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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2011
The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a lawsuit against the Baltimore Police Department on behalf of a Howard County man who says his camera was confiscated at the Preakness last year after he recorded officers arresting a woman. The ACLU had notified the department on Aug. 3 of its intent to sue but said a lawsuit could be avoided if police worked to develop clearer policies and acknowledged that the man should have been able to record the incident. The group said the Police Department did not respond.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Returning from a religious service (let's omit the denomination), I described it to my college roommate, who asked, "Why do those people bother to be there? What's their purpose?" I answered, "I believe that their purpose is to mean well . "  I have the same reaction to most public prayer at secular occasions: little anodyne sentiments that appear to do little to establish comity and civility. Wouldn't mind dispensing with dragging God into zoning disputes and school boundaries.  But then there are those who want their public prayer full-blooded, invoking not only God but insisting that Jesus participate in the proceedings.
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NEWS
February 6, 2013
News flash for Robert Ehrlich: The undeserved pot shot at the ACLU in your recent op-ed speculating on life if Mitt Romney had won the presidency is, indeed, based on fantasy and delusion ("What might have been: Life under President Romney" Jan. 27). As a Ravens fan, I must set the record straight. Far from wishing to keep Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis from invoking God during post-game interviews, the ACLU would defend his right to pray any time during the game he wants. The First Amendment protects his right to pray.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said Wednesday he is in "strong agreement" with concerns raised by the ACLU over how his agency tracks its officers' interactions with citizens. The civil liberties group released department data that showed officers had made 123,000 citizen stops last year, resulting in 494 searches and yielding nine guns and one knife. Police could not provide any audits or memos regarding oversight of "stop and frisk" searches, and the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland said the data was so implausible that it "suggests a lack of supervision and accountability.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
Drones over Syria? Hold on! ("CIA eyes drone strikes in Syria," March 16). The whole business of drone strikes on nations with whom we are not at war gets murkier and more distasteful daily - and cries out for transparency from the Obama administration on drone practice and policy, especially abroad. U.S. military and CIA attacks by unmanned aircraft have been going on for well over a decade now with little fanfare or even awareness by most Americans. And that's just as Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama have wanted it. Sure, the news is trumpeted when some al-Qaida or Taliban leader has been a "kill" by a targeted missile strike.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
As Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold sat through his criminal misconduct trial, behind him sat people hoping the testimony and guilty verdict could bolster their pending civil cases. Two former county employees were there, seeking fodder for cases in which they allege they were wrongfully fired, one for complaining about Leopold's behavior, the other for helping her co-worker with her claim. Also there were attorneys for the Maryland chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union who are building a case over allegations that Leopold ordered police to compile dossiers on his political opponents.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Del. Jon Cardin wants to make "revenge porn" a felony that could result in a five-year prison term for posting compromising pictures of an ex-lover on the Internet The Baltimore County Democrat plans to release details of his new bill Wednesday. If approved, the proposal would place Maryland among a handful of states with tougher laws for jilted exes who distribute sexually explicit photos online without consent. While most states, including Maryland, already have laws on the books against cyber-harassment, only two - California and New Jersey - have enacted tougher standards that criminalize "revenge porn.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Annapolis civil rights activist Carl O. Snowden resigned his post in the Maryland attorney general's office Friday, one month after his conviction on a marijuana possession charge and following an eight-month absence from the job. Snowden, 59, declined to discuss his resignation, which he called a retirement effective Jan. 8. He said in an email that he would announce his political plans Jan. 18 during a Martin Luther King Jr. awards banquet he...
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said Wednesday he is in "strong agreement" with concerns raised by the ACLU over how his agency tracks its officers' interactions with citizens. The civil liberties group released department data that showed officers had made 123,000 citizen stops last year, resulting in 494 searches and yielding nine guns and one knife. Police could not provide any audits or memos regarding oversight of "stop and frisk" searches, and the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland said the data was so implausible that it "suggests a lack of supervision and accountability.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 28, 2013
My periodic "Did You Know" columns tend to raise the blood pressure of more conservative readers who are embarrassed/angry/frustrated by the increasingly aggressive counter-cultural policies of the hard left and their allies in Hollywood, on campus, and in Washington, D.C. Yet, some of this stuff is so looney and/or outside what should be mainstream views and opinions that I can't help myself. So, with due apologies to the aforementioned, did you know: •The Defense Department continues to insist the deadly Fort Hood murders (which killed 13, including a pregnant soldier, and wounded 32 others)
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Del. Jon Cardin wants to make "revenge porn" a felony that could result in a five-year prison term for posting compromising pictures of an ex-lover on the Internet The Baltimore County Democrat plans to release details of his new bill Wednesday. If approved, the proposal would place Maryland among a handful of states with tougher laws for jilted exes who distribute sexually explicit photos online without consent. While most states, including Maryland, already have laws on the books against cyber-harassment, only two - California and New Jersey - have enacted tougher standards that criminalize "revenge porn.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 28, 2013
My periodic "Did You Know" columns tend to raise the blood pressure of more conservative readers who are embarrassed/angry/frustrated by the increasingly aggressive counter-cultural policies of the hard left and their allies in Hollywood, on campus, and in Washington, D.C. Yet, some of this stuff is so looney and/or outside what should be mainstream views and opinions that I can't help myself. So, with due apologies to the aforementioned, did you know: •The Defense Department continues to insist the deadly Fort Hood murders (which killed 13, including a pregnant soldier, and wounded 32 others)
NEWS
March 21, 2013
Drones over Syria? Hold on! ("CIA eyes drone strikes in Syria," March 16). The whole business of drone strikes on nations with whom we are not at war gets murkier and more distasteful daily - and cries out for transparency from the Obama administration on drone practice and policy, especially abroad. U.S. military and CIA attacks by unmanned aircraft have been going on for well over a decade now with little fanfare or even awareness by most Americans. And that's just as Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama have wanted it. Sure, the news is trumpeted when some al-Qaida or Taliban leader has been a "kill" by a targeted missile strike.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
News flash for Robert Ehrlich: The undeserved pot shot at the ACLU in your recent op-ed speculating on life if Mitt Romney had won the presidency is, indeed, based on fantasy and delusion ("What might have been: Life under President Romney" Jan. 27). As a Ravens fan, I must set the record straight. Far from wishing to keep Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis from invoking God during post-game interviews, the ACLU would defend his right to pray any time during the game he wants. The First Amendment protects his right to pray.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
As Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold sat through his criminal misconduct trial, behind him sat people hoping the testimony and guilty verdict could bolster their pending civil cases. Two former county employees were there, seeking fodder for cases in which they allege they were wrongfully fired, one for complaining about Leopold's behavior, the other for helping her co-worker with her claim. Also there were attorneys for the Maryland chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union who are building a case over allegations that Leopold ordered police to compile dossiers on his political opponents.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Annapolis civil rights activist Carl O. Snowden resigned his post in the Maryland attorney general's office Friday, one month after his conviction on a marijuana possession charge and following an eight-month absence from the job. Snowden, 59, declined to discuss his resignation, which he called a retirement effective Jan. 8. He said in an email that he would announce his political plans Jan. 18 during a Martin Luther King Jr. awards banquet he...
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
Baltimore Police want to know whether a man suing police for deleting images from his camera at the 2010 Preakness has a drug history, and have reached out to his ex-wife and former employers, an effort his attorneys say amounts to harassment and intimidation. In recent filings in U.S. District Court, police said "whether or not the plaintiff is a drug addict is absolutely material to his competency as a witness. " They have sought phone records, employment records, spoken to his ex-wife's mother and boyfriend, and want the result of a hair follicle test from 2007 divorce proceedings.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Returning from a religious service (let's omit the denomination), I described it to my college roommate, who asked, "Why do those people bother to be there? What's their purpose?" I answered, "I believe that their purpose is to mean well . "  I have the same reaction to most public prayer at secular occasions: little anodyne sentiments that appear to do little to establish comity and civility. Wouldn't mind dispensing with dragging God into zoning disputes and school boundaries.  But then there are those who want their public prayer full-blooded, invoking not only God but insisting that Jesus participate in the proceedings.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
Baltimore Police want to know whether a man suing police for deleting images from his camera at the 2010 Preakness has a drug history, and have reached out to his ex-wife and former employers, an effort his attorneys say amounts to harassment and intimidation. In recent filings in U.S. District Court, police said "whether or not the plaintiff is a drug addict is absolutely material to his competency as a witness. " They have sought phone records, employment records, spoken to his ex-wife's mother and boyfriend, and want the result of a hair follicle test from 2007 divorce proceedings.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2011
The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a lawsuit against the Baltimore Police Department on behalf of a Howard County man who says his camera was confiscated at the Preakness last year after he recorded officers arresting a woman. The ACLU had notified the department on Aug. 3 of its intent to sue but said a lawsuit could be avoided if police worked to develop clearer policies and acknowledged that the man should have been able to record the incident. The group said the Police Department did not respond.
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