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Dan Rodricks | February 8, 2012
One of my most conservative friends is Catholic, but he is not a "conservative Catholic. " In my book, he'd only be a conservative Catholic if he opposed the death penalty (he supports it), opposed abortion (he believes women should have the right to chose) and engaged in natural family planning (he appreciates the fact that all women he's had sex with, including his wife, used the Pill or another artificial contraceptive to avoid unwanted pregnancy). His opposition to the legalization of same-sex marriage puts him in agreement with the leadership of his church.
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From Sun staff reports | September 19, 2014
Kate Robinson, the granddaughter of legendary Mount St. Mary's men's basketball coach Jim Phelan and the daughter of current Mount athletic director Lynne Robinson, will coach Whitman College women's lacrosse during its first season in Division III next spring. The school is in Walla Walla, Wash. "The growth of lacrosse throughout the country is tremendous," Kate Robinson said. "It's especially evident in the high school programs throughout the West Coast, so the fact that Whitman is the most recent college to add it is very exciting.
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NEWS
By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2005
He was Pope John Paul II's right-hand man, a sort of vice president to the pontiff who led the church for a quarter-century. So the election yesterday of Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger as the new pope is unlikely to radically alter the church's teachings, its influence in the United States or its role for American Catholics. "Do not expect any major surprises," said the Rev. John Langan, a professor of Catholic social thought at Georgetown University. "There might only be some differences in nuance."
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Newly elected Pope Francis represents change in many respects. He is the first pope from the New World (and the first from outside of Europe in 1,200 years), the first Jesuit and the first Francis. But for American Catholics, who in poll after poll in recent weeks have expressed disagreement with the church's stances on the ordination of women or the requirement of celibacy for priests, he may seem like more of the same. Pope Francis, the former Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, is a doctrinaire conservative in those matters, as were Pope Benedict XVI and Pope John Paul II before him. Given the views of the College of Cardinals - all of whom were appointed by John Paul or Benedict - it could hardly have been otherwise.
NEWS
August 17, 1993
Pope John Paul II's four-day stay in Denver ended Sunday on a more conciliatory note than many observers had predicted. Rather than conclude his visit with an exclamation-point of a speech deriding American moral values, the pope addressed the 400,000 worshipers at a four-hour Mass in terms that for the most part were upliftingly pastoral.To be sure, his prepared text for the occasion included direct condemnations of abortion and euthanasia as examples of this century's "culture of death."
NEWS
August 12, 1993
Pope John Paul II's arrival in Denver today begins his third and shortest visit to the continental United States. But his four days in the Mile High City will highlight what is perhaps the biggest challenge facing the Catholic Church -- or any religion, for that matter: ensuring its perpetuity by nurturing the next generation of believers.Denver is host to World Youth Day, a gathering that draws young Catholics from around the world. The range of tongues and cultures is vibrant testimony to the rich diversity of the Catholic Church (see article on Opinion * Commentary page)
NEWS
June 26, 2012
I've read a couple of stories recently about Episcopal congregations converting to Roman Catholicism ("Anglican parish in Towson switches to Catholicism," June 25). The reasons always cited by such parishioners are the Episcopal church's willingness to ordain women and gays into the priesthood, which your paper calls "liberal positions. " But giving full civil rights to all of God's children is now a mainstream position among Catholics as well as many others. Your articles make it sound like the wild-eyed Anglicans have run-off the decent folk.
NEWS
April 14, 2005
Catholic tenets are not subject to public debate The insistence by some Catholics that the church act as a kind of community association in which all members share an equal voice, and that its rules should automatically change for the times in which we live, is incomprehensible ("In the church, on their own terms," April 10). The church is not a democracy, and those wanting it to be one are wasting their time. Nothing forces American Catholics who believe in abortion, euthanasia and birth control to stay in the church.
NEWS
By MICHAEL GARVEY and MICHAEL GARVEY,Pacific News Service | August 30, 1991
With the turmoil in Wichita, we Catholics have become unfashionable once again.It's high time, too.We have a long countercultural history in America. Now the most numerous religious community in the country, we started out here as an embattled minority, learning how to negotiate a culture formed and dominated by Protestant social ethics. One conspicuous example was our willingness to pay for, but not to patronize, public schools, preferring instead to build our own parochial school system, to educate our young in our own way at our own expense.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | February 13, 1992
Paris -- During the 42-odd years of the Cold War, the United States ceased to be the society it was when that era began. When people examine the anxieties and uncertainties provoked among Americans by the Cold War's end, and by the loss of the political certainties that governed American life during four decades, they are inclined to overlook how much has changed that had nothing to do with the Cold War.The first and fundamental change is very simple....
NEWS
June 26, 2012
I've read a couple of stories recently about Episcopal congregations converting to Roman Catholicism ("Anglican parish in Towson switches to Catholicism," June 25). The reasons always cited by such parishioners are the Episcopal church's willingness to ordain women and gays into the priesthood, which your paper calls "liberal positions. " But giving full civil rights to all of God's children is now a mainstream position among Catholics as well as many others. Your articles make it sound like the wild-eyed Anglicans have run-off the decent folk.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 8, 2012
One of my most conservative friends is Catholic, but he is not a "conservative Catholic. " In my book, he'd only be a conservative Catholic if he opposed the death penalty (he supports it), opposed abortion (he believes women should have the right to chose) and engaged in natural family planning (he appreciates the fact that all women he's had sex with, including his wife, used the Pill or another artificial contraceptive to avoid unwanted pregnancy). His opposition to the legalization of same-sex marriage puts him in agreement with the leadership of his church.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
With the decades-long decline in the number of priests reaching what church officials call a critical shortage, the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore is calling on parishioners to help conduct youth programs, minister to prisoners and take over other duties that have traditionally been performed by clergy. Looking to ease demands on priests, the archdiocese has also been looking to consolidate Masses among lightly attended churches. "This is a period of introspection for us, a time to look at what we can do better to serve the people of Baltimore," said Sean Caine, the spokesman for Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
With Father Patrick Carrion away, a nun led a morning service last week at St. Mary Star of the Sea, directing the gathering of 15 worshippers in Catholic hymns and prayers, and distributing the Communion that the priest had consecrated before leaving. The pastor could not find another priest to fill in for him while he left his South Baltimore congregation to take a brief vacation. He returned in time to say four weekend Masses, but in the meantime left condensed daily worship services to Sister Victoria Staub.
NEWS
By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2005
He was Pope John Paul II's right-hand man, a sort of vice president to the pontiff who led the church for a quarter-century. So the election yesterday of Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger as the new pope is unlikely to radically alter the church's teachings, its influence in the United States or its role for American Catholics. "Do not expect any major surprises," said the Rev. John Langan, a professor of Catholic social thought at Georgetown University. "There might only be some differences in nuance."
NEWS
April 14, 2005
Catholic tenets are not subject to public debate The insistence by some Catholics that the church act as a kind of community association in which all members share an equal voice, and that its rules should automatically change for the times in which we live, is incomprehensible ("In the church, on their own terms," April 10). The church is not a democracy, and those wanting it to be one are wasting their time. Nothing forces American Catholics who believe in abortion, euthanasia and birth control to stay in the church.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Newly elected Pope Francis represents change in many respects. He is the first pope from the New World (and the first from outside of Europe in 1,200 years), the first Jesuit and the first Francis. But for American Catholics, who in poll after poll in recent weeks have expressed disagreement with the church's stances on the ordination of women or the requirement of celibacy for priests, he may seem like more of the same. Pope Francis, the former Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, is a doctrinaire conservative in those matters, as were Pope Benedict XVI and Pope John Paul II before him. Given the views of the College of Cardinals - all of whom were appointed by John Paul or Benedict - it could hardly have been otherwise.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
With the decades-long decline in the number of priests reaching what church officials call a critical shortage, the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore is calling on parishioners to help conduct youth programs, minister to prisoners and take over other duties that have traditionally been performed by clergy. Looking to ease demands on priests, the archdiocese has also been looking to consolidate Masses among lightly attended churches. "This is a period of introspection for us, a time to look at what we can do better to serve the people of Baltimore," said Sean Caine, the spokesman for Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien.
TOPIC
By GERALD RENNER | August 29, 1999
HARTFORD, Conn. -- Anthony and Carol Zadzilko had a quarrel with the Roman Catholic church from the start of their marriage 18 years ago. They missed a premarital counseling session because of a scheduling mix-up, and the priest berated them. "It was not our fault, but he had a bird. He threatened not to marry us because we missed a class," said Anthony Zadzilko, still burning with the memory of what he considered clerical arrogance. The relations of the Zadzilkos with the Catholic church went downhill from there.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Frank P. L. Somerville and Sandy Banisky and Frank P. L. Somerville,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
For five days, Pope John Paul II spoke from his American pulpit, lecturing his flock on the enduring themes of Christianity: feed the hungry, visit the sick, defend the weak. He repeated familiar Roman Catholic prohibitions: no abortion, no assisted suicides, no euthanasia.He called on Catholics to join religious orders and to evangelize. He defended the family. He exhorted the young to "stand up for purity." And before he left last night for Rome, he praised ecumenical cooperation.Was anyone listening?
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