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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1995
A politically connected Baltimore businessman says he is no longer in violation of state campaign finance laws.Willie Runyon and his American Ambulance and Oxygen Service had together contributed about $17,000 over the legal limit to various candidates in the 1994 election, according to records released by Mr. Runyon's lawyer this week.But the records also show that Mr. Runyon and American Ambulance have since obtained refunds in that amount from the candidates, putting him and the company at or below the legal limit.
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NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Michael Dresser and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2000
In what his lawyers are calling "some final housecleaning," former state Sen. Larry Young has paid a $2,250 fee, accepted a formal reprimand and admitted he filed incomplete financial disclosure statements over his last four years as a legislator. Young, in five amended reports to the state Ethics Commission, for the first time acknowledged receiving money or gifts from several entities with business interests before the General Assembly. That conduct led to his expulsion from the Senate three years ago. The amended reports were made public yesterday as part of a settlement ending the commission's 3-year-old investigation of the West Baltimore Democrat.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
The ambulance company owned by a Baltimore businessman who is a major contributor to Democratic campaigns has agreed to pay $1.475 million to resolve allegations it improperly billed Medicare and Medicaid for ambulance trips to doctors' offices, the U.S. attorney said yesterday.American Ambulance and Oxygen Co., which is owned by Willie Runyon, a political fund-raiser at the local, state and federal levels, acknowledged its submission of claims was not consistent with Medicare reimbursement policy, but otherwise denied the allegations and disputes that its claims were improper.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
Willie Runyon, the owner of a private ambulance company in Baltimore and a major financial contributor to Democrats from City Hall to the White House, died Thursday of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 76.Mr. Runyon, the son of a West Virginia coal miner who owned American Ambulance and Oxygen Service Co., died in Brightwood Nursing Home in Lutherville, said his wife, Patricia Runyon.Among recipients of Mr. Runyon's largess during the past 30 years were Govs. Marvin Mandel, William Donald Schaefer and Parris N. Glendening, and the Clinton-Gore re-election campaign.
NEWS
By SCOTT HIGHAM, WALTER F. ROCHE JR., AND WILLIAM F. ZORZI JR. and SCOTT HIGHAM, WALTER F. ROCHE JR., AND WILLIAM F. ZORZI JR.,SUN STAFF Sun news researcher Dee Lyons contributed to this article | December 20, 1997
The chief of a Baltimore ambulance company bought a $24,800 luxury Lincoln Town Car for state Sen. Larry Young, and the senator never reported the transaction to state and legislative ethics panels.Young, who chairs a powerful health subcommittee, received the car courtesy of Willie Runyon, owner of American Ambulance & Oxygen Service, which collects hundreds of thousands of dollars each year in state Medicaid payments.Runyon said in an interview this week that he provided Young with the Lincoln Town Car EX while the senator was working for him two years ago. He said the car was part of Young's compensation and that the senator used it to conduct business for the ambulance company.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | July 20, 1995
William L. Jews, the head of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland, sold his Lutherville home for $379,000 in cash last spring to the president of a Baltimore ambulance company that does business with the not-for-profit insurer.Mr. Jews sold his property to Willie Runyon, a longtime friend who owns American Ambulance and Oxygen Service Co., after attempting to sell the home for about a year.Mr. Runyon offered to buy the house March 17, nine days after Mr. Jews submitted a contract to buy a $1.1 million home on the southern fringe of Green Spring Valley, records show.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Thomas W. Waldron and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writers | March 12, 1995
State Sen. Larry Young chairs a powerful subcommittee that molds legislation worth millions of dollars to hospitals, health insurers and nursing homes.Yet at the same time, Mr. Young has significant financial ties to those interests that pose potential ethical conflicts. For example:* He is a top aide to the owner of one of the largest private ambulance companies in the state. In that capacity, Mr. Young routinely solicits business from the same health-care enterprises whose fortunes he helps to decide in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1999
Former state Sen. Larry Young, accused of accepting $72,000 in bribes from a Prince George's County health care company, also got a $39,000 severance payment, a half-dozen free trips and a pricey Lincoln Town Car from a Baltimore ambulance company after resigning his job there, jurors were told yesterday.Prosecutors used the disclosure of additional payments to Young by American Ambulance and Oxygen Co. in an effort to show to a pattern of conduct by the former legislator.In the bribery and extortion case before an Anne Arundel County jury, prosecutors say Young tore up a contract with the Prince George's health care company to give the appearance he was uninvolved, yet he continued to demand cash.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Michael Dresser and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2000
In what his lawyers are calling "some final housecleaning," former state Sen. Larry Young has paid a $2,250 fee, accepted a formal reprimand and admitted he filed incomplete financial disclosure statements over his last four years as a legislator. Young, in five amended reports to the state Ethics Commission, for the first time acknowledged receiving money or gifts from several entities with business interests before the General Assembly. That conduct led to his expulsion from the Senate three years ago. The amended reports were made public yesterday as part of a settlement ending the commission's 3-year-old investigation of the West Baltimore Democrat.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Richard Irwin and Bruce Reid and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1995
Two men were killed and one injured last night when a gunman fired a dozen or more shots in the 1800 block of Hope St. in East Baltimore, police said.Sgt. Mark Tomlin of the city homicide squad said investigators knew of no motive for the shooting, which occurred about 10 p.m. He said the gunman, who fled, used a semiautomatic handgun.Names of the victims were not available. Police said one of the men died at the scene, south of North Avenue on Hope Street, and another died en route to Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1999
Former state Sen. Larry Young, accused of accepting $72,000 in bribes from a Prince George's County health care company, also got a $39,000 severance payment, a half-dozen free trips and a pricey Lincoln Town Car from a Baltimore ambulance company after resigning his job there, jurors were told yesterday.Prosecutors used the disclosure of additional payments to Young by American Ambulance and Oxygen Co. in an effort to show to a pattern of conduct by the former legislator.In the bribery and extortion case before an Anne Arundel County jury, prosecutors say Young tore up a contract with the Prince George's health care company to give the appearance he was uninvolved, yet he continued to demand cash.
NEWS
February 1, 1998
What about gifts given to Glendening?I have been for many years a practicing attorney in Maryland. I also happen to be a Republican by persuasion and political registration. I have followed the Larry Young investigation with great interest.I believe that Mr. Young has a legitimate point when he says he was discriminated against in connection with his expulsion from the state Senate. Do not get me wrong. I am not defending Mr. Young. I am just agreeing that he has a point concerning discrimination.
NEWS
By SCOTT HIGHAM, WALTER F. ROCHE JR., AND WILLIAM F. ZORZI JR. and SCOTT HIGHAM, WALTER F. ROCHE JR., AND WILLIAM F. ZORZI JR.,SUN STAFF Sun news researcher Dee Lyons contributed to this article | December 20, 1997
The chief of a Baltimore ambulance company bought a $24,800 luxury Lincoln Town Car for state Sen. Larry Young, and the senator never reported the transaction to state and legislative ethics panels.Young, who chairs a powerful health subcommittee, received the car courtesy of Willie Runyon, owner of American Ambulance & Oxygen Service, which collects hundreds of thousands of dollars each year in state Medicaid payments.Runyon said in an interview this week that he provided Young with the Lincoln Town Car EX while the senator was working for him two years ago. He said the car was part of Young's compensation and that the senator used it to conduct business for the ambulance company.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
The ambulance company owned by a Baltimore businessman who is a major contributor to Democratic campaigns has agreed to pay $1.475 million to resolve allegations it improperly billed Medicare and Medicaid for ambulance trips to doctors' offices, the U.S. attorney said yesterday.American Ambulance and Oxygen Co., which is owned by Willie Runyon, a political fund-raiser at the local, state and federal levels, acknowledged its submission of claims was not consistent with Medicare reimbursement policy, but otherwise denied the allegations and disputes that its claims were improper.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Richard Irwin and Bruce Reid and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1995
Two men were killed and one injured last night when a gunman fired a dozen or more shots in the 1800 block of Hope St. in East Baltimore, police said.Sgt. Mark Tomlin of the city homicide squad said investigators knew of no motive for the shooting, which occurred about 10 p.m. He said the gunman, who fled, used a semiautomatic handgun.Names of the victims were not available. Police said one of the men died at the scene, south of North Avenue on Hope Street, and another died en route to Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1995
A politically connected Baltimore businessman says he is no longer in violation of state campaign finance laws.Willie Runyon and his American Ambulance and Oxygen Service had together contributed about $17,000 over the legal limit to various candidates in the 1994 election, according to records released by Mr. Runyon's lawyer this week.But the records also show that Mr. Runyon and American Ambulance have since obtained refunds in that amount from the candidates, putting him and the company at or below the legal limit.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | February 26, 1995
After it was disclosed that Baltimore ambulance company owner Willie Runyon, his daughter and his company gave $95,000 to Gov. Parris N. Glendening's legal defense fund, the governor said the gift created no ethical conflict because Mr. Runyon did no direct business with the state.But Mr. Runyon's flagship company, American Ambulance and Oxygen Service Inc., does in fact have significant interaction with state government.His ambulances are licensed, regulated and inspected by state officials.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
Willie Runyon, the owner of a private ambulance company in Baltimore and a major financial contributor to Democrats from City Hall to the White House, died Thursday of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 76.Mr. Runyon, the son of a West Virginia coal miner who owned American Ambulance and Oxygen Service Co., died in Brightwood Nursing Home in Lutherville, said his wife, Patricia Runyon.Among recipients of Mr. Runyon's largess during the past 30 years were Govs. Marvin Mandel, William Donald Schaefer and Parris N. Glendening, and the Clinton-Gore re-election campaign.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | July 20, 1995
William L. Jews, the head of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland, sold his Lutherville home for $379,000 in cash last spring to the president of a Baltimore ambulance company that does business with the not-for-profit insurer.Mr. Jews sold his property to Willie Runyon, a longtime friend who owns American Ambulance and Oxygen Service Co., after attempting to sell the home for about a year.Mr. Runyon offered to buy the house March 17, nine days after Mr. Jews submitted a contract to buy a $1.1 million home on the southern fringe of Green Spring Valley, records show.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | April 9, 1995
Spiro T. Agnew, a native son whose success should have been a source of lasting pride, left the nation's second-highest office in 1973 without contesting charges that he had taken kickbacks when he was Maryland's governor.At about the same time, Baltimore County Executive Dale Anderson served 13 months in jail after being convicted on federal corruption charges.And troubling questions were raised about the linkage between campaign contributions and government contracts.Stung by the conclusion that government was for sale in Maryland, the General Assembly acted in 1974 to require corporations doing business with the state to disclose annually the dollar value of their contracts and all campaign contributions made by their corporate officers.
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