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By Dallas Morning News | August 10, 1994
DALLAS -- American Airlines Inc. and its parent, AMR Corp., are considering another round of management and professional layoffs later this year, with cuts of 20 percent or more under discussion.People inside and outside the company said managers have been told to expect further job cuts as part of the airline's plan to pull out of nonprofitable markets and reduce overall costs. While final numbers haven't been determined, several people have said figures of up to 30 percent have been discussed.
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NEWS
March 1, 2014
Just when I think nothing else outrageous can be done in the name of religious freedom, along comes the Arizona bill allowing business owners the legal right to refuse service to gays and others on the basis of said freedom. That Gov. Jan Brewer publicly announced her veto of the legislation on television shows her concern over the national fallout ( "Boycott Arizona," Feb. 27). But the fact remains that it was approved by the Republican-dominated legislature and did reach the governor's desk and that is the scary part of this issue.
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BUSINESS
By Evan Ramstad and Evan Ramstad,AP Business Writer | January 15, 1992
DALLAS -- American Airlines' parent company, AMR Corp., said today it lost $124.9 million in the final three months of 1991 and a staggering $239.9 million for the whole year.The annual loss was the airline's worst ever.The company blamed the performance on the recession, which has weakened demand for air travel, higher costs and fare discounting. In addition, AMR took a $59.6 million charge in the fourth quarter to cover the retiring of several aircraft."The best thing you can say about last year is that it's over," AMR Chairman Robert Crandall said in a statement.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
This past week, the Department of Justice sued to stop the merger between US Airways and American Airlines ( "Where was DOJ in Southwest - AirTran merger?" Aug. 15). One reason for the department's actions is because the merger would reduce competition at Washington's Ronald Reagan National Airport, where the combined airline would control 69 percent of the flights. At BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, Southwest Airlines, which acquired AirTran Airways in 2011, has a combined market share of roughly 70 percent.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 11, 1993
GALVESTON, Texas -- After an intense four-week trial, jurors decided in less than four hours yesterday that American Airlines did not try to drive weaker competitors out of business with "predatory" prices during the air fare war last summer.Lawyers for Continental Airlines and Northwest Airlines, which brought the suit, said they might appeal the verdict. But the swiftness of the decision and the fact that the jury did not believe that American Airlines intended to monopolize markets with its revamped fares could make a successful appeal difficult, they said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 1999
MIAMI -- The smugglers moved with ease through Miami International Airport and made their way onto American Airlines planes parked at the gates, stashing heroin in coffee containers in the planes' galleys and hiding cocaine and marijuana in suitcases in the baggage holds, a federal indictment filed yesterday charged.Once, they agreed to stash three hand grenades in carry-on baggage.As they went about their illegal business, in plain sight of passengers and airport security officers, federal investigators said, the smugglers did not worry about being caught by the airline.
BUSINESS
By Jim Fuquay and Jim Fuquay,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | February 15, 1992
A months-long dispute between a prominent Dallas banker and American Airlines has erupted into public view with the criminal indictment of William E. Gibson, former chief economist to RepublicBank Corp. and a member of the Council of Economic Advisers in the Nixon administration.Mr. Gibson, 47, a member of American's elite frequent-flier club, was charged this week with defrauding American of more than $200,000 in money and services with what American calls a sophisticated ticket scam.He also was charged by a Dallas grand jury with one count of bank fraud, in which the government alleges he filed $43,000 in false expense reports to American Federal Bank FSB, where he was president from 1988 to 1990.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF Bloomberg News contributed to this story | May 30, 1997
American Airlines said yesterday that it will buy Shuttle Inc., the commuter service between New York's LaGuardia Airport and both Boston and Washington National, if US Airways fails to exercise its option to purchase the operation.Shuttle Inc., formerly the Trump Shuttle, has been owned since 1992 by a consortium of lenders but managed by US Airways, which holds a 47 percent equity stake in the Shuttle.US Airways officials say they want to purchase the shuttle but first must secure cost-cutting concessions from their labor unions.
BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 27, 1992
SAN FRANCISCO -- You may not get much sympathy for American Airlines' $166 million second-quarter loss from travel managers who work for big corporations and consider themselves among the airline industry's best customers.Many of the travel managers have been in a snit since April when American revamped its fare structure in an effort to simplify it, and in the process eliminated most of the volume discounts it had been giving large corporate customers. Most other major carriers followed American's lead.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 8, 1998
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- British Airways Plc and American Airlines will be told today what concessions European regulators require before allowing the airlines to implement a proposed partnership that would unite their flights and fares across the Atlantic.AMR Corp.'s American, the largest U.S. airline by revenues, and BA, Europe's biggest airline, have been struggling for two years to win clearance for a merger of marketing, frequent-flier plans and a host of other activities that would make the two carriers appear as one to passengers.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Joe Datsko was an admitted workaholic for the first 25 years of a 47-year career as a mechanical engineering professor at the University of Michigan. Datsko likes to say that until he was in his early 50s "most of my exercise was writing on a blackboard. " That changed in the early 1970s when the younger of Datsko's two sons - he also has three daughters - was invited to the 1972 U.S. Olympic trials in cycling. Robert Datsko, who was in high school at the time, failed to secure one of the 12 spots, finishing in the top third of the 66-person field.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | May 17, 2013
As you shop for airfare for your summer vacation, don't overlook the cost of fees for bags or changing a reservation that can add quite a bit to your travel bill. Airlines collected a record $6.1 billion last year in these fees, according to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. That could be because fees are rising as well as more people are flying, said George Hobica, founder of Airfarewatchdog.com, which publishes a list of airline charges. Fees continue to rise this year, with some airlines recently increasing the cost to change a reservation from $150 to $200.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
Last year, Jane Kuhl and her husband qualified for a state-run program that promised a 50 percent rebate to homeowners installing energy-saving insulation. The couple spent more than $6,700 plugging holes and insulating their Harford County farmhouse, which was originally built in the late 1800s. For their work, they received a 35 percent rebate from the state, along with a 15 percent rebate from their utility. Happy at first, they were later surprised and disappointed to find out that they owe income taxes on the $2,461 received from the state.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2011
Note to airlines: Can you please stop kicking celebrities off your planes? Alec Baldwin is the latest in a string of high-profile kerfuffles based on what to me - person who was not there - seems some very thin reasoning . And then there's: -Country singer John Rich for allegedly being drunk on a 10:50 a.m. Southwest flight from Las Vegas to Nashville. -Actress Leisha Hailey and her lesbian lover tossed off Southwest for kissing or cussing, depending on who you believe.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2011
The number of passengers flying through Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport rose 4.7 percent in 2010 to 21.9 million, setting an annual record, Gov. Martin O'Malley said Monday. BWI Marshall has seen consistent growth in numbers of passengers since spring 2009. The airport had set eight consecutive monthly records as of December. Last year's passenger count broke the previous annual record of 21 million passengers in 2007. Southwest Airlines, the airport's leading carrier, served more than 11.7 million passengers in 2010, a 7.4 percent increase over 2009.
NEWS
By Julie Johnsson, Tribune Newspapers | April 18, 2010
Every airline passenger is entitled to overhead space, right? Wrong. On a typical domestic flight, six passengers share luggage bins that fit four wheelie bags, at most, leaving some fliers out of luck at a time when more of them are opting to lug their bags, rather than check them, to avoid airline fees. There are also more passengers competing for that space because planes are again filled to near-record levels, the result of carriers' capacity cuts and a rebound from last year's recession.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 7, 1999
MIAMI -- Federal charges are expected within days against American Airlines, accusing Miami's No. 1 air carrier of endangering passengers by mishandling hazardous cargo and carrying it illegally on its jets.It could be the first time in aviation history that a major airline is charged criminally for transporting hazardous materials.Combustibles, pesticides, corrosives and other substances -- such as cases of flammable perfumes and dangerous hair spray canisters -- are some of the materials that have been loaded improperly, according to federal sources close to the case.
TRAVEL
January 17, 2010
Major airlines raised baggage fees and fuel surcharges last week as the industry, which has been hit hard by the recession-caused downturn in travel, attempts to improve the bottom line. United Airlines joined the latest round of increases to baggage fees, following recent moves by Delta and Continental. United will now charge $25 to check the first bag and $35 for the second. That's $5 more than before. The increase took effect on tickets bought beginning Jan. 14 for travel after Jan. 21. The new fees are the same at Continental and Delta.
NEWS
December 29, 2009
W hen a prominent Nigerian banker goes so far as to phone an American embassy in October and warn officials about his son's radical views, his disappearance and travel to Yemen, one might assume that U.S. officials would, at minimum, put the young man's name on the no-fly list and revoke his visa. But as has become clear since 23-year-old Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab was arrested after his alleged attempt to blow up a passenger jet headed to Detroit on Christmas day, that didn't happen.
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