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America S Children

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By Jonathan Freedman | June 27, 1994
THE ECONOMIC indicators that steer our market economy are relentlessly driving America's children into poverty. Yet there is no statistical gauge of our children's well-being -- no Dow Jones average -- that might guide economic decisions.To see how the current economic thinking, which prizes low inflation, has affected children, compare their fortunes with the stock market's. Between 1980 and 1992, the Dow Jones average soared to record highs (despite the 1987 crash) while the number of children below the poverty line grew by 26 percent.
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NEWS
By Paul Wellstone | August 10, 1999
IN EARLY July, President Clinton visited some of the poorest regions of the country and, to bipartisan acclaim, spoke eloquently of our obligations to America's most disadvantaged children. Now, with the U.S. economy performing at its peak, we have an unprecedented opportunity to back up our words with actions.As Congress begins making critical decisions on budget priorities for decades to come, there is no better time than now to demonstrate the depth of our commitment to America's children, especially the poorest among them.
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NEWS
December 28, 1992
Immunizations represent one of the simplest and mos cost-effective of all public health measures. Especially for children, for whom a measles, rubella or smallpox vaccination can mean the difference between life and death, immunization rates also say a lot about a country's standard of living -- and about the priority that the country places on its most precious natural resource. According to two reports issued earlier this month, the United States has little reason for pride in its recent record of caring for the health of its children.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Early Monday morning The Mall by the Lincoln Memorial is as quiet as dawn. The only signs of life are runners in knee braces and families of adolescent ducklings along the edge of the Reflecting Pool.There are few reminders of the event that brought a quarter-million folks to this site Saturday to pay the rare currency of attention to America's children. The only leftovers are some food wrappers and rows of portable toilets waiting to be removed.On the ground is one hand-painted yellow banner -- ''Stand for Children'' -- that bears the autographs of the kids who came to carry it. They too have come and gone.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS W. NELSON | April 21, 1992
This year's recession hit a lot of Americans. But while most of us are waiting out a temporary slump, America's children have been in a decade-long depression. The children of 1992 lead less healthy, more dangerous and poorer lives than the children of 1980.Over the past decade, America worsened in six key indicators of child well-being. The rate of babies born at lower birth weight is 3 percent higher today than it was in 1980. The rate of births to single teen-agers is 14 percent higher.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Children's Defense Fund called on White House and congressional leaders yesterday to put the same effort into rescuing the 12.6 million U.S. children living in poverty that they put into liberating Kuwait."
NEWS
By Paul Wellstone | August 10, 1999
IN EARLY July, President Clinton visited some of the poorest regions of the country and, to bipartisan acclaim, spoke eloquently of our obligations to America's most disadvantaged children. Now, with the U.S. economy performing at its peak, we have an unprecedented opportunity to back up our words with actions.As Congress begins making critical decisions on budget priorities for decades to come, there is no better time than now to demonstrate the depth of our commitment to America's children, especially the poorest among them.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Early Monday morning The Mall by the Lincoln Memorial is as quiet as dawn. The only signs of life are runners in knee braces and families of adolescent ducklings along the edge of the Reflecting Pool.There are few reminders of the event that brought a quarter-million folks to this site Saturday to pay the rare currency of attention to America's children. The only leftovers are some food wrappers and rows of portable toilets waiting to be removed.On the ground is one hand-painted yellow banner -- ''Stand for Children'' -- that bears the autographs of the kids who came to carry it. They too have come and gone.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1996
After years of slogging, one foot in front of the other, to make life better for America's children, Marian Wright Edelman has given up on small steps.Only a huge, daring leap can improve their diminishing prospects, says Edelman, founder of the Children's Defense Fund. She plans to make that leap Saturday with a march on Washington called "Stand for Children."Edelman is summoning hundreds of thousands of children and adults to the Lincoln Memorial on Saturday to do for children what the 1963 march on Washington did for civil rights or what Earth Day did for the environment.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | April 18, 1994
THE evidence continues to mount that the "Me" generation is sorely neglecting its children.The Carnegie Corporation of New York has released a new study analyzing a variety of data about how children are faring in this country -- and concludes that unless serious reform begins now, the outlook is bleak, not just for these children but for society as a whole.In 1960, just 5 percent of children in America were born to unmarried mothers. By 1990, that figure had jumped to 28 percent. Only 7 percent of youngsters under the age of 3 lived with one parent in 1960.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1996
After years of slogging, one foot in front of the other, to make life better for America's children, Marian Wright Edelman has given up on small steps.Only a huge, daring leap can improve their diminishing prospects, says Edelman, founder of the Children's Defense Fund. She plans to make that leap Saturday with a march on Washington called "Stand for Children."Edelman is summoning hundreds of thousands of children and adults to the Lincoln Memorial on Saturday to do for children what the 1963 march on Washington did for civil rights or what Earth Day did for the environment.
NEWS
By Jonathan Freedman | June 27, 1994
THE ECONOMIC indicators that steer our market economy are relentlessly driving America's children into poverty. Yet there is no statistical gauge of our children's well-being -- no Dow Jones average -- that might guide economic decisions.To see how the current economic thinking, which prizes low inflation, has affected children, compare their fortunes with the stock market's. Between 1980 and 1992, the Dow Jones average soared to record highs (despite the 1987 crash) while the number of children below the poverty line grew by 26 percent.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | April 18, 1994
THE evidence continues to mount that the "Me" generation is sorely neglecting its children.The Carnegie Corporation of New York has released a new study analyzing a variety of data about how children are faring in this country -- and concludes that unless serious reform begins now, the outlook is bleak, not just for these children but for society as a whole.In 1960, just 5 percent of children in America were born to unmarried mothers. By 1990, that figure had jumped to 28 percent. Only 7 percent of youngsters under the age of 3 lived with one parent in 1960.
NEWS
December 28, 1992
Immunizations represent one of the simplest and mos cost-effective of all public health measures. Especially for children, for whom a measles, rubella or smallpox vaccination can mean the difference between life and death, immunization rates also say a lot about a country's standard of living -- and about the priority that the country places on its most precious natural resource. According to two reports issued earlier this month, the United States has little reason for pride in its recent record of caring for the health of its children.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Glenn McNatt is a Baltimore Sun editorial writer | May 26, 1992
Do we really need a serious discussion this election year about the plight of families in America and what government can do to support and strengthen them? You bet we do.It's a subject that has been ignored for the past 12 years by three successive Republican administrations. The consequences of that neglect for America's children have been profound.Yet it's also a subject that doesn't seem to interest Vice President Quayle much. He would rather prattle on about TV sitcom characters who have babies out of wedlock and who "mock the importance of fathers."
NEWS
By DOUGLAS W. NELSON | April 21, 1992
This year's recession hit a lot of Americans. But while most of us are waiting out a temporary slump, America's children have been in a decade-long depression. The children of 1992 lead less healthy, more dangerous and poorer lives than the children of 1980.Over the past decade, America worsened in six key indicators of child well-being. The rate of babies born at lower birth weight is 3 percent higher today than it was in 1980. The rate of births to single teen-agers is 14 percent higher.
NEWS
By SYLVIA ANN HEWLETT | July 7, 1991
Across the face of America, children are failing to flourish. Rich kids, middle-class kids, poor kids -- all deal with risk and neglect on a scale unimagined in previous generations.Consider the following facts:* 20 percent of all children are growing up in poverty, a 21 percent increase since 1970.* 12 million children lack basic health insurance coverage.* 15 million children have been abandoned by their fathers.* The rate of suicide among adolescents has tripled over the last twenty years.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Glenn McNatt is a Baltimore Sun editorial writer | May 26, 1992
Do we really need a serious discussion this election year about the plight of families in America and what government can do to support and strengthen them? You bet we do.It's a subject that has been ignored for the past 12 years by three successive Republican administrations. The consequences of that neglect for America's children have been profound.Yet it's also a subject that doesn't seem to interest Vice President Quayle much. He would rather prattle on about TV sitcom characters who have babies out of wedlock and who "mock the importance of fathers."
NEWS
By SYLVIA ANN HEWLETT | July 7, 1991
Across the face of America, children are failing to flourish. Rich kids, middle-class kids, poor kids -- all deal with risk and neglect on a scale unimagined in previous generations.Consider the following facts:* 20 percent of all children are growing up in poverty, a 21 percent increase since 1970.* 12 million children lack basic health insurance coverage.* 15 million children have been abandoned by their fathers.* The rate of suicide among adolescents has tripled over the last twenty years.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Children's Defense Fund called on White House and congressional leaders yesterday to put the same effort into rescuing the 12.6 million U.S. children living in poverty that they put into liberating Kuwait."
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