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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 15, 1998
While the number of American children living in poverty has declined from the peak of 1993, children younger than 6 remain the poorest age group in the nation, according to a study by the National Center for Children in Poverty.The study, released last week, found that 5.5 million children, nearly 1 in 4, were living in poverty in 1996, compared with 6.4 million three years earlier. And the percentage of poor children with working parents has increased substantially in that period. In fact, 63 percent of those children were in families with at least one working parent, compared with 54 percent in 1993.
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May 9, 2014
The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture is hosting a book fair this weekend that will highlight books about African Americans as well as showcase African American authors and illustrators. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake gives a reading at 2:00. "It's critical to have books and role models that reflect young readers," said the museum's executive director, Skipp Sanders. "Otherwise, the risk becomes that our next generation grows up feeling invisible, and it becomes that much harder for them to build a positive self-image at a critical time in development.
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NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1995
They are one of Howard County's smallest racial groups -- their number so small that many residents don't even realize they have a presence in their suburban community.For the 400 members of the county's Native American population, that gives an added urgency to the cultural programs that help Indian parents keep their culture alive for their children."If I didn't take them to powwows, show them Native American artwork or go to Indian education programs, they may forget their heritage and not continue passing it on," said Margaret Murga, a Haliwa-Saponi Indian who lives in Jessup.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley welcomes undocumented immigrants into the state, so he shouldn't wonder that Maryland experiences a higher share of deportations than other states ( "O'Malley seeks answers from DHS on immigration program," Feb. 11). He complains that undocumented immigrants who have no criminal record are being deported. If he understood the law or choose to enforce it, he would know that entering the U.S. without a visa or passing through customs is a crime. It is his duty to enforce the law. He allows undocumented immigrants to get drivers licenses and generally do whatever they like it while protecting them from local law enforcement.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2001
President Bush and first lady Laura Bush will visit New Windsor's Brethren Service Center tomorrow to watch as relief supplies donated by American children are prepared for shipment to Afghanistan. In response to the president's plea to help the children of Afghanistan, American children have raised $1.5 million, funds that have paid for tents, jackets and gift boxes filled with essentials and treats. "It is the first shipment to go from the U.S. as a result of the dollars-for-Afghanistan campaign, which President Bush urged children to contribute to," said Leslie VanSant, spokeswoman for the American Red Cross, which is handling the children's effort.
NEWS
January 14, 1992
Health and Human Services Department Secretary Louis W. Sullivan was reflecting an emerging consensus when he told a group of family researchers in New York last week that fatherlessness is "the greatest family challenge of our era" and urged that the issue be placed "front and center on our national agenda."Over the past two decades, the number of single-parent households headed by women nearly doubled among both whites and blacks, a development that reflects the profound changes that have occurred in American family life.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley welcomes undocumented immigrants into the state, so he shouldn't wonder that Maryland experiences a higher share of deportations than other states ( "O'Malley seeks answers from DHS on immigration program," Feb. 11). He complains that undocumented immigrants who have no criminal record are being deported. If he understood the law or choose to enforce it, he would know that entering the U.S. without a visa or passing through customs is a crime. It is his duty to enforce the law. He allows undocumented immigrants to get drivers licenses and generally do whatever they like it while protecting them from local law enforcement.
NEWS
By David Gray | August 31, 2007
In a few days, Congress will return to reauthorize the State Children's Health Insurance Program, or SCHIP. The program will pay for expanded coverage for children through an increase in cigarette taxes. The logic is to raise revenue while discouraging a behavior harmful to child health. Instead of a cigarette tax, however, Congress should address the health problem that research indicates is the greatest crisis facing America's young people by taxing junk food instead. The new epidemic facing American children is obesity.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | July 8, 1993
Washington. -- I'm feeling plenty damned aggressive these days in my irritation over misguided campaigns to blame television and the movies for the violence and carnage that devastate our society.I'm appalled that liberal Democrats such as Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois and Rep. Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts are spreading the nonsensical notion that Americans will, to some meaningful degree, stop beating, raping and murdering each other if we just censor what is on ''the tube'' or ''the big screen.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | October 5, 1993
THE news reports concentrated on the costs of policing the globe, on the United States' place in the New World Order and on the United Nations' role in hot spots from Bosnia to Somalia.All of those, of course, are legitimate issues of grave magnitude, and I expected President Clinton would wax eloquent on them in his address to the United Nations last week.Yet none of the half-dozen news reports I saw mentioned what Mr. Clinton said about the most critical issue facing the leaders of the world today -- the unconscionable deaths of children from preventable diseases and hunger, at home and abroad.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | February 2, 2014
UMBC is home to students from more than 100 countries and to thousands of students who are first- and second-generation Americans. I continually think about the experiences and perspectives these students bring to our campus and to Maryland. One particular exchange stands out in my mind. "If I don't do well in my classes," a Jamaican student told me, "my younger brothers and sisters may not eat. I know I am not just here for myself but for my family. " There is hardship and worry in that statement, but at its center, there is hope.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | January 15, 2014
Fifty years ago, when Lyndon Johnson declared war on poverty, the poor were different -- "other," as in Michael Harrington's seminal book of 1962, "The Other America. " That's no longer the case. After the War on Poverty ended, Republicans told working-class whites that their hard-earned tax dollars were being siphoned off to pay for "welfare queens" (as Ronald Reagan decorously dubbed a black single woman on welfare) and other nefarious loafers. The poor were "them" -- lazy, dependent on government handouts and overwhelmingly black -- in sharp contrast to "us," who were working ever harder, proudly independent (even sending wives and mothers to work in order to prop up family incomes dragged down by shrinking male paychecks)
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 22, 2012
Some recent headlines from the alternate universe of modern conservatism: Rush Limbaugh claims the bad guy in the new "Batman" movie was named Bane to remind voters of Mitt Romney's controversial tenure at Bain Capital. Michele Bachmann, citing zero credible evidence, accuses a Muslim-American aide to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton of conspiring with the Muslim Brotherhood. Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio's crack investigators announce that President Barack Obama's long-form birth certificate is a fake.
SPORTS
By Steven Petrella, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
When Denis Ryan arrived in Maryland in 1998, he was closing out a yearlong vacation that had beaten him down. He was nearing the end of a working holiday and sabbatical, something common among young adults in Australia. Ryan wanted to return home but felt that if he did, he would have given up his last opportunity to travel the world and see more of the United States. After getting a job in security at the local Australian Embassy, Ryan received a $2,000 grant to teach the sport he loved, Australian rules football, to schools in the area.
NEWS
By Rathi Asaithambi | April 11, 2012
Throughout the United States, a potentially lethal war is erupting. It is a war that puts millions of innocent lives in danger and undermines the centuries-long sacred bond between physicians and patients. This is a war between pediatricians and patients and has developed largely because of the anti-vaccination movement. As a public health student at the Johns Hopkins University and a future pediatrician, I am alarmed by the catastrophic consequences this conflict could have on the health of American children.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2011
Generations of kids have spent summer evenings pounding their cleats and sliding into home on a West Baltimore baseball field. Now, a longtime youth baseball organization is hoping to refurbish the fields on which it has instilled teamwork and responsibility in those children for more than half a century. James Mosher Baseball, Maryland's oldest continuously operating league for African-American children, started in 1960 to keep kids occupied in the summer. But after decades of play, its fields need help.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 23, 2007
This week, it is 50 years since the 101st Airborne Division of the U.S. Army took nine children to school. American soldiers sworn to defend American soil and American interests had to descend upon an American city with bayonets fixed to protect American children from a mob of American adults screaming blood and murder at their attempt to attend an American school. Because, you see, the adults had pale skin, and the children's skin was dark. From the vantage point of half a century, it seems an absurd drama.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 17, 2003
We have come to the time of year when we remove the video-game controls -- by surgery, if necessary -- from the hands of our children, and send them back to school. And if they complain that school is a boring waste of time, we smack them firmly yet lovingly with a roofing timber and remind them of the words of our first president, Benjamin Franklin, who said: "There is nothing more valuable in life than an education, except, of course, money or a nice car." Those words are every bit as true today as they were in 1935, when Porgy and Bess was first performed.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2010
Baltimore city schools CEO Andrés A. Alonso will no doubt have a lot on his mind Monday morning when students pour off buses and sidewalks and through schoolhouse doors, marking the noisy beginning of another academic year. It's unlikely that he'll be thinking of the Rev. John Nelson McJilton, an Episcopal rector, poet and educator who served as the school system's first superintendent in the 19th century. But a Connecticut Superior Court judge, some 300 miles away in Waterbury, Conn.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 23, 2007
This week, it is 50 years since the 101st Airborne Division of the U.S. Army took nine children to school. American soldiers sworn to defend American soil and American interests had to descend upon an American city with bayonets fixed to protect American children from a mob of American adults screaming blood and murder at their attempt to attend an American school. Because, you see, the adults had pale skin, and the children's skin was dark. From the vantage point of half a century, it seems an absurd drama.
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