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October 28, 2010
I hope Dan Rodricks has gone into his "bob-and-weave. " No doubt his column Thursday ( "Not enough priests? End celibacy, ordain women," Oct. 28 ) will have the more conservative Catholic faithful throwing theological haymakers his way. The thing is he's absolutely right. The problems in the priesthood were brought home to me on a personal level. My uncle was a Jesuit and chairman of the organic chemistry department at a medium-size university. He was in the order for 38 years.
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NEWS
October 28, 2010
I hope Dan Rodricks has gone into his "bob-and-weave. " No doubt his column Thursday ( "Not enough priests? End celibacy, ordain women," Oct. 28 ) will have the more conservative Catholic faithful throwing theological haymakers his way. The thing is he's absolutely right. The problems in the priesthood were brought home to me on a personal level. My uncle was a Jesuit and chairman of the organic chemistry department at a medium-size university. He was in the order for 38 years.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1998
The nation's Roman Catholic bishops called on church members yesterday to dedicate themselves daily to social justice, "to protect human life and dignity and to stand with those who are poor and vulnerable."A social justice document approved by the bishops, "Everyday Christianity: to Hunger and Thirst for Justice," is part of a national campaign called Jubilee 2000, which asks every Catholic to sign a pledge to work for social justice in the new millennium.The pledge, which will be mailed to every Catholic parish in January, includes promises to pray for greater justice and peace, to serve the poor and vulnerable and to give more generously to those in need.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
After a year and a half of scandal, the American Catholic Church has emerged, battered and bruised, the credibility of its leadership diminished, but at its core basically intact. The toll has been great. Revelations of sexual abuse against minors and the failure of the nation's bishops to take effective measures against the abuser priests has led to the resignation of one cardinal, four bishops and more than 300 priests. The devastating case against the leadership of the church is laid out by the investigative staff of The Boston Globe, which broke the story, in Betrayal: The Crisis in the Catholic Church, now out in paperback (Back Bay Books, 296 pages, $14.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
After a year and a half of scandal, the American Catholic Church has emerged, battered and bruised, the credibility of its leadership diminished, but at its core basically intact. The toll has been great. Revelations of sexual abuse against minors and the failure of the nation's bishops to take effective measures against the abuser priests has led to the resignation of one cardinal, four bishops and more than 300 priests. The devastating case against the leadership of the church is laid out by the investigative staff of The Boston Globe, which broke the story, in Betrayal: The Crisis in the Catholic Church, now out in paperback (Back Bay Books, 296 pages, $14.95)
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2002
The head of Mayor Martin O'Malley's communications department has been named director of communications for the Archdiocese of Baltimore, replacing Raymond P. Kempisty, who resigned June 13. Stephen J. Kearney, 36, director of research and communications for O'Malley since 1999, is a former director of public relations at law firm Verner, Liipfert, Bernhard, McPherson and Hand in Washington, where he specialized in crisis management and issues campaigns....
NEWS
June 19, 1992
Cardinal Joseph Bernardin and the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago should be commended for their plan to establish an independent, mostly lay board to investigate future charges of sexual abuse of children by Chicago priests. The board will act independently, but the cardinal will have final say over any step it suggests.While relatively few priests have committed such offenses, the issue has long been a troublesome one for the church, and especially for victims and their families. Out of naivete or fear of disclosure, or a combination of the two, church officials tended to sweep charges under the rug by transferring the accused priests to other parishes.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | November 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- U.S. Roman Catholic bishops, at their semiannual meeting, are grappling with problems as worldly as the contemporary "culture of violence" and as seemingly insular as the revision of the wording of Mass prayers.For the bishops, the problems inside the church are only slightly less intractable than those outside, including abortion, the increase in street crime and the recently approved Oregon measure that legalizes physician-assisted suicide.The bishops today will debate a "Catholic response to violence," a sweeping statement that condemns what they say is increasing hostility shown by Americans toward each other and urges Catholic leaders to try harder to combat that hostility.
NEWS
November 13, 2002
AMERICAN CATHOLIC bishops meeting in Washington this week are saying that revisions to their tough child sexual abuse policy won't compromise the safety of children. They further say that changes under consideration won't diminish efforts to bar from ministry sexual predator priests. But the hierarchy of the American Catholic Church has a credibility problem. For decades, cardinals and bishops shielded accused clergy from the law and, worse, transferred them to new parishes where they could abuse again.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2002
Brushing aside reports of a lack of consensus among church leaders, Cardinal William H. Keeler returned to Baltimore last night from Rome expressing confidence that the U.S. bishops will adopt a "zero tolerance" policy toward sexually abusive clergy when the bishops meet in Dallas in June. Keeler, speaking on the steps of the Basilica of the Assumption, said the cardinals who traveled to Rome this week for an extraordinary Vatican summit on clergy sexual abuse returned with high-level assurances that the U.S. bishops' conference can adopt a strict national policy that will be binding on every diocese in the country.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1998
The nation's Roman Catholic bishops called on church members yesterday to dedicate themselves daily to social justice, "to protect human life and dignity and to stand with those who are poor and vulnerable."A social justice document approved by the bishops, "Everyday Christianity: to Hunger and Thirst for Justice," is part of a national campaign called Jubilee 2000, which asks every Catholic to sign a pledge to work for social justice in the new millennium.The pledge, which will be mailed to every Catholic parish in January, includes promises to pray for greater justice and peace, to serve the poor and vulnerable and to give more generously to those in need.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 24, 2002
Bob Dugan, Roman Catholic, says he is no fan of his local diocesan leadership or, for that matter, of Pope John Paul II. He dreams of a Catholic Church in which priests can marry and have children, women can be ordained as priests, and homosexuals can feel welcome without question. He is also beside himself with anger and sorrow over the recent revelations of sexual abuse that have so rocked the church he loves. Dugan might be a dissident, but he loves his church, and would never dream of leaving his faith.
NEWS
May 23, 2002
SLOWLY BUT surely, the Baltimore Archdiocese (and the American Catholic Church) may be learning that the truth offers the only way out of its ongoing sex scandal. This week, lawyers for the archdiocese decided to release documents that proved church leaders had duly notified law enforcement authorities when the Rev. Maurice J. Blackwell was accused of child sexual abuse in 1998. They released the documents after city prosecutors said they couldn't find evidence that the archdiocese had reported the allegations, as required by law. The lawyers said they provided the internal memos because the archdiocese's credibility was at stake in this particular case.
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