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December 5, 1999
1957: Kerouac "On the Road" 1957: "Perry Mason" on the case 1957: "The Price is Right" 1957: "American Bandstand"
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By Jordan Bartel, b | April 18, 2012
One thing is clear: Americans loved Dick Clark. As soon as the news of Clark's death at 82 of a heart attack reached the world Tuesday afternoon, tributes, thoughts, reflections (and a few loving jokes) flooded Twitter - both from famous folks and regular fans who grew up with the TV mainstay.  Here are some of our favorites so far: • Thanks for everything, Dick Clark. You changed the world of pop music and you will be sorely missed. -- Sony Music Global, @SonyMusicGlobal •  Am still amazed that Dick Clark was only 82...
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FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 15, 1994
Today includes music moguls on an "American Bandstand" special, and bumpy skiing moguls on CBS's evening Olympics coverage. Also, there's a hot "Roc" on Fox, and a Michael Jackson special, of sorts, on PBS.* "American Bandstand's Teen Idols" (8-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Dorian Gray -- well, make that Dick Clark -- acts as host for this potpourri of interviews, clips and nostalgia from one of TV's most durable and influential music series. NBC.* "The 1994 Winter Olympic Games" (8-11:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
Fifty years ago, Baltimore was a grimy, rowdy, unpretentious town of rolled-up sleeves and red-hot steel, a warren of row homes and warehouses, a place where a man could walk into a bar on Greenmount Avenue and gab with a Colts player over a cold Natty Boh. "We were working-class people," said Gino Marchetti, the Hall of Fame defensive end who worked in the mills at Bethlehem Steel that offseason. "It seemed like we knew a lot of [average] people, and people sure as hell got to know us. Autographs weren't much in demand.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 20, 2007
No other teen film heroine has enjoyed herself as much as Tracy Turnblad (Nikki Blonsky) in Hair- spray. She's always singing about her elation and her delight in feeling that elation. She belts out all her love: for her hometown in "Good Morning, Baltimore," for Zac Efron's sympathetic, ready-for-action Link Larkin in "I Can Hear the Bells" and for an optimistic and open-for-anything age of music and dancing in "You Can't Stop the Beat." Tracy may live in an East Baltimore rowhouse, but her songs expose a gaudy-yet-wholesome, split-level pop psyche that helps the filmmakers maintain the verve of John Waters' 1988 comedy and provides this adaptation of the 2002 Broadway musical version with an effervescence all its own. In the scintillating Marc Shaiman-Scott Wittman score, Tracy is as self-aware as she is gung-ho about romance, idealism and rock 'n' roll.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 1, 1996
What? It's New Year's Day, and you say you're not going to watch football? What sort of American are you? C'mon, let's see some citizenship papers. OK, if you insist on continuing with this madness, there are a few things on TV today that don't take place within the confines of a 300-foot-long field. But not many.* "Tournament of Roses Parade" (11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11; 11 a.m.-1 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2; 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- If you want to watch anything other than this parade this afternoon, good luck.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | June 25, 1994
For years, America's TV treatment of the World Cup has been along the lines of "Never give a soccer an even break." But today, ABC presents two matches, ESPN presents two more, which adds up to at least six commercial-free hours of soccer coverage. To a soccer fan, that's like striking Goooooold! Except that six hours is reduced substantially in Baltimore, where WJZ, Channel 13, is pre-empting the first game (Belgium vs. the Netherlands) of ABC's double-header to present daytime coverage of its Saturday Orioles game.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Battaglio and Stephen Battaglio,knight ridder/tribune | November 24, 2002
The Beatles were one of the few superstar music acts that never appeared on American Bandstand. But that won't keep the group from playing on American Dreams, the NBC drama that uses the classic dance show to tell stories about a Philadelphia family in the 1960s. American Dreams creator and executive producer Jonathan Prince says a clip of the Beatles' historic first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 will be in a January episode. Footage of big-name '60s music acts has helped make American Dreams a Sunday night hit. Up to now, the series has drawn performances from the Bandstand archives owned by Dick Clark, an executive producer of American Dreams.
FEATURES
By Andy Meisler and Andy Meisler,New York Times News Service | August 8, 1995
For the better part of three decades, Don Cornelius has straddled the worlds of popular music and broadcasting. During that time, both businesses have changed almost beyond recognition.In response, Mr. Cornelius, the creator, executive producer and former host of the syndicated television program "Soul Train," has changed course very little. He has clung steadfastly to his niche audience, and in return much of that audience has remained loyal. The heaviest concentration of "Soul Train" viewers is in urban markets with large black communities, like Baltimore, New York and Charleston, S.C.Many less-than-with-it baby boomers have mistakenly consigned "Soul Train" to the Afro- and platform shoe-friendly 1970s, but -- surprise -- the series is about to enter its 25th season, making it the longest-lasting program in first-run syndication.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 21, 1997
IN THE PAWN shops, the spirit of the season is quiet desperation. It's the shadow land of American commerce. At the Kinder and Gentler Pawn Shop, on Liberty Road in northwest Baltimore County, Christmas comes and goes, sometimes in the same instant, depending on the thin line separating those who have and those who wish they had.There's the old man who wanders in with his desires expressed in urgent little squawks. He's speaking through a postsurgical voice box. In order to raise a little cash in a hurry, he wishes to pawn the sound of his own voice.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 20, 2007
No other teen film heroine has enjoyed herself as much as Tracy Turnblad (Nikki Blonsky) in Hair- spray. She's always singing about her elation and her delight in feeling that elation. She belts out all her love: for her hometown in "Good Morning, Baltimore," for Zac Efron's sympathetic, ready-for-action Link Larkin in "I Can Hear the Bells" and for an optimistic and open-for-anything age of music and dancing in "You Can't Stop the Beat." Tracy may live in an East Baltimore rowhouse, but her songs expose a gaudy-yet-wholesome, split-level pop psyche that helps the filmmakers maintain the verve of John Waters' 1988 comedy and provides this adaptation of the 2002 Broadway musical version with an effervescence all its own. In the scintillating Marc Shaiman-Scott Wittman score, Tracy is as self-aware as she is gung-ho about romance, idealism and rock 'n' roll.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
Oh, the things one could learn yesterday from watching the televised testimony of Condoleezza Rice, President Bush's national security adviser: 1. Rice, a former provost of Stanford University, appears to be too busy or too incurious to read much outside of her briefing papers. Take, for example, the recent best-selling book by Richard Clarke, the president's former top counter-terrorism official. In it, Clarke charges that Bush and the White House all but ignored the threat of al-Qaida until the September 2001 attacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 23, 2003
When Donna Summer answers the phone at her Nashville home, her greeting is gravelly. The "hello" sounds almost muffled. It's around 9 a.m., and apparently her voice hasn't awakened yet. She won't be home too long, anyway, because there's more road work to do. For weeks, she's been traveling the country, doing a round of morning shows, daytime talk shows, a little radio. Surely you've heard by now that the woman known in the '70s as the First Lady of Love and the Queen of Disco has published a memoir called Ordinary Girl: The Journey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Battaglio and Stephen Battaglio,knight ridder/tribune | November 24, 2002
The Beatles were one of the few superstar music acts that never appeared on American Bandstand. But that won't keep the group from playing on American Dreams, the NBC drama that uses the classic dance show to tell stories about a Philadelphia family in the 1960s. American Dreams creator and executive producer Jonathan Prince says a clip of the Beatles' historic first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 will be in a January episode. Footage of big-name '60s music acts has helped make American Dreams a Sunday night hit. Up to now, the series has drawn performances from the Bandstand archives owned by Dick Clark, an executive producer of American Dreams.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999
1957: Kerouac "On the Road" 1957: "Perry Mason" on the case 1957: "The Price is Right" 1957: "American Bandstand"
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 21, 1997
IN THE PAWN shops, the spirit of the season is quiet desperation. It's the shadow land of American commerce. At the Kinder and Gentler Pawn Shop, on Liberty Road in northwest Baltimore County, Christmas comes and goes, sometimes in the same instant, depending on the thin line separating those who have and those who wish they had.There's the old man who wanders in with his desires expressed in urgent little squawks. He's speaking through a postsurgical voice box. In order to raise a little cash in a hurry, he wishes to pawn the sound of his own voice.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
Oh, the things one could learn yesterday from watching the televised testimony of Condoleezza Rice, President Bush's national security adviser: 1. Rice, a former provost of Stanford University, appears to be too busy or too incurious to read much outside of her briefing papers. Take, for example, the recent best-selling book by Richard Clarke, the president's former top counter-terrorism official. In it, Clarke charges that Bush and the White House all but ignored the threat of al-Qaida until the September 2001 attacks.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
Fifty years ago, Baltimore was a grimy, rowdy, unpretentious town of rolled-up sleeves and red-hot steel, a warren of row homes and warehouses, a place where a man could walk into a bar on Greenmount Avenue and gab with a Colts player over a cold Natty Boh. "We were working-class people," said Gino Marchetti, the Hall of Fame defensive end who worked in the mills at Bethlehem Steel that offseason. "It seemed like we knew a lot of [average] people, and people sure as hell got to know us. Autographs weren't much in demand.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 1, 1996
What? It's New Year's Day, and you say you're not going to watch football? What sort of American are you? C'mon, let's see some citizenship papers. OK, if you insist on continuing with this madness, there are a few things on TV today that don't take place within the confines of a 300-foot-long field. But not many.* "Tournament of Roses Parade" (11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11; 11 a.m.-1 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2; 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- If you want to watch anything other than this parade this afternoon, good luck.
FEATURES
By Andy Meisler and Andy Meisler,New York Times News Service | August 8, 1995
For the better part of three decades, Don Cornelius has straddled the worlds of popular music and broadcasting. During that time, both businesses have changed almost beyond recognition.In response, Mr. Cornelius, the creator, executive producer and former host of the syndicated television program "Soul Train," has changed course very little. He has clung steadfastly to his niche audience, and in return much of that audience has remained loyal. The heaviest concentration of "Soul Train" viewers is in urban markets with large black communities, like Baltimore, New York and Charleston, S.C.Many less-than-with-it baby boomers have mistakenly consigned "Soul Train" to the Afro- and platform shoe-friendly 1970s, but -- surprise -- the series is about to enter its 25th season, making it the longest-lasting program in first-run syndication.
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