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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 30, 2001
Much to its credit, the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra resists the temptation to coast along playing nothing but familiar repertoire. Surprises continually turn up, sometimes in abundance, under Leslie B. Dunner's imaginative guidance. On Friday evening at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, he led the ensemble in a potent, entirely chestnut-free program. The main item was unusual enough - Vaughan Williams' "A Sea Symphony" for soprano, baritone, chorus and orchestra, from the first decade of the 20th century.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 10, 2008
If American music had to be defined in only two words, these would do nicely: George Gershwin. As the composer of Rhapsody in Blue, An American in Paris and a trove of inimitable popular songs from his scores to musical plays and films -- with lyrics by his brother Ira -- Gershwin defined the Jazz Age. But he also transcended his time. That timelessness will be celebrated in a theatrical program of words, music and visuals that the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra is presenting at its home base and three other venues this weekend as part of its first regional tour.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2001
Last season may have been the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's 40th anniversary music fest, but there will be no anticlimax when the orchestra enters its fifth decade of concerts in 2001-2002. Maestro Leslie Dunner, poised to begin his fourth season at the ASO helm, has not been one to stick to the tried and true symphonic repertoire in previous years, and next season he will take us off the beaten path for music crafted by a talented quartet of contemporary American composers. Dunner begins the season in September with the aptly titled "Kickoff," a piquant curtain-raiser commissioned by the New York Philharmonic from Pittsburgh-based composer David Stock.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 7, 2006
Do the names Anthony Philip Heinrich, William Mason, Arthur Farwell, Homer Bartlett and Arthur Foote ring any bells? No? Then how about Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Amy Beach and Henry Cowell? Sounding a little more familiar? Add Charles Ives and Aaron Copland into the mix, and the bell rings loudly - we're talking about American composers. Starting today and running through Sunday, the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center at the University of Maryland, College Park will present works by these composers and several more as part of a remarkable festival called The American Piano.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 21, 1999
This is the week that Baltimore music lovers really get to say goodbye to David Zinman.The program the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its former music director perform in Meyerhoff Symphony Hall this week and take to New York's Carnegie Hall on Monday evening represents Zinman's 13-year tenure better than any of the high-gloss celebrations that marked his final year on the job last season.It includes three things Zinman does spectacularly well: interpret the music of Elgar (his "Cockaigne Overture" opens the program)
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By John von Rhein and John von Rhein,Chicago Tribune | November 14, 1990
The music world has always prized its elder statesmen, though seldom when they were alive and functioning and able to appreciate the attention.Our need for such father-figures has perhaps never been greater than at present, when there are so few around. Among the senior American composers, Leonard Bernstein and Virgil Thomson are both gone. Elliott Carter, still active at 81, and William Schuman, 80, are respected figures, although neither precisely qualifies as a household eminence.That leaves Aaron Copland.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 7, 2006
Do the names Anthony Philip Heinrich, William Mason, Arthur Farwell, Homer Bartlett and Arthur Foote ring any bells? No? Then how about Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Amy Beach and Henry Cowell? Sounding a little more familiar? Add Charles Ives and Aaron Copland into the mix, and the bell rings loudly - we're talking about American composers. Starting today and running through Sunday, the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center at the University of Maryland, College Park will present works by these composers and several more as part of a remarkable festival called The American Piano.
FEATURES
By Scott Duncan and Scott Duncan,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1990
IN THE FIVE years that David Zinman has been music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Baltimore audiences have heard more contemporary music than their peers in other cities.Zinman has introduced a steady diet of new works on BSO programs, but he has selected the music carefully. Many symphony audiences emerged from concerts in the '60s and '70s, when serialism and atonality held sway in universities and concert halls, feeling alienated from new music.But Zinman has programmed many composers of the so-called New Romanticism movement, which has produced music for symphony orchestras that is often more approachable on an immediate level and not opposed to using older principles such as tonality and recurring rhythmic patterns.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2003
North American interest in Latin American music seems to be growing apace. Critics from Stuttgart, Germany, to Los Angeles have gushed over the Passion of St. Mark by Argentine composer Osvaldo Golijov, a viscerally exciting choral work that tells the story of Jesus' last days via samba rhythms, accordion melodies and bits of liberation theology, the better to bare the Latin soul. For choral music, there is the New York-based Americas Vocal Ensemble, a talented group of singers who regularly dish up evocative fare by South American composers such as Carlos Guastavino and Astor Piazzolla (of tango fame)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2003
Randolph S. Rothschild, a patron of contemporary American music and a retired attorney, died Thursday of complications from Parkinson's disease and pneumonia at Sinai Hospital. The Pikesville resident was 93. A champion of modern composers for the past five decades, Mr. Rothschild was also a major benefactor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the Peabody Conservatory and the old Chamber Music Society of Baltimore. Until her death in 2001, he was married to Baltimore artist Amalie Rosenfeld Rothschild for 65 years.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2003
North American interest in Latin American music seems to be growing apace. Critics from Stuttgart, Germany, to Los Angeles have gushed over the Passion of St. Mark by Argentine composer Osvaldo Golijov, a viscerally exciting choral work that tells the story of Jesus' last days via samba rhythms, accordion melodies and bits of liberation theology, the better to bare the Latin soul. For choral music, there is the New York-based Americas Vocal Ensemble, a talented group of singers who regularly dish up evocative fare by South American composers such as Carlos Guastavino and Astor Piazzolla (of tango fame)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2003
Randolph S. Rothschild, a patron of contemporary American music and a retired attorney, died Thursday of complications from Parkinson's disease and pneumonia at Sinai Hospital. The Pikesville resident was 93. A champion of modern composers for the past five decades, Mr. Rothschild was also a major benefactor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the Peabody Conservatory and the old Chamber Music Society of Baltimore. Until her death in 2001, he was married to Baltimore artist Amalie Rosenfeld Rothschild for 65 years.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2001
Last season may have been the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's 40th anniversary music fest, but there will be no anticlimax when the orchestra enters its fifth decade of concerts in 2001-2002. Maestro Leslie Dunner, poised to begin his fourth season at the ASO helm, has not been one to stick to the tried and true symphonic repertoire in previous years, and next season he will take us off the beaten path for music crafted by a talented quartet of contemporary American composers. Dunner begins the season in September with the aptly titled "Kickoff," a piquant curtain-raiser commissioned by the New York Philharmonic from Pittsburgh-based composer David Stock.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 30, 2001
Much to its credit, the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra resists the temptation to coast along playing nothing but familiar repertoire. Surprises continually turn up, sometimes in abundance, under Leslie B. Dunner's imaginative guidance. On Friday evening at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, he led the ensemble in a potent, entirely chestnut-free program. The main item was unusual enough - Vaughan Williams' "A Sea Symphony" for soprano, baritone, chorus and orchestra, from the first decade of the 20th century.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2000
The music of 20th-century America will figure prominently in the Columbia Orchestra's 2000-2001 concert season. Conductor Jason Love has organized the orchestra's musical offerings around a succession of compositions that reveal the country's artistic personality in all its multifaceted splendor. The arresting brass and percussion figures in Aaron Copland's "Fanfare for the Common Man" will open the season Oct. 21 at Jim Rouse Theatre for the Performing Arts, 5460 Trumpeter Road. That evening's concert will also include the stirring, reverent "Lincoln Portrait," in which the composer's uniquely evocative harmonies accompany the spoken words of the nation's 16th president.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 1999
True to its name and its origins, the Thanksgiving holiday inspires in us feelings of gratitude for life and an appreciation of our extraordinary heritage as Americans. And in my house, right up there with turkey and stuffing, (ahead, even, of football), there is beautiful music on hand to bring these themes home for the holiday.For the plushest, good old American hymn-sing around, I turn to "Amazing Grace," an assortment of 20 vintage hymns and spirituals arranged and conducted by the late Robert Shaw (Telarc 80325)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 1999
True to its name and its origins, the Thanksgiving holiday inspires in us feelings of gratitude for life and an appreciation of our extraordinary heritage as Americans. And in my house, right up there with turkey and stuffing, (ahead, even, of football), there is beautiful music on hand to bring these themes home for the holiday.For the plushest, good old American hymn-sing around, I turn to "Amazing Grace," an assortment of 20 vintage hymns and spirituals arranged and conducted by the late Robert Shaw (Telarc 80325)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 10, 2008
If American music had to be defined in only two words, these would do nicely: George Gershwin. As the composer of Rhapsody in Blue, An American in Paris and a trove of inimitable popular songs from his scores to musical plays and films -- with lyrics by his brother Ira -- Gershwin defined the Jazz Age. But he also transcended his time. That timelessness will be celebrated in a theatrical program of words, music and visuals that the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra is presenting at its home base and three other venues this weekend as part of its first regional tour.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 21, 1999
This is the week that Baltimore music lovers really get to say goodbye to David Zinman.The program the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its former music director perform in Meyerhoff Symphony Hall this week and take to New York's Carnegie Hall on Monday evening represents Zinman's 13-year tenure better than any of the high-gloss celebrations that marked his final year on the job last season.It includes three things Zinman does spectacularly well: interpret the music of Elgar (his "Cockaigne Overture" opens the program)
FEATURES
By J.D. CONSIDINE and J.D. CONSIDINE,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 22, 1998
When George Gershwin's "An American in Paris" got its premiere at Carnegie Hall in 1928, Oscar Thompson, music critic for the New York Evening Post, was not impressed. Complaining of its "blunt banality and ballyhoo vulgarity," Thompson predicted the piece would soon be forgotten.Although he admitted that its opening-night audience found the work to be "good fun," Thompson dismissed Gershwin's attempt to bring the jazz idiom into symphonic music as a mere fad. "To conceive of a symphonic audience listening to it with any degree of pleasure or patience twenty years from now, when whoopee is longer even a word, is another matter," he sniffed.
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