Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAmelia Earhart
IN THE NEWS

Amelia Earhart

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Given the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, there's an extra haunting quality to "Air Heart," an inventive and absorbing aerial stage work about aviator Amelia Earhart currently at Baltimore Theatre Project. Written and performed by Mara Neimanis, the one-hour piece addresses the joy of flight, the curse of celebrity, and much more as it seeks to impart a sense of who Earhart was and what she wanted to be. Neimanis has cleverly mixed fact and fiction to create a script that rings true, right down to some made-up letters from Earhart to Eleanor Roosevelt, and she delivers the text with a good deal of nuance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Given the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, there's an extra haunting quality to "Air Heart," an inventive and absorbing aerial stage work about aviator Amelia Earhart currently at Baltimore Theatre Project. Written and performed by Mara Neimanis, the one-hour piece addresses the joy of flight, the curse of celebrity, and much more as it seeks to impart a sense of who Earhart was and what she wanted to be. Neimanis has cleverly mixed fact and fiction to create a script that rings true, right down to some made-up letters from Earhart to Eleanor Roosevelt, and she delivers the text with a good deal of nuance.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 7, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* What we really should want is to get the politicians "Listening to America," not just the PBS viewers who tune in commentator Bill Moyers' latest series premiering tonight.Continuing through the elections in November, the program (at 10 o'clock on Maryland Public Television) promises exploration of the issues of campaign '92 that go well beyond the headline topics of who may or may not have committed adultery, dodged the draft or smoked marijuana.For instance, the first two episodes, "America: What Went Wrong," focus on the award-winning Philadelphia Inquirer series (and book)
NEWS
By Meghan Daum | December 16, 2012
Amelia Earhart's "prenuptial agreement" with her husband, George Putnam, whom she married in 1931 when she was 32, drew a flurry of attention this week. Los Angeles writer Amanda Hess posted the letter on her Tumblr page after running across it in the online library of Purdue University, which houses Earhart's papers. "On our life together I want you to understand I shall not hold you to any midaevil [sic] code of faithfulness to me nor shall I consider myself bound to you similarly," Earhart wrote.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | October 16, 2009
The Informant! *** With any luck, before he reaches 40, Matt Damon will be recognized, as Edward Norton once put it, as "just a stone-cold good actor.... incredibly agile." He pulls off a brave comic change of pace in this Steven Soderbergh picture about a quirky whistle-blower. He anchors the movie with his unpredictable physical portrait of a man at odds with himself and makes it swing with his voice-over narration, full of quirky non sequiturs and Freudian slips. It's a brave performance, and a hoot.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | November 15, 2009
Amelia Earhart's name is back in the news these days with the recent release of the Hollywood biopic "Amelia," starring Hilary Swank as the ill-fated flier, and Richard Gere as George Putnam, her husband, publisher and public relations executive. Critics have not exactly given soaring reviews to this film treatment of the pioneering aviator's life and accomplishments. "The filmmakers spend so much time turning her into a dopey romantic figure that they never give her the animating, vital will or even much of a personality that might explain how a Kansas tomboy turned Boston social worker took to the skies and then, through her deeds and words, encouraged other women to chart their own courses," Manohla Dargis wrote last month in The New York Times.
NEWS
By Meghan Daum | December 16, 2012
Amelia Earhart's "prenuptial agreement" with her husband, George Putnam, whom she married in 1931 when she was 32, drew a flurry of attention this week. Los Angeles writer Amanda Hess posted the letter on her Tumblr page after running across it in the online library of Purdue University, which houses Earhart's papers. "On our life together I want you to understand I shall not hold you to any midaevil [sic] code of faithfulness to me nor shall I consider myself bound to you similarly," Earhart wrote.
NEWS
March 18, 1992
More than half a century after she vanished during the last leg of an attempted around-the-world flight, Amelia Earhart is back in the news. At a press conference in Washington this week, a Delaware-based aviation group unveiled tantalizing evidence suggesting Earhart crash-landed on tiny Nikumaroro Island in the Western Pacific, where she and her navigator, Fred Noonan, ultimately perished from exposure and thirst.Richard Gillespie, of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, said his team turned up a two-foot-long strip from the belly of Earhart's Lockheed Electra during a search of the island last October.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 20, 1992
Boston -- The detectives have come back with their evidence. One rubber heel for a woman's size 9 shoe. A threaded top from a bottle that once held stomach medicine. A piece of aluminum skin from the fuselage of a pre-World War II plane.These are now offered up as proof that Amelia Earhart died on an inhospitable atoll in the South Pacific. The 39-year-old pilot and her navigator attempting to add yet another first to her list -- The First Pilot to Circle the Globe near the Equator -- missed Howland Island.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The most tantalizing and enduring mystery in aviation history, the fate of the pioneering pilot Amelia Earhart, has yielded one of its central secrets, according to investigators who say they found fragments of her plane on a deserted Pacific island.Amid the coconut palms of Nikumaroro, an island about halfway between New Guinea and Hawaii, a search party from the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery found a sheet of metal that they say is from the plane's fuselage.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | November 15, 2009
Amelia Earhart's name is back in the news these days with the recent release of the Hollywood biopic "Amelia," starring Hilary Swank as the ill-fated flier, and Richard Gere as George Putnam, her husband, publisher and public relations executive. Critics have not exactly given soaring reviews to this film treatment of the pioneering aviator's life and accomplishments. "The filmmakers spend so much time turning her into a dopey romantic figure that they never give her the animating, vital will or even much of a personality that might explain how a Kansas tomboy turned Boston social worker took to the skies and then, through her deeds and words, encouraged other women to chart their own courses," Manohla Dargis wrote last month in The New York Times.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | October 16, 2009
The Informant! *** With any luck, before he reaches 40, Matt Damon will be recognized, as Edward Norton once put it, as "just a stone-cold good actor.... incredibly agile." He pulls off a brave comic change of pace in this Steven Soderbergh picture about a quirky whistle-blower. He anchors the movie with his unpredictable physical portrait of a man at odds with himself and makes it swing with his voice-over narration, full of quirky non sequiturs and Freudian slips. It's a brave performance, and a hoot.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 6, 2009
Bowen Pattison Weisheit Sr., a retired Harford County real estate lawyer and author who wrote of his World War II experiences as well as the disappearance of flier Amelia Earhart, died of heart failure April 29 while shad fishing on the Susquehanna River. The longtime Bel Air resident, who was pronounced dead at Harford Memorial Hospital, was 90. Mr. Weisheit, the son of a lawyer and West Towson developer, was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1936 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in 1940 from St. John's College in Annapolis.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1999
A Maryland undersea exploration company and the NOVA television program hope to solve one of the great mysteries of the century by finding the plane in which Amelia Earhart vanished over the Pacific Ocean 63 years ago."We think we have a pretty high probability of success," said David Jourdan, founder and president of Nauticos Corp., which has a track record of locating difficult-to-find wrecks, such as the Dakar, the Israeli submarine that was lost 20 years ago in the Mediterranean. Earhart, a celebrated aviator and icon of the 1930s, and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared July 2, 1937, while on an around-the-world flight.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 7, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* What we really should want is to get the politicians "Listening to America," not just the PBS viewers who tune in commentator Bill Moyers' latest series premiering tonight.Continuing through the elections in November, the program (at 10 o'clock on Maryland Public Television) promises exploration of the issues of campaign '92 that go well beyond the headline topics of who may or may not have committed adultery, dodged the draft or smoked marijuana.For instance, the first two episodes, "America: What Went Wrong," focus on the award-winning Philadelphia Inquirer series (and book)
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 20, 1992
Boston -- The detectives have come back with their evidence. One rubber heel for a woman's size 9 shoe. A threaded top from a bottle that once held stomach medicine. A piece of aluminum skin from the fuselage of a pre-World War II plane.These are now offered up as proof that Amelia Earhart died on an inhospitable atoll in the South Pacific. The 39-year-old pilot and her navigator attempting to add yet another first to her list -- The First Pilot to Circle the Globe near the Equator -- missed Howland Island.
NEWS
July 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Amelia Earhart is still missing, but they might have found her luggage.On the 54th anniversary of Earhart's disappearance, a team of explorers announced yesterday that this fall they will conduct a sea and land search of a remote Pacific atoll where they believe the pioneering pilot landed her plane and then died of thirst.The searchers are following up on a 1989 discovery of a small aluminum box on the island they believe could be the map case from her plane.A photo specialist said yesterday the box "is approximately the right size" as the map case seen inside Earhart's plane in a fuzzy photograph taken four days before Earhart vanished.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1999
A Maryland undersea exploration company and the NOVA television program hope to solve one of the great mysteries of the century by finding the plane in which Amelia Earhart vanished over the Pacific Ocean 63 years ago."We think we have a pretty high probability of success," said David Jourdan, founder and president of Nauticos Corp., which has a track record of locating difficult-to-find wrecks, such as the Dakar, the Israeli submarine that was lost 20 years ago in the Mediterranean. Earhart, a celebrated aviator and icon of the 1930s, and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared July 2, 1937, while on an around-the-world flight.
NEWS
March 18, 1992
More than half a century after she vanished during the last leg of an attempted around-the-world flight, Amelia Earhart is back in the news. At a press conference in Washington this week, a Delaware-based aviation group unveiled tantalizing evidence suggesting Earhart crash-landed on tiny Nikumaroro Island in the Western Pacific, where she and her navigator, Fred Noonan, ultimately perished from exposure and thirst.Richard Gillespie, of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, said his team turned up a two-foot-long strip from the belly of Earhart's Lockheed Electra during a search of the island last October.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The most tantalizing and enduring mystery in aviation history, the fate of the pioneering pilot Amelia Earhart, has yielded one of its central secrets, according to investigators who say they found fragments of her plane on a deserted Pacific island.Amid the coconut palms of Nikumaroro, an island about halfway between New Guinea and Hawaii, a search party from the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery found a sheet of metal that they say is from the plane's fuselage.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.