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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
The Walters Art Museum has been granted $111,615 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to support a nearly two-year project called "American Visions: Engaging the Community with American Art. " "In the minds of the public, the Walters is a place known more for ancient, medieval, Renaissance and baroque work," said Joy Heyrman, development director at the Walters, "but the founder, William Walters, cut his teeth as a collector on...
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | April 1, 2014
Your Bank of America credit card will get you free admission this weekend to the  American Visionary Art Museum. It's part of the bank's Museums on Us program, which offers free weekend access to a range of museums on the first full weekend of each month this year. Both Bank of America and Merrill Lynch credit and debit cardholders can get in free at the downtown museum on Key Highway on Saturday and Sunday. The program now has a mobile site that gives a full list of all 150 museums in the program.
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NEWS
By CHARLES STORCH and CHARLES STORCH,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 7, 2006
"Stability" was the term of art last year for North American art museums, as they maintained or built on advances made over the prior two years, according to a new survey. The New York-based Association of Art Museum Directors said Wednesday that 73 percent of the 129 museums responding to its survey reported steady or increased attendance in 2005. That compared with 70 percent seeing such results in 2004. The survey also found that 84 percent of respondents said their total revenue had increased or was the same as in the prior previous year, up from 79 percent in 2004.
NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
As a young girl, Jean Brinton Jaecks would sit around her family's dinner table in Severn and listen to her parents talk about nature, light and color. Her mother, Mary, was a painter; her father, Earl, created wood sculptures as a break from his job as a designer at Westinghouse. "Back in the 1960s, they began an organic garden," Jaecks recalls. "In 1961, that was unheard of. The neighbors made fun of them. " Love of the outdoors and the arts were reinforced during summer vacations, when the family would drive to Cape Ann and Rockport in Maine.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
David Winfield Scott, a noted American artist and author and former Eastern Shore resident who was the founding director of the National Museum of American Art, died of multiple organ failure Monday at an Austin, Texas, hospice. He was 92. Dr. Scott was born in Fall River, Mass., and raised in Claremont, Calif., where his father was a professor at Pomona College. After graduating from the Webb School in Claremont, he studied painting with Millard Sheets, a prominent California watercolorist, who became a formative influence on the young artist.
NEWS
June 1, 1997
IN THE CURRENT CLIMATE, an artist who painted a 6-year-old girl nude, sitting playfully on a chair, might be accused of exploiting young children, despite the innocence portrayed. But William Sergeant Kendall painted his daughter Beatrice as "Mischief" in 1908. It was the first work acquired by the embryonic Baltimore Museum of Art, given by a founder, A. R. L. Dohme, in 1914. Dr. Dohme's own daughter, Adelyn (Breeskin), grew up to be the BMA's director from 1947 to 1962, attracting its greatest collections and making the BMA a force in modern art.Kendall's "Mischief" is just one of many surprises and delights in the reopened 19 galleries of pre-1925 American painting and decorative art at the BMA. They fill the original building designed by John Russell Pope, which was opened in 1929 and closed the past two years for renovation.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 10, 1991
David Driskell remembers, "My parents would look at me and look at Jimmy, my white playmate, and they'd say to me . . . 'You can't be as good as Jimmy. You've got to be better than Jimmy, or else you won't make it.' "He made it. Today, at 60, David Driskell has written half a dozen books and organized 27 exhibitions on African-American art. He has become so widely known an expert that he has lectured on the subject from New York to Amsterdam to Cape Town, and two years ago the Arts Council of Great Britain funded a documentary film on his contributions to African-American art history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | May 16, 1999
Nothing is less real than realism," Georgia O'Keeffe once said. "Details are confusing. It is only by selection, by elimination, by emphasis that we get at the real meaning of things."
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 6, 1996
Between 1910 and 1950, America underwent profound and irreversible changes. We fought in two world wars and went through the worst depression in our history. We experienced an immense growth in industry. We saw the coming of the automobile, movies, radio and television. And we witnessed a huge migration from rural to urban America in response to industrialization, the Depression and World War II.Not surprisingly, art in this country underwent similar upheaval. In 1910, America was an outpost of the art world; its center was Paris, where Matisse and Picasso caught the eye of forward-looking collectors such as Gertrude Stein and Baltimore's Cone sisters.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | August 3, 1997
To look at Georgia O'Keeffe 81 times through the lens of Alfred Stieglitz is to watch someone you thought you knew slowly become an enigma.Gone is the flinty-looking, aged icon of the Southwest, our image of O'Keeffe for decades before her death in 1986. In its place, Stieglitz gives us a much younger O'Keeffe, in photographs taken between 1917 and 1937. More important, the O'Keeffe he presents is not a single entity, but a prismatic, multifaceted presence.The 81 photographs are presented as a single work of art. Called "Georgia O'Keeffe: A Portrait by Alfred Stieglitz," it is on view at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art.It stands as one of the most unusual portraits in all of art history, and more besides: It is also a drama of human emotion as revealed by the human body, a record of one of the century's great love affairs, a set of variations on early 20th-century modernism, and a successful collaboration by two of the era's most famous artists.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | September 14, 2012
The painterly colors are as bright as a tropical sun in some of the artwork in the "Contemporary Latin American Art Exhibition" at the Columbia Art Center. Although the subject matter of all four artists tends to be puzzling, it's easy to enjoy their otherwise baffling imagery. The two most colorful artists in this exhibit curated by Marcel Wah are Jose Acosta and Jacqueline Matute. Acosta's acrylic and mixed media paintings are densely conceived compositions in which humanoid figures, natural references and pure bursts of color hold your attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
The Walters Art Museum has been granted $111,615 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to support a nearly two-year project called "American Visions: Engaging the Community with American Art. " "In the minds of the public, the Walters is a place known more for ancient, medieval, Renaissance and baroque work," said Joy Heyrman, development director at the Walters, "but the founder, William Walters, cut his teeth as a collector on...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
Mr. Rain's Fun House, the top-floor restaurant at the American Visionary Art Museum is the answer to the question, What is Baltimore's most shamefully overlooked restaurant. The review goes into a few of the reasons why this is so -- the name isn't doing anyone any favors, I think. And the location all but makes walk-in business non-existent. It's worth getting to know. Here's the review of Mr. Rain's Fun House .
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Five years ago, Shawn Theron was waiting tables and managing the bar of the Joy America Cafe inside the American Visionary Art Museum . Today, his work is hanging on the gallery walls. He says it's all because his beloved grandmother — who raised the boy and whom he nicknamed "Red" — urged him from her deathbed to "turn on the light. " "She said it many times," says the 38-year-old artist: "'Turn on the light. Turn on the light.' And it had nothing to do with switches.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
When Scott Weaver's alcoholic father walked away from his family to live on the streets, the then-9-year-old boy found solace in working on an assignment for his fourth-grade class to a create a sculpture from toothpicks. Forty-two years later, Weaver is still tinkering with the project assigned in 1969 by his teacher, Sue Rathbun. And the result - a 9-foot-tall, 8-foot-wide homage to Weaver's native city of San Francisco incorporating 104,588 of the short pointy sticks, is attracting gawkers at "All Things Round," the new long-term show opening this weekend at the American Visionary Art Museum . (As Weaver puts it: "I wanted to make a bigger sculpture than anyone else in class.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
Saturday is the day Fifi looks forward to every year. Fifi is the American Visionary Art Museum 's giant pink poodle-with-wheels, who once a year ventures outside to take part in what is clearly Baltimore's funkiest annual event, the Kinetic Sculpture Race . This year, some 36 land- and seaworthy vehicles, all strictly people-powered, will be taking part in the 15-mile race over land, sea, mud and sand. Like Fifi, some are designed to resemble animals; one of last year's crowd favorites was a hookah-smoking caterpillar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | May 9, 1999
What is American art, and what is it about the art produced in this country in the 20th century that makes it unique?That is the fascinating question raised by "The American Century: Art & Culture 1900-1950," a landmark survey of art in the United States undertaken by New York's Whitney Museum of American Art. The first half of the show opened last month and runs through Aug. 22. Part II, which continues the story of American art from the 1950s to the...
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 13, 2003
Romare Bearden was one of the most original, innovative and important figures in 20th-century American art, so The Art of Romare Bearden, the monumental retrospective exhibition of his work that opens tomorrow at Washington's National Gallery, is an altogether fitting - if, it must be said, overdue - acknowledgement of his achievement. Born in 1911, Bearden is the first African-American artist ever to be the subject of a major show at the National Gallery in the 62 years since it opened its doors to the public.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
Numbers and art typically don't mix, but both were on exhibit at the American Visionary Art Museum Monday. The Baltimore museum hosted a one-day seminar with PNC Bank on what artists need to know to survive and thrive on the business side of their craft. About 35 painters, musicians, writers and other artists attended the free crash course on budgeting and cash flow. Aspiring writer Carita Ellis-Espola was among them, driving an hour and a half from Harrisburg, Pa., to pick up financial tips.
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