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American Bison

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NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
When visitors to Yellowstone National Park come looking for the "buffalo," park rangers gently set the tourists straight. "We definitely know what they're talking about," said Cheryl Matthews, a spokeswoman for the park. But, she added, the rangers let the sightseers know that the animal they are seeking is, to be precise, the American bison. Just like the nine animals that made a getaway from a Baltimore County farm Tuesday. Still, as spectators watched police officers corral the woolly beasts on a suburban tennis court, bison was a word that seldom was heard.
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NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
When visitors to Yellowstone National Park come looking for the "buffalo," park rangers gently set the tourists straight. "We definitely know what they're talking about," said Cheryl Matthews, a spokeswoman for the park. But, she added, the rangers let the sightseers know that the animal they are seeking is, to be precise, the American bison. Just like the nine animals that made a getaway from a Baltimore County farm Tuesday. Still, as spectators watched police officers corral the woolly beasts on a suburban tennis court, bison was a word that seldom was heard.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | April 27, 1992
BIRDSVILLE -- Big Boy hung his great shaggy head low and huffed vapor from his nostrils, staring a visitor down, looking every bit the king of the hill. He's not the last American buffalo, but he's the only bull in sight.And life is good for Big Boy and his mate, Momma, here in the horse country of southern Anne Arundel County. There's plenty of feed, a nice view of the 36-acre spread, and seldom is heard a discouraging word. In fact, many people passing by on Solomons Island Road treat the two buffalo like celebrities.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2005
We're used to them looking majestically inert, a prejudice perhaps owed to the buffalo nickel. From the old cowboy song, we know they like to roam. But leap over a tennis net like some giddy Wimbledon champ? Those nine American bison -- often referred to as buffalo -- that bolted Gerald "Buzz" Berg's Baltimore County farm Tuesday are now media stars. Their jail break got Page One coverage in major newspapers and made national TV news. And the comic image stuck in everyone's mind is that one frisky runaway high-hurdling the tennis net. "I didn't know they could do that," says Mary Decker, head veterinarian at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1995
Nearly exterminated from the Great Plains a century ago, American bison have made such a remarkable comeback that they have become a fixture in Maryland's suburbs.Dozens of the shaggy, heavy-chested beasts -- secure behind well-fenced enclosures -- have established a foothold in Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties.Suburbanites with farmettes keep the 1-ton, unpredictable horned animals as pets. Farmers have discovered that the bison -- popularly known as buffalo -- can literally and figuratively run circles around beef cattle when it comes to hardiness and low-fat, low-cholesterol meat.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | July 11, 1993
For nearly 14 years, Paul Hines has had a Churchville home where the buffalo roam.Well, not exactly roam. The main point about raising these ornery, shaggy symbols of yesteryear America is to keep them confined behind a fence, so they won't wander off to eat the neighbor's fruit or take a swipe with their substantial horns at other animals or unwary humans."
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2005
Police dispatched more than a dozen cruisers and one helicopter. They shut down roads, and state highway workers closed a Beltway ramp. All to round up a herd of American bison disrupting rush hour and roaming through the upscale neighborhoods of Baltimore County's Green Spring Valley. Then - with the nine beasts corralled within the fence of a condo complex's tennis court - the real work began. You try coaxing thousands of pounds of agitated animal brawn into a trailer. "Hectic and smelly," said Larry Plimack, a property manager who joined with police to help capture the bison.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2005
We're used to them looking majestically inert, a prejudice perhaps owed to the buffalo nickel. From the old cowboy song, we know they like to roam. But leap over a tennis net like some giddy Wimbledon champ? Those nine American bison -- often referred to as buffalo -- that bolted Gerald "Buzz" Berg's Baltimore County farm Tuesday are now media stars. Their jail break got Page One coverage in major newspapers and made national TV news. And the comic image stuck in everyone's mind is that one frisky runaway high-hurdling the tennis net. "I didn't know they could do that," says Mary Decker, head veterinarian at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Gary Hornbacher and Gary Hornbacher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 7, 1998
Call it premonition. It was 1989 and John and Kathy McQueeny were building a custom home on Kent Island. The setting couldn't be more idyllic -- 24 acres accessed by a long drive winding through a wooded area and around three 1-acre ponds and then opening to spacious fields running down to water's edge.The home, a 4,500 square-foot, two-story brick traditional, sited to take maximum advantage of a panoramic view of the Chesapeake Bay, was nearly complete. All the McQueenys needed was an address.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Special to The Sun | May 21, 1995
Whenever there's a potluck supper at Churchville Presbyterian Church, you can be certain that Paul and Emily Hines will bring a batch of their homemade chili -- buffalo chili, that is.Mr. and Mrs. Hines raise a small herd of buffalo on the family's 60-acre Cedarvale Farm off of Route 136 in Churchville.It is the only buffalo farm in Harford County and one of just a few in the state."Buffalo meat is health food," said Mr. Hines, 65, who enjoys high-protein, low-cholesterol buffalo tacos, stew and meatloaf.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2005
Police dispatched more than a dozen cruisers and one helicopter. They shut down roads, and state highway workers closed a Beltway ramp. All to round up a herd of American bison disrupting rush hour and roaming through the upscale neighborhoods of Baltimore County's Green Spring Valley. Then - with the nine beasts corralled within the fence of a condo complex's tennis court - the real work began. You try coaxing thousands of pounds of agitated animal brawn into a trailer. "Hectic and smelly," said Larry Plimack, a property manager who joined with police to help capture the bison.
BUSINESS
By Gary Hornbacher and Gary Hornbacher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 7, 1998
Call it premonition. It was 1989 and John and Kathy McQueeny were building a custom home on Kent Island. The setting couldn't be more idyllic -- 24 acres accessed by a long drive winding through a wooded area and around three 1-acre ponds and then opening to spacious fields running down to water's edge.The home, a 4,500 square-foot, two-story brick traditional, sited to take maximum advantage of a panoramic view of the Chesapeake Bay, was nearly complete. All the McQueenys needed was an address.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1995
Nearly exterminated from the Great Plains a century ago, American bison have made such a remarkable comeback that they have become a fixture in Maryland's suburbs.Dozens of the shaggy, heavy-chested beasts -- secure behind well-fenced enclosures -- have established a foothold in Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties.Suburbanites with farmettes keep the 1-ton, unpredictable horned animals as pets. Farmers have discovered that the bison -- popularly known as buffalo -- can literally and figuratively run circles around beef cattle when it comes to hardiness and low-fat, low-cholesterol meat.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Special to The Sun | May 21, 1995
Whenever there's a potluck supper at Churchville Presbyterian Church, you can be certain that Paul and Emily Hines will bring a batch of their homemade chili -- buffalo chili, that is.Mr. and Mrs. Hines raise a small herd of buffalo on the family's 60-acre Cedarvale Farm off of Route 136 in Churchville.It is the only buffalo farm in Harford County and one of just a few in the state."Buffalo meat is health food," said Mr. Hines, 65, who enjoys high-protein, low-cholesterol buffalo tacos, stew and meatloaf.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | July 11, 1993
For nearly 14 years, Paul Hines has had a Churchville home where the buffalo roam.Well, not exactly roam. The main point about raising these ornery, shaggy symbols of yesteryear America is to keep them confined behind a fence, so they won't wander off to eat the neighbor's fruit or take a swipe with their substantial horns at other animals or unwary humans."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | April 27, 1992
BIRDSVILLE -- Big Boy hung his great shaggy head low and huffed vapor from his nostrils, staring a visitor down, looking every bit the king of the hill. He's not the last American buffalo, but he's the only bull in sight.And life is good for Big Boy and his mate, Momma, here in the horse country of southern Anne Arundel County. There's plenty of feed, a nice view of the 36-acre spread, and seldom is heard a discouraging word. In fact, many people passing by on Solomons Island Road treat the two buffalo like celebrities.
NEWS
By BERNARD GILBERT | November 18, 1993
San Francisco. -- The Nature Conservancy wants to save the buffalo, and it wants you to pay for it.''You can help establish a home where the buffalo can roam,'' the ad promises. ''Please give as generously as you can.''The American Bison Association has a different idea.''Animals that people eat do not become extinct,'' says Harold Danz, the executive director. ''That's why we have so many more chickens than bald eagles in this country.''The association is promoting buffalo food products: buffalo steaks, buffalo sausages, buffalo luncheon meats, canned buffalo and Teriyaki Buffalo Sticks (''A Taste of the Old West'')
NEWS
July 12, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/detectives/. * How much can modern North American bison weigh? * How long was the Wright Brothers' first flight? * What toy is broken in the story "Alfy's Broken Toy"? WHERE THE BUFFALO ROAM Once considered "lords of the prairie," buffalo are one of this country's most noble, legendary animals. At American Buffalo: Spirit of a Nation, you'll learn about how these great mammals were almost wiped out by greedy hunters a century ago. Roam across the Web to www.pbs.
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