Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAmerican Craft
IN THE NEWS

American Craft

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | July 26, 2000
THE MAN SITTING across the table from me in the Camden Club was telling me what I wanted to hear: "It is a great time to be a beer drinker in America." So said James Koch, the scion of a Cincinnati brewer and founder of the Boston Beer Co., maker of Samuel Adams beers and the most prominent microbrewery in America. "Sam Adams and the other American craft brewers are making the best beer in the world," he said. At 51, Koch is still the slim, boyish-looking type he was 14 years ago, when I first met him at a beer tasting in Washington.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Christina Goodman's hand-painted raven faces left in strict profile, and despite the miniature scale carries the flavor of Renaissance portraiture in the sober expression and fine detail. It's one of her contributions to a small collection of handmade jewelry celebrating Baltimore and Maryland icons. The ravens, crabs, white oaks, orioles, black-eyed Susans and Edgar Allan Poes were on view this weekend as thousands of browsers and buyers strolled through the Baltimore Convention Center for the American Craft Council Show, its 38th year in the city.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | February 20, 2008
The first time artist Chris Roberts-Antieau visited Baltimore, in 1987, was also the first time she'd been outside her native Michigan. A homemaker from a rural part of the state with a 12-year-old son in tow, she'd come to town with two handmade jackets and a couple of vests sewn on her dining-room table that she hoped to sell at the American Craft Council show in Baltimore. If you go The American Craft Show in Baltimore runs 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday at the Baltimore Convention Center, 1 W. Pratt St. Admission is $14. Children 12 and younger are admitted free.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Every year at the American Craft Council Show in Baltimore, rows and rows of handmade material sit in booths for on-lookers to gaze at and admire. And behind the uniquely crafted jewelry and perfectly glazed ceramic pieces sits an artist, whose work on each piece is extensive. The artists spend hours designing their collections, carving their materials and sewing their pieces together. The show returns to the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend to showcase more 650 craft artists from all over the country.
NEWS
February 21, 1998
WITH ITS February date on the calendar, the American Craft Council's winter market in Baltimore has at times coincided with the kind of weather associated with the season. This year, thankfully, no blizzards threaten to dampen attendance.The nonwintry temperatures may translate into fewer sales of the glorious scarves and hats on show in many of the stalls. But it will almost certainly mean that more Baltimoreans will be tempted once again to venture into a world filled with whimsy, imagination and, above all, meticulous attention to quality, workmanship and detail.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | February 22, 2004
Life on a budget is not life without art. A mug, a painted scarf or a simple ceramic bowl can bring as much joy to one's surroundings as more elaborate and costlier pieces. "Good design and quality of workmanship does not necessarily mean a high price tag," says Michael Monroe, the former curator-in-charge of the Renwick Gallery in Washington. Both can "be found in a butter knife." The annual American Craft Council Show, which runs Friday through Sunday at the Baltimore Convention Center, is a great place to start a collection, however modest your means.
NEWS
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and By Sarah Kickler Kelber,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2002
Judith Leiber is most famous for her minaudieres: intricate handbags, many of them beaded and shaped like animals or vegetables. Though she sold her bag company nine years ago, animals and intricacy inspire her newest endeavor, too -- a collection of silver tabletop accessories called Objets Ditty Peto. (Since she sold her name along with the company, the new line is a combination of a childhood nickname -- Ditty -- and her maiden name -- Peto.) The silver work includes potpourri holders shaped like cats, rabbits and rams; vases shaped like ducks, frogs and snails; coasters; baskets; place-card holders and napkin rings.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler | February 26, 1993
CRAFTY BUYSOriental, American Indian and African motifs will abound at the popular, annual American Craft Council Craft Fair, opening today at the Baltimore Convention Center and Festival Hall. More than 600 artists and designers will be selling ceramic and wood sculpture, clothes, furniture, toys and dolls.The fair is the first major event of the Year of American Craft -- a nationwide theme signed into law on Dec. 21 by then-President Bush. Hours today: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tomorrow: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission: $6; children under 12 admitted free.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,sun staff | February 21, 1999
Fantasy and futurism are competing with nostalgia and tradition as major themes in the symphony of handcrafted items at the 23rd annual ACC Craft Show this coming weekend at the Baltimore Convention Center.More than 650 artists will be represented this year, with decorative objects, furniture, jewelry, accessories and clothing.From a chaise lounge in stainless steel to star-studded glass goblets, the future looks bright for a number of craft artists. Constellations, spaceships and moons adorn ceramics, while sleek, unexpected shapes pop up in upholstered pieces.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
In a fuchsia shirt and color-coordinated tie, Cockeysville metal- smith David Paul Bacharach cheerfully holds court in his prime corner booth at the American Craft Fair in the Convention Center.He greets a friend with a peck on the cheek while meticulously arranging earrings in a glass case and describing to another visitor the melting pot of influences found in his work. Such finesse comes readily to Mr. Bacharach, one of the godfathers of the national crafts craze.He was there in 1965, when New England artisans converged in a Vermont ski resort to sell their wares.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
Walking through a giant hall in the Baltimore Convention Center, Susan Johnson and Sherry Mills stopped to admire a bronze-and-steel sculpture with water cascading out of it. "I need this," Mills said. "You may want to come around this side first," Johnson said, nodding at a sticker announcing the water feature's $18,000 price. The sculpture by San Francisco artist Michael Szabo was among the many pricey items at the American Craft Council show this weekend. Others among the 650 crafts people at the event were showing high-end jewelry, paintings, furniture and glassware, with prices reaching into the tens of thousands of dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
For a craftsman, David Sleightholm knows he's pretty lucky. One of the biggest craft shows in the country is right in his own backyard. "People come from all around the country to do this show," Sleightholm, who works out of Hampstead, says of this weekend's American Craft Council Show at the Baltimore Convention Center. "People show up from all around the world to buy at it. The level of the art there is just amazing. " An annual event for 37 years, the ACC's Baltimore show will bring together about 650 artists and craftspeople, working in everything from paper to jewels, leather to metal.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
They may look like simple iron candlesticks, tall and thin. But for interior designer Elizabeth Cross-Beard Marsh, they were more than just a decoration or a lighting accessory. They were an inspiration, for a room of soft beiges and abstract art. "I just fell in love with those candlesticks," says Marsh, one of 11 designers from the Mid-Atlantic whose works - each inspired by a unique piece of craftsmanship - will be on display at the Baltimore Convention Center next weekend as part of the 37th annual American Craft Council Show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
The American Craft Council Show has been coming to Baltimore for 36 years, and the two have been good to each other: Workmanship that is as much art as craft has been embraced each year by huge crowds. But like any relationship, it can benefit from a little freshening. So organizers scoured the country — and other craft shows — for new talent, and there will be almost 200 new artists among the 700 exhibitors this weekend at the Baltimore Convention Center. They bring a wide range of offerings: exotic dolls, intricately carved gourds, whimsical furniture, jewelry that tells a love story, flowers preserved forever as glass.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | February 20, 2012
Ellicott City artist Theodora "Teddi" Fine has been going to the annual American Craft Council Show at the Baltimore Convention Center for the past 20 years. This faithful visitor finally will be one of the more than 650 artists from around the country exhibiting there. She's thrilled to have her own booth at the 36th annual craft show running Friday, Feb. 24, through Sunday, Feb. 26. "The idea of being among people whose work I have coveted for years is both gratifying and mind boggling," Fine, 62, says of the opportunity to exhibit.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 12, 2010
Albert Cook, a retired businessman and ranch owner, died in his sleep March 2 at Manor Care Ruxton. He was 87. Mr. Cook was born in Philadelphia and raised in Chicago. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering in 1945 from Northwestern University School of Engineering. Mr. Cook worked in research for the DuPont Co. in New York City, Baltimore and Waynesboro, Va., before returning in the late 1940s to Chicago, where he went into a partnership in the furniture business.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | February 17, 1991
It's always a question, debated over the years with great passion, whether artists follow or whether they lead. But if the artworks to be shown at the 15th annual ACC Craft Fair, scheduled next weekend at the Convention Center, are any indication, craftspeople are right in step with the times -- toward home and toward tighter purse strings.After its rustic beginnings in the '70s, -- the age of the brown-speckled bowl and the wooden spoon -- the American craft movement shifted and deepened in the '80s into the realm of art, of extravagance and high style.
NEWS
By Judy Reilly and Judy Reilly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 1996
KEYMAR basket maker Joyce Schaum will exhibit and sell her work in Baltimore March 1 to 3 at the 20th annual American Craft Council's Craft Fair. Ms. Schaum will be among 700 contemporary craft artists chosenby a jury for one of the premier craft shows in the country."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.