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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2002
MIAMI -- Before the restart of the Volvo Ocean Race, skippers and crew talked about the tricky conditions that awaited them up the East Coast and the Chesapeake Bay. They were jumping the gun -- literally. In a bizarre start off the coast of Miami Beach yesterday afternoon, six of the eight boats dashed across the start line ahead of the gun and had to circle back to try again. Only Amer Sports Too, the all-woman boat, and ASSA ABLOY managed to get away cleanly on the three-day, 875-mile run up to Baltimore.
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SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 10, 2002
For illbruck Challenge, 4 1/2 years of planning and 8 1/2 months of sailing round the world ultimately produced a tactical advantage second to none in the Volvo Ocean Race. American skipper John Kostecki led his German-backed boat to overall victory yesterday as the 32,700-nautical-mile odyssey ended late yesterday afternoon in Kiel, Germany. Though finishing second in the ninth and final leg behind Norway's djuice dragons, illbruck became the first German boat to win in the 29-year history of the round-the-world event, formerly known as The Whitbread.
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SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 3, 2002
Amer Sports Too retired from Leg 7 of the Volvo Ocean Race yesterday after it was dismasted Wednesday en route to LaRochelle, France. The all-woman crew aboard the second entry of Nautor Sports decided to motor to Halifax, Nova Scotia, rather than try to sail the remaining 2,500 nautical miles to France by jury-rigging what remains of the mast. Amer Sports Too left Annapolis on Sunday on the 3,400-mile leg with seven other Volvo boats. Skipper Lisa McDonald told Volvo headquarters yesterday that she and her crew were 250 miles southeast of Halifax and that they expect to arrive there sometime tonight or tomorrow.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 10, 2002
Illbruck Challenge, a claim check for a 24-hour speed record in its pocket, sailed into La Rochelle, France, yesterday two days ahead of schedule, to win Leg 7 of the Volvo Ocean Race. The German entry, skippered by John Kostecki, arrived 10 days, 20 hours and 44 minutes after leaving Annapolis on the 3,400-nautical-mile leg. Sweden's ASSA ABLOY, the fleet's most consistent performer the past five legs, was second into La Rochelle, less than three hours behind. Bermuda's Team Tyco finished third, 40 minutes later.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 10, 2002
For illbruck Challenge, 4 1/2 years of planning and 8 1/2 months of sailing round the world ultimately produced a tactical advantage second to none in the Volvo Ocean Race. American skipper John Kostecki led his German-backed boat to overall victory yesterday as the 32,700-nautical-mile odyssey ended late yesterday afternoon in Kiel, Germany. Though finishing second in the ninth and final leg behind Norway's djuice dragons, illbruck became the first German boat to win in the 29-year history of the round-the-world event, formerly known as The Whitbread.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
On a good day, the Chesapeake Bay can make a sailor's blood race and nerve endings tingle. For the eight boats competing in the Volvo Ocean Race, that day wasn't yesterday. After three days of sprinting up the East Coast from Miami, the 64-foot racing machines entered the bay with a little more than 100 miles to the finish line off Fort McHenry. There, the air went out of their sails and the salt water turned to molasses. What had been anticipated as a jubilant, champagne-filled ride into Baltimore at 9 p.m. turned into a late-night creep into the sleeping city.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2002
As they sail east from Annapolis toward France on Monday, the crew of the fleet leader in the Volvo Ocean Race will dine on a repast of roast turkey, mashed potatoes and cranberries. All served up in dog bowls. The meal is rehydrated turkey and slopped-over powdered potatoes dotted with Craisins, heated over a butane burner and served up in deep-dish plastic bowls normally suited for the family pet. All to keep the goop from sloshing out in rough seas. "Real elaborate, huh?" says Richard Clarke, a crewman aboard first-place illbruck Challenge.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Candus Thomson and Joel McCord and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2002
April is supposed to be one of the great months for sailing on the Chesapeake Bay. But don't try to tell that to the crews of the eight Volvo ocean racers that wallowed in glassy waters and fluky winds on their way to Baltimore on Leg 6 of the globe-girdling voyage. Race organizers had hoped for a happy-hour finish on Wednesday with crowds of spectators lining the Inner Harbor sea walls to celebrate the arrival of the 64-foot yachts. But it was about 2:10 a.m. yesterday when News Corp finally crossed the finish line off Fort McHenry.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2002
With one eye on the competition and the other watching the Gulf Stream, the skippers of the eight boats competing in the sixth leg of the Volvo Ocean Race are lining up for the final day's sailing into Baltimore. The end of the 875-mile leg from Miami can't come soon enough for the crews, which have spent much of the time changing sails to try to match fluky wind conditions. The race has three distinct groupings of boats: News Corp, illbruck Challenge, Amer Sports One and ASSA ABLOY in the lead group; Tyco, SEB and djuice dragons in the second; and the all-woman entry, Amer Sports Too, alone and far behind.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 10, 2002
Illbruck Challenge, a claim check for a 24-hour speed record in its pocket, sailed into La Rochelle, France, yesterday two days ahead of schedule, to win Leg 7 of the Volvo Ocean Race. The German entry, skippered by John Kostecki, arrived 10 days, 20 hours and 44 minutes after leaving Annapolis on the 3,400-nautical-mile leg. Sweden's ASSA ABLOY, the fleet's most consistent performer the past five legs, was second into La Rochelle, less than three hours behind. Bermuda's Team Tyco finished third, 40 minutes later.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 3, 2002
Amer Sports Too retired from Leg 7 of the Volvo Ocean Race yesterday after it was dismasted Wednesday en route to LaRochelle, France. The all-woman crew aboard the second entry of Nautor Sports decided to motor to Halifax, Nova Scotia, rather than try to sail the remaining 2,500 nautical miles to France by jury-rigging what remains of the mast. Amer Sports Too left Annapolis on Sunday on the 3,400-mile leg with seven other Volvo boats. Skipper Lisa McDonald told Volvo headquarters yesterday that she and her crew were 250 miles southeast of Halifax and that they expect to arrive there sometime tonight or tomorrow.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2002
As they sail east from Annapolis toward France on Monday, the crew of the fleet leader in the Volvo Ocean Race will dine on a repast of roast turkey, mashed potatoes and cranberries. All served up in dog bowls. The meal is rehydrated turkey and slopped-over powdered potatoes dotted with Craisins, heated over a butane burner and served up in deep-dish plastic bowls normally suited for the family pet. All to keep the goop from sloshing out in rough seas. "Real elaborate, huh?" says Richard Clarke, a crewman aboard first-place illbruck Challenge.
SPORTS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2002
For most of the crew members on the eight racing machines tied up at the Inner Harbor, Baltimore is just another stop in their round-the-world-voyage known as the Volvo Ocean Race. But for Annapolis-based sailors Chris Larson and Peter Pendleton, it is a homecoming. "It was such an exhilarating feeling to be sailing home," says Pendleton, watch captain on Amer Sports One. "When we crossed the line, I couldn't wait to get to the dock and see my wife and not go to a hotel, but go home. It was fantastic to be here."
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Candus Thomson and Joel McCord and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2002
April is supposed to be one of the great months for sailing on the Chesapeake Bay. But don't try to tell that to the crews of the eight Volvo ocean racers that wallowed in glassy waters and fluky winds on their way to Baltimore on Leg 6 of the globe-girdling voyage. Race organizers had hoped for a happy-hour finish on Wednesday with crowds of spectators lining the Inner Harbor sea walls to celebrate the arrival of the 64-foot yachts. But it was about 2:10 a.m. yesterday when News Corp finally crossed the finish line off Fort McHenry.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
On a good day, the Chesapeake Bay can make a sailor's blood race and nerve endings tingle. For the eight boats competing in the Volvo Ocean Race, that day wasn't yesterday. After three days of sprinting up the East Coast from Miami, the 64-foot racing machines entered the bay with a little more than 100 miles to the finish line off Fort McHenry. There, the air went out of their sails and the salt water turned to molasses. What had been anticipated as a jubilant, champagne-filled ride into Baltimore at 9 p.m. turned into a late-night creep into the sleeping city.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2002
With one eye on the competition and the other watching the Gulf Stream, the skippers of the eight boats competing in the sixth leg of the Volvo Ocean Race are lining up for the final day's sailing into Baltimore. The end of the 875-mile leg from Miami can't come soon enough for the crews, which have spent much of the time changing sails to try to match fluky wind conditions. The race has three distinct groupings of boats: News Corp, illbruck Challenge, Amer Sports One and ASSA ABLOY in the lead group; Tyco, SEB and djuice dragons in the second; and the all-woman entry, Amer Sports Too, alone and far behind.
SPORTS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2001
Frustrated by tactical errors that led to back-of-the-pack finishes on the first two legs of the Volvo Ocean Race, ASSA ABLOY has added Annapolis sailor Chris Larson to its crew for several of the remaining legs of the grueling, 32,700-nautical-mile around-the-world race. Larson, winner of the 1997 Rolex Yachtsman of the Year award, will be part of a tactical triumvirate that will include skipper Neal McDonald and helmsman-tactician Mark Rudiger on the blue and gold boat sponsored by the Swedish lock-manufacturing giant.
SPORTS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2002
For most of the crew members on the eight racing machines tied up at the Inner Harbor, Baltimore is just another stop in their round-the-world-voyage known as the Volvo Ocean Race. But for Annapolis-based sailors Chris Larson and Peter Pendleton, it is a homecoming. "It was such an exhilarating feeling to be sailing home," says Pendleton, watch captain on Amer Sports One. "When we crossed the line, I couldn't wait to get to the dock and see my wife and not go to a hotel, but go home. It was fantastic to be here."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2002
MIAMI -- Before the restart of the Volvo Ocean Race, skippers and crew talked about the tricky conditions that awaited them up the East Coast and the Chesapeake Bay. They were jumping the gun -- literally. In a bizarre start off the coast of Miami Beach yesterday afternoon, six of the eight boats dashed across the start line ahead of the gun and had to circle back to try again. Only Amer Sports Too, the all-woman boat, and ASSA ABLOY managed to get away cleanly on the three-day, 875-mile run up to Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2001
Frustrated by tactical errors that led to back-of-the-pack finishes on the first two legs of the Volvo Ocean Race, ASSA ABLOY has added Annapolis sailor Chris Larson to its crew for several of the remaining legs of the grueling, 32,700-nautical-mile around-the-world race. Larson, winner of the 1997 Rolex Yachtsman of the Year award, will be part of a tactical triumvirate that will include skipper Neal McDonald and helmsman-tactician Mark Rudiger on the blue and gold boat sponsored by the Swedish lock-manufacturing giant.
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