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By Patrick Soran and Dan Klinglesmith and Patrick Soran and Dan Klinglesmith,Contributing Writers | July 4, 1993
Surely, it's the most remarkable excursion to Pikes Peak since Zebulon Pike himself spotted the snow-draped massif in 1807. On July 22, 1893 -- 100 years ago this month -- Katherine Lee Bates, a Massachusetts English teacher, boarded a covered wagon for a sightseeing trip up the 14,110-foot mountain. She came back with two lines of poetry spinning in her head: O beautiful for spacious skies, For amber waves of grain. It's a Colorado souvenir the entire nation now enjoys.Poetry was her passion.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2005
Long before 9/11, before war, before yellow ribbons that say "Support Our Troops," and long before red and blue states, the theme for the 2005 Philadelphia Flower Show was chosen. It would be "America the Beautiful," and the patriotic theme would be played out in flowers of red, white and blue. The Philadelphia Flower Show, March 6 to 13 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, is the granddaddy of all flower shows. Now in its 176th year, it is unmatched in longevity, scale, perfection and creativity, and it is such a monumental undertaking that planning begins at least five years in advance.
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 19, 2001
BOSTON -- Have you noticed anything missing from the chorus of patriotism that has risen from the ashes of Sept. 11? A star, perhaps? A spangle? A banner? In all the spontaneous singing that has turned a citizenry into a civic choir, the one song ordinary folks aren't singing much is the national anthem. That's because they can't sing it. This is not a musical news bulletin. Before "The Star-Spangled Banner" was officially adopted by Congress in 1931, someone complained to the New York Times that the song was a "heaven-piercing abomination.
NEWS
September 14, 2004
TODAY'S THE BIRTHDAY of a song that's been buffeted almost as badly as the flag that inspired it, and the city in which it is set. "The Star-Spangled Banner" is Baltimore's gift to the nation, and 190 years after it was written we've still got ingrates who would rather have some other anthem. Let them go where the British Gen. Robert Ross went. Before commencing the battle of North Point, he declared that he would dine that night in Baltimore or in hell, and he never made it to Baltimore, because he was shot dead; that left the second option.
NEWS
October 27, 2001
Current anthem is right banner for this nation In her column "Let's dump `Banner' for `Beautiful'" (Opinion*Commentary, Oct. 19) Ellen Goodman proposes that we officially replace "The Star-Spangled Banner" with "America the Beautiful." I could not disagree more. As a Maryland native, I am certainly biased, since the national anthem was written here. But I feel there is another strong reason not to adopt "America the Beautiful" - the fact that it invokes God to do certain things for our country, such as "shed His grace on thee."
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2005
Long before 9/11, before war, before yellow ribbons that say "Support Our Troops," and long before red and blue states, the theme for the 2005 Philadelphia Flower Show was chosen. It would be "America the Beautiful," and the patriotic theme would be played out in flowers of red, white and blue. The Philadelphia Flower Show, March 6 to 13 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, is the granddaddy of all flower shows. Now in its 176th year, it is unmatched in longevity, scale, perfection and creativity, and it is such a monumental undertaking that planning begins at least five years in advance.
FEATURES
By Jean Thompson | December 30, 1990
From sea to shining sea, no two diners will agree if asked to name a food that is most typically American. Roast turkey or apple pie, maybe. Corn fritters or even crab cakes might qualify. No matter what's named the "in" or "out" foods for 1991, most cooks will choose the handed-down-by-relatives recipes of family and regional tradition.American cuisine challenges those who would define it. When Phillip Stephen Schulz set out to capture it for his latest cookbook, "America the Beautiful: Authentic Recipes From Across America" (Collins Publishers, $50)
NEWS
September 14, 2004
TODAY'S THE BIRTHDAY of a song that's been buffeted almost as badly as the flag that inspired it, and the city in which it is set. "The Star-Spangled Banner" is Baltimore's gift to the nation, and 190 years after it was written we've still got ingrates who would rather have some other anthem. Let them go where the British Gen. Robert Ross went. Before commencing the battle of North Point, he declared that he would dine that night in Baltimore or in hell, and he never made it to Baltimore, because he was shot dead; that left the second option.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | December 1, 1991
Washington. -- In the hectic year of 1974, when Ted Agnew was out but Dick Nixon was still in, the venerable Gridiron Club of Washington satirized the domestic climate of the time with words sung to the tune of "America the Beautiful":Oh beautiful for Tel & Tel,Du Pont and Sperry Rand,For U.S. Steel and HoneywellAnd Continental Can;American Cyanamid,Three-M and A&PAnd Standard Brands and Ho-Jo standsFrom sea to shining sea!The kicker paid tribute to the man of the hour, whom everyone suspected would be president soon:Americard and Diner's Club,Sears and Montgomery Ward,And Pontiac and CadillacAnd good old Jerry Ford!
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 19, 2001
The return to what now passes for normality began at the Kennedy Center one day after the terror. Night lights from the rescue and recovery efforts under way at the Pentagon a short distance away on the other side of the Potomac could be seen from the center's promenade, its fountains running almost in defiance. Inside, the Washington Opera resumed its 46th season as scheduled with the second of 10 performances of Offenbach's The Tales of Hoffmann, followed the next night by the opening of Mozart's Cosi fan tutte.
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 11, 2004
Ray Charles may have been one of the most influential singer-musicians ever to grace American pop music. He may have laid the foundation for soul - an earthy blend of the secular and the spiritual, and one of the country's greatest cultural achievements. But during a career of more than 50 years, the legendary Georgia native was affectionately known to friends, fans and industry insiders as Brother Ray, a man with a sharp sense of humor and fiercely independent spirit. Mr. Charles, whose classic hits include "Hit the Road Jack" and "What'd I Say," died yesterday of acute liver disease at his Beverly Hills home.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 2002
The composer and music critic Virgil Thomson wasn't merely being flip when he said, "The way to write American music is simple. All you have to do is be an American and then write any kind of music you wish." From the homespun hymns that entered the 18th century Psalter, to Appalachian folk songs, to African-American spirituals, jazz, Broadway, Tin Pan Alley and formidable symphonists such as Aaron Copland and Charles Ives, our music has been as eclectic a national statement as one could imagine.
NEWS
October 27, 2001
Current anthem is right banner for this nation In her column "Let's dump `Banner' for `Beautiful'" (Opinion*Commentary, Oct. 19) Ellen Goodman proposes that we officially replace "The Star-Spangled Banner" with "America the Beautiful." I could not disagree more. As a Maryland native, I am certainly biased, since the national anthem was written here. But I feel there is another strong reason not to adopt "America the Beautiful" - the fact that it invokes God to do certain things for our country, such as "shed His grace on thee."
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 19, 2001
BOSTON -- Have you noticed anything missing from the chorus of patriotism that has risen from the ashes of Sept. 11? A star, perhaps? A spangle? A banner? In all the spontaneous singing that has turned a citizenry into a civic choir, the one song ordinary folks aren't singing much is the national anthem. That's because they can't sing it. This is not a musical news bulletin. Before "The Star-Spangled Banner" was officially adopted by Congress in 1931, someone complained to the New York Times that the song was a "heaven-piercing abomination.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 19, 2001
The return to what now passes for normality began at the Kennedy Center one day after the terror. Night lights from the rescue and recovery efforts under way at the Pentagon a short distance away on the other side of the Potomac could be seen from the center's promenade, its fountains running almost in defiance. Inside, the Washington Opera resumed its 46th season as scheduled with the second of 10 performances of Offenbach's The Tales of Hoffmann, followed the next night by the opening of Mozart's Cosi fan tutte.
FEATURES
By Patrick Soran and Dan Klinglesmith and Patrick Soran and Dan Klinglesmith,Contributing Writers | July 4, 1993
Surely, it's the most remarkable excursion to Pikes Peak since Zebulon Pike himself spotted the snow-draped massif in 1807. On July 22, 1893 -- 100 years ago this month -- Katherine Lee Bates, a Massachusetts English teacher, boarded a covered wagon for a sightseeing trip up the 14,110-foot mountain. She came back with two lines of poetry spinning in her head: O beautiful for spacious skies, For amber waves of grain. It's a Colorado souvenir the entire nation now enjoys.Poetry was her passion.
NEWS
July 16, 1991
Despite flaws, America still best of nationsRobin J. Holt (Other Voices, July 2) blames America for the deplorable state of Middle East affairs, and states that America lacks concern for the health care of its citizens, educational quality, care of its children, teen-age pregnancy, infant mortality and childhood malnutrition.Mr. Holt's statements are without authority. They are misrepresentations and outright prevarications.He also decries the state of civil liberties in America and recent Supreme Court decisions that permit certain police actions to combat heinous crime conditions that prior Supreme Court decisions nurtured.
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 11, 2004
Ray Charles may have been one of the most influential singer-musicians ever to grace American pop music. He may have laid the foundation for soul - an earthy blend of the secular and the spiritual, and one of the country's greatest cultural achievements. But during a career of more than 50 years, the legendary Georgia native was affectionately known to friends, fans and industry insiders as Brother Ray, a man with a sharp sense of humor and fiercely independent spirit. Mr. Charles, whose classic hits include "Hit the Road Jack" and "What'd I Say," died yesterday of acute liver disease at his Beverly Hills home.
FEATURES
By GINA CARUSO | December 13, 1992
None of Peggy J. Winters' paintings are displayed in her suburban living room. There's only an unremarkable oil painting of a landscape and it is not her own. The watercolorist's paintings are stored elsewhere in the event that neighbors happen by -- she doesn't want to take a chance on offending her guests."
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | December 1, 1991
Washington. -- In the hectic year of 1974, when Ted Agnew was out but Dick Nixon was still in, the venerable Gridiron Club of Washington satirized the domestic climate of the time with words sung to the tune of "America the Beautiful":Oh beautiful for Tel & Tel,Du Pont and Sperry Rand,For U.S. Steel and HoneywellAnd Continental Can;American Cyanamid,Three-M and A&PAnd Standard Brands and Ho-Jo standsFrom sea to shining sea!The kicker paid tribute to the man of the hour, whom everyone suspected would be president soon:Americard and Diner's Club,Sears and Montgomery Ward,And Pontiac and CadillacAnd good old Jerry Ford!
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