
NEWS
By KATIE MARTIN and KATIE MARTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2005
Holding a thin piece of deerskin stretched tightly over a small brown painted coffee can, Alex Genuario concentrated on threading a piece of hemp through the small holes poked in the hide. Standing next to him, his younger brother, Dominic, threaded beads onto his piece of hemp and attached a wild turkey feather as a finishing touch. The Genuario brothers, 11 and 9, were making Native American drums as part of a program at the nature center in Piney Run Park in Sykesville. More than 15 elementary school-aged children participated in the event that was designed to teach them about Native American culture and make use of real animal hide donated to the nature center.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
When I wrote recently about the multi-lingual Coca-Cola commercial , expressing satisfaction that the influence of white racists appears to be on the wane,* reactions were predictable. A representative specimen from the comment by Blackberry82: " John, you may revel in your smug liberalism now, but your grandchildren and great-grandchildren won't share your amusement when they become the victims of race hatred when they are part of the minority white population in the future USA. They won't understand how you could take such joy in seeing the decline of your own kind and encouraging the onset of their future plight.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Who knew that a man renowned for his progressive-minded accomplishments in advancing an educational institution would prefer to spend his leisure exploring underdeveloped lands and ancient civilizations? That, in a nutshell, describes Maryland Institute College of Art President Fred Lazarus. The Harvard graduate, widely acclaimed for launching Baltimore's once-local art college onto the world stage, is recognized as a leader in art and design education for more than three decades.
EXPLORE
September 7, 2012
You know you are entering a different world when you see the heavy cordless iron that requires a fire to heat it sitting atop a wooden ironing board covered with a bed sheet used as an ironing pad at the Howard County Center of African American Culture. For those who can remember manual eggbeaters and other hand-held tools hanging from the wall, this is a step back in time. For some, emotion comes with seeing the white wooden kitchen cabinet that held someone's dishes in the early 20th century.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
I make an effort not to swear in the presence of older ladies, minor children, and evangelical clergy. I reviewed Jesse Sheidlower's The F Word without using English's most versatile verb/noun/adjective/adverb/interjection. But over the past week I watched American journalism contort itself attempting to write about the Russian band Pussy Riot without actually naming it, and I thought, "Enough. " Today I am reviewing a book about a vulgar word and how it reflects American culture, and, damme, I am going to use it. So if your sensibilities are delicate, STOP READING NOW. Let's take a moment to allow the audience to clear the exits.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
Suddenly, in Britain, of attenuated interest, the Queen's English Society. The organization of crotchet collectors was forty. After the failure of the society's much-ridiculed project for an Academy of English , will waned quickly. The Independent reports that at the society's annual meeting, with an attendance of twenty-two, its chairman, Rhea Williams, announced, "Despite the sending out of a request for nominations for chairman, vice-chairman, administrator, web master, and membership secretary no one came forward to fill any role.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | January 22, 2012
You might call this a requiem for reverence. It seems that one Jeffrey Darnell Paul, a graphic artist from Miami Beach, had been tasked with creating a poster for a strip club's so-called "I Have a Dream Bash" last week in apparent "honor" of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. So this genius concocts an image of the nation's greatest human rights leader holding up a fan of $100 dollar bills like some low-rent "playa" while a scantily clad woman looks on. Mr. Paul, let the record show as African-Americans duck their heads in mortification, is black.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt | October 20, 1991
They arrived here expecting to find precocious little American children -- loud children with braces on their teeth -- being raised by workaholic parents obsessed with junk food.America, Howard County-style, didn't match those images, much to the relief of the four youngBritish women. They are among 15 European "au pairs" working in Howard County who provide 45 hours of live-in child care a week for host families in exchange for room, board and $100 a week."People kept saying all American men go around in lumberjack shirts and that the women are glamorous and have their nails done," said Tracy Doyle, 20, of the descriptions she heard before leaving England.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2003
Louis Campbell stood beside his Dodge Neon in the parking lot of the Howard County Fairgrounds yesterday, adjusting a round, bushy headdress made of hawks' feathers. Nearby, other people reached into their sedans, trucks and SUVs and pulled out colorful shirts, skirts adorned with bells and fringe, beaded moccasins and feather bustles. They were preparing to take part in Native American dancing at the 11th annual Howard County Pow-Wow, a two-day festival in West Friendship that ended yesterday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
Marni loves her sparkly pink flip-flops and the daily school lessons with her host family. Soon after he arrived on a flight from Ethiopia, Sammy switched his dress shoes for a pair of trendy Nikes that he wears everywhere. Isaac has accessorized with cool sunglasses and is teaching his hosts dance moves. After dental and eye check-ups, Betty is sporting a brighter smile and a new pair of glasses. Five young children, ages 6 to 9, are the first visitors to participate in Welcoming Angels, a new international orphan hosting program, organized by America World Adoption to assist Ethiopian children.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
Paul Lindsay introduced himself to an audience of students and staff at Roye-Williams Elementary School in Havre de Grace. But only his own son, Skylar understood the unfamiliar syllables. So Lindsay translated his name from the Mohawk language into English. Among American Indians, Lindsay is known as Eagle Owl Warrior. Skylar is He Who Flies with Hawks. Lindsay, 47, organized the school assembly, complete with some knowledgeable friends and lots of show-and-tell, in celebration of Native American Month.
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