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By Sloane Brown | July 15, 2001
At "An Evening of Hope Gala," some 300 guests got to see Oriole Park at Camden Yards from the perspective of the players -- from the infield. The first ever on-field gala held at the ballpark offered tuxedoed and gowned civilians a chance to walk the bases as they sipped champagne and mingled with almost all the Orioles players and coaches. Who knew third baseman Cal Ripken could perform so well on first base, as he chatted with other partygoers? Meanwhile, a steel band performed from the pitcher's mound and auction items flashed on the big screen overhead.
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NEWS
May 30, 2014
Box of Rain Volunteers are needed to act as mentors for the Box of Rain organization's Big Sailor/Little Sailor Program and to serve as sailing instructors. Donations of funds and safety boats for sailing classes, boats, boating equipment — especially life preservers and gear — are also needed. Information: 443-254-0024. Commission for Women The Anne Arundel County Commission for Women seeks volunteers to help address issues important to women and families in the county.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,American Cancer Society/THE SUN | February 7, 1992
Maryland will once again have the highest cancer death rate among the 50 states in 1992, according to the American Cancer Society.Only the District of Columbia is likely to fare worse, according to estimates in the society's publication, "Cancer Facts & Figures" for 1992, which analyzes trends in the District and Puerto Rico as well as the 50 states.Nearby Delaware ranks right behind Maryland in the places where the highest death rates are expected.Led by malignancies of the lungs, colon and rectum, breast, prostate and pancreas, cancer is expected to kill 9,900 people in Maryland in 1992, according to the society.
HEALTH
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
When the runners at this year's Maryland Half Marathon make their way across the finish line after 13.1 miles, Amy Babst plans to be there handing out medals with a smile. "It means so much to me to support those who are raising money to fight cancer," says the 29-year-old Linthicum resident. "Especially as a cancer survivor myself. I'm very lucky. And I have so much to live for. " Indeed, marathon co-founder Michael Greenebaum says the sixth annual race scheduled for May 10 in Howard County is about celebrating life.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | February 7, 1992
Maryland will once again have the highest cancer death rate among the 50 states in 1992, according to the American Cancer Society.Only the District of Columbia is likely to fare worse, according to estimates in the society's publication, "Cancer Facts & Figures" for 1992, which analyzes trends in the District and Puerto Rico as well as the 50 states.Nearby Delaware ranks right behind Maryland in the places where the highest death rates are expected.Led by malignancies of the lungs, colon and rectum, breast, prostate and pancreas, cancer is expected to kill 9,900 people inMaryland in 1992, according to the society.
HEALTH
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2012
Before she joined the sea of pink-clothed people who turned out for a breast cancer walk in Baltimore Sunday morning, Janet Warren filled out a medical history and gave a blood sample. It was a different way to show her commitment to the cause - one that will last for years. The American Cancer Society is recruiting adults who haven't had cancer to take part in a broad, long-lasting prevention study, the latest in a string of studies that date back 60 years. The nonprofit group hopes that by collecting health and lifestyle information from 300,000 Americans, it can help researchers find more clues to the frustrating mystery that is cancer - and develop more ways of battling it. Participants agree to send updates every few years for the next two to three decades.
NEWS
October 4, 2007
On Tuesday, October 2, 2007, NANCY A. (nee Harig); loving sister of Mary Carm and Jackie. Donations may be made to the American Cancer Society or any Hospice of your choice.
NEWS
March 25, 2009
On March 23, 2009, at 4:23A.M., Mary Patricia "Pat" Lance In lieu of flowers, please make any donations to the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
June 11, 2009
Edwin Leroy Vollmerhausen A memorial service will be held on Friday, June 12th at St. John's Lutheran Church at 6004 Waterloo Road, Columbia, MD 21045 410-799-8888 at 2 P.M. The family request that in lieu of flowers donations be made in his memory St. Johns Lutheran Church or the American Cancer Society, to donate to by phone, call 1-800-ACS-2345. To donate by mail access the link http://www.cancer.org/downloads/DON/formdonation.pdf, mail completed form with your check to: American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123-1718
NEWS
October 4, 2007
On September 27, 2007, Jane Elizabeth Dorn Arrangements are being handled by Charles S. Zeiler & Son Funeral Home Inc. 6224 Eastern Avenue Baltimore, MD 21224. Donations may be made in her name to the American Cancer Society 8219 Town Center Drive Baltimore, MD 21236.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 5, 2014
The hotel chain Extended Stay America is partnering with the American Cancer Society to provide free and discounted rooms cancer patients being treated away from home. The chain will offer 40,000 rooms to patients and caregivers, including half of them for free, over two years. The other half will be available for $12 a night. The effort is launching in Baltimore and nine other cities, after an initial pilot program in three cities. The Cancer Society program is called Hope Lodge , and currently offers rooms in Baltimore and around the country.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | February 25, 2014
The Johns Hopkins women will host the first Lacrosse Coaches vs. Cancer event Wednesday night when they meet Loyola in a nationally-televised 5 p.m. game at Homewood Field. A basketball event until now, Coaches vs. Cancer aims to raise awareness, funds and advocacy to combat the disease that has affected many basketball coaches, from the death of North Carolina State coach Jim Valvano in 1993 to the cancer diagnosis of North Carolina coach Sylvia Hatchell last year. It emerged as a collaboration between the National Association of Basketball Coaches and the American Cancer Society with events held at college and high school basketball games.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Mother and daughter Angela and Candi Watts were both diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. After a two-year battle, they are both disease-free, but the war continues. The new enemy is their waistlines. Scientists have discovered that excess weight not only raises the risks of getting cancer but the chances that cancer will return. Now, as medical studies seek to determine how much weight loss is needed for a better prognosis - and whether the fat-cancer link can be disrupted in other ways - patients are being encouraged to slim down.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Edmondson's football team will have its usual Monday conditioning session on Sunday this week, for a good cause. The Red Storm will race in the ZERO Prostate Cancer Run Sunday morning at 8:30 at Towson University. Coach Corey Johnson told the players they could have Monday off from conditioning if they participate in the fund-raising 5K scheduled for the last weekend of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Johnson said the idea originated with Edmondson principal Karl Perry Sr. after Dr. Sanford Siegel, the president and CEO of Chesapeake Urology, mentioned the race to him. “My principal thought it would be a great way to get the guys involved and also help to bring awareness,” Johnson said, adding that Siegel picked up the $30 entry fee for each of the Red Storm players and Perry provided a bus. “They wanted to bring awareness of prostate cancer particularly to the African American community,” Johnson said, “because it really affects African American men at a much higher rate than others.
EXPLORE
May 6, 2013
On April 19, psychology major Kaitlin Ames of Churchville participated in Stevenson University's Relay for Life Event. More than $38,000 was raised to support the American Cancer Society. More than 500 Stevenson University community members gathered together in the Owings Mills Gymnasium to participate in the American Cancer Society's Relay For Life, a 12-hour overnight event, symbolizing a night in the life of someone fighting cancer, a disease that never sleeps. Relay teams made up of friends, family, classmates, clubs and local businesses raised funds throughout the year and at the event to support American Cancer Society programs in cancer research, education, advocacy and patient services.
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